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John Calvin puts forward a very simple reason why love is the greatest gift: “Because faith and hope are our own: love is diffused among others.” In other words, faith and hope benefit the possessor, but love always benefits another. In John 13:34–35 Jesus says, “A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.” Love always requires an “other” as an object; love cannot remain within itself, and that is part of what makes love the greatest gift.
ConfessionalLutheran

So, What the Heck IS a Lutheran, anyway?

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The simple answer to this question is that a Lutheran is someone who holds to the inerrancy and infallibility of the Holy Scriptures and because of their alignment with Holy Scriptures, the Lutheran Confessions contained in the Book of Concord are readily accepted and preached. Here is a link to a site known as Lutheran Satire ( that will poke fun at false teachings, but the fun has a point beyond simple ragging on somebody) that will more fully explain the Lutheran position. 

 

Let it be noted that the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America is considered apostate by Confessional Lutherans at this time because of the denomination's various compromises with the world.

 

https://lutheransatire.org/what-we-believe/

 

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Not to criticise but genuinely to edify with these Scriptures in mind, not suggesting Luther is being glorified by you CL, or that you are anything other than a devoted follower of Christ, I find the inevitable creation of denominations, streams, movements, and affiliations a travesty of Christianity.

Yes, there are divisions and heresies to sort through, but the focus of a denomination on one acclaimed follower of Christ, be it Luther, Calvin, Wesley, Spurgeon or any other to the exclusion and relegation of the unity of the body of Christ, as is sometimes the case, does little for me.   

 

1Co 3:3-5
(3)  For you are yet carnal: for whereas there is among you envying, and strife, and divisions, are you not carnal, and walk as men?
(4)  For while one says, I am of Paul; and another, I am of Apollos; are you not carnal?
(5)  Who then is Paul, and who is Apollos, but ministers by whom you believed, even as the Lord gave to every man?

1Co 3:21-23
(21)  Therefore let no man glory in men. For all things are yours;
(22)  Whether Paul, or Apollos, or Cephas, or the world, or life, or death, or things present, or things to come; all are yours;
(23)  And you are Christ's; and Christ is God's.
 

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57 minutes ago, Placable37 said:

Not to criticise but genuinely to edify with these Scriptures in mind, not suggesting Luther is being glorified by you CL, or that you are anything other than a devoted follower of Christ, I find the inevitable creation of denominations, streams, movements, and affiliations a travesty of Christianity.

Yes, there are divisions and heresies to sort through, but the focus of a denomination on one acclaimed follower of Christ, be it Luther, Calvin, Wesley, Spurgeon or any other to the exclusion and relegation of the unity of the body of Christ, as is sometimes the case, does little for me.   

 

1Co 3:3-5
(3)  For you are yet carnal: for whereas there is among you envying, and strife, and divisions, are you not carnal, and walk as men?
(4)  For while one says, I am of Paul; and another, I am of Apollos; are you not carnal?
(5)  Who then is Paul, and who is Apollos, but ministers by whom you believed, even as the Lord gave to every man?

1Co 3:21-23
(21)  Therefore let no man glory in men. For all things are yours;
(22)  Whether Paul, or Apollos, or Cephas, or the world, or life, or death, or things present, or things to come; all are yours;
(23)  And you are Christ's; and Christ is God's.
 

An excellent thing to keep in mind, Placable37. In Christ we all are one.

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As Lutherans, we stand for the Truth and in doing so, we also firmly reject erroneous opinions in connection to our faith, even when those errors are offered by those who would presume to use the name " Lutheran." As Confessional Lutheran Christians, we uphold the unaltered Lutheran Confessions because they are in perfect concord with the words of Holy Scripture: 

https://theydiffer.com/difference-between-missouri-synod-and-elca/

 

Doctrine is important. It's important because it keeps us faithful to God and the principles espoused by doctrine are unchangeable. For those who eschew attending a church because they don't find it as pure as they'd like, I will offer up this little tidbit: The Scriptures were written down and collected by people who were thoroughly grounded and under the supervision of superiors in what they would call " organized religion." I would argue that the Church's " organizer" is God Himself and who are we to dispute with our Head, Who alone is Jesus Christ?

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7 hours ago, ConfessionalLutheran said:

The Scriptures were written down and collected by people who were thoroughly grounded and under the supervision of superiors in what they would call " organized religion." I would argue that the Church's " organizer" is God Himself and who are we to dispute with our Head, Who alone is Jesus Christ?

Even those meeting under the banner of "organic religion" have some degree of organisation, so the complaint is not with organisation per say, but over-organisation that becomes a dead work devoid of faith and quenches the Holy Spirit. 

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Staff
1 hour ago, SovereignGrace said:

Are some Lutheran like Martin Luther who held to a more reformed soteriology?

Or did the Reformation cease at Martin Luther's death?

 

Semper Reformanda (Latin for "the church must always be reformed").

 

God bless,

William

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