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William

Children of homosexuals more apt to be homosexuals?

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Schumm WR. J Biosoc Sci. 2010.

 

Abstract Ten narrative studies involving family histories of 262 children of gay fathers and lesbian mothers were evaluated statistically in response to Morrison's (2007) concerns about Cameron's (2006) research that had involved three narrative studies. Despite numerous attempts to bias the results in favour of the null hypothesis and allowing for up to 20 (of 63, 32%) coding errors, Cameron's (2006) hypothesis that gay and lesbian parents would be more likely to have gay, lesbian, bisexual or unsure (of sexual orientation) sons and daughters was confirmed. Percentages of children of gay and lesbian parents who adopted non-heterosexual identities ranged between 16% and 57%, with odds ratios of 1.7 to 12.1, depending on the mix of child and parent genders. Daughters of lesbian mothers were most likely (33% to 57%; odds ratios from 4.5 to 12.1) to report non-heterosexual identities. Data from ethnographic sources and from previous studies on gay and lesbian parenting were re-examined and found to support the hypothesis that social and parental influences may influence the expression of non-heterosexual identities and/or behaviour. Thus, evidence is presented from three different sources, contrary to most previous scientific opinion, even most previous scientific consensus, that suggests intergenerational transfer of sexual orientation can occur at statistically significant and substantial rates, especially for female parents or female children. In some analyses for sons, intergenerational transfer was not significant. Further research is needed with respect to pathways by which intergenerational transfer of sexual orientation may occur. The results confirm an evolving tendency among scholars to cite the possibility of some degree of intergenerational crossover of sexual orientation.

 

Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/20642872/

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To me it is simple , a household not governed by the Holy Spirit lets in other entities. It seems to me homosexuality is associated with paganism in various forms. Because of this God delivers men over to the lust of their hearts. Even here in America the celebrating of Halloween can open people up to unclean spirits. I feel paganism runs deep and permeates all cultures to various degrees. Homosexual parents bring into the home a spirit of defilement which of course can influence a child. It can be said a nurture vs nature. Since Christ conquered sin in the nature of the believer we nurture our children accordingly. Not so for homosexuals.

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The stats suggest that homosexuality is learned behavior.

  • Daughters of lesbian mothers were most likely (33% to 57%; odds ratios from 4.5 to 12.1) to report non-heterosexual identities.

That's a significant amount.

 

God bless,

William

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I agree, I think I supported that claim and also elaborated, that their is a correlation as well with paganism.

Romans 1:22-28 New King James Version (NKJV) 22 Professing to be wise, they became fools, 23 and changed the glory of the incorruptible God into an image made like corruptible man—and birds and four-footed animals and creeping things.

24 Therefore God also gave them up to uncleanness, in the lusts of their hearts, to dishonor their bodies among themselves, 25 who exchanged the truth of God for the lie, and worshiped and served the creature rather than the Creator, who is blessed forever. Amen.

26 For this reason God gave them up to vile passions. For even their women exchanged the natural use for what is against nature. 27 Likewise also the men, leaving the natural use of the woman, burned in their lust for one another, men with men committing what is shameful, and receiving in themselves the penalty of their error which was due.

28 And even as they did not like to retain God in their knowledge, God gave them over to a debased mind, to do those things which are not fitting;

 

 

 

 

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Well, these finding do not surprise me at all.  It's nice to see that there is a scientific study confirming what I already knew to be true.  Thanks William

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On 3/20/2018 at 1:39 PM, William said:

The stats suggest that homosexuality is learned behavior.

 

  • Daughters of lesbian mothers were most likely (33% to 57%; odds ratios from 4.5 to 12.1) to report non-heterosexual identities.

That's a significant amount.

 

God bless,

William

Well William, common sense should tell us that homosexuality or even sexuality in general is a learned trait. I have seen effeminate boys and tom-boyish girls grow up quite normal because they were steered into their stereotype gender roles.  

 

I have always said when the gays live openly, they are recruiting. Recruiting by getting a youngster to doubt their sexual orientation. If you infer a child has a choice, sometimes they are going to choose wrong.

 

The Big No Smiley Face, Emoticon

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On 3/20/2018 at 11:04 AM, William said:

Schumm WR. J Biosoc Sci. 2010.

 

Abstract Ten narrative studies involving family histories of 262 children of gay fathers and lesbian mothers were evaluated statistically in response to Morrison's (2007) concerns about Cameron's (2006) research that had involved three narrative studies. Despite numerous attempts to bias the results in favour of the null hypothesis and allowing for up to 20 (of 63, 32%) coding errors, Cameron's (2006) hypothesis that gay and lesbian parents would be more likely to have gay, lesbian, bisexual or unsure (of sexual orientation) sons and daughters was confirmed. Percentages of children of gay and lesbian parents who adopted non-heterosexual identities ranged between 16% and 57%, with odds ratios of 1.7 to 12.1, depending on the mix of child and parent genders. Daughters of lesbian mothers were most likely (33% to 57%; odds ratios from 4.5 to 12.1) to report non-heterosexual identities. Data from ethnographic sources and from previous studies on gay and lesbian parenting were re-examined and found to support the hypothesis that social and parental influences may influence the expression of non-heterosexual identities and/or behaviour. Thus, evidence is presented from three different sources, contrary to most previous scientific opinion, even most previous scientific consensus, that suggests intergenerational transfer of sexual orientation can occur at statistically significant and substantial rates, especially for female parents or female children. In some analyses for sons, intergenerational transfer was not significant. Further research is needed with respect to pathways by which intergenerational transfer of sexual orientation may occur. The results confirm an evolving tendency among scholars to cite the possibility of some degree of intergenerational crossover of sexual orientation.

 

Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/20642872/

I have read the study previously, good post!

 

Sexuality is a learned process, humans are not born homosexuals as the rainbow flag would want you to believe.

 

This is why the homosexual agenda is moving to enter LGBT curriculum into the K-8 public classroom, and public libraries.

 

I thank God the liberal tide is being reversed, the recent Colorado cake baker Supreme Court 7/2 decision was a major victory for conservative America.

Edited by Truth7t7
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