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CDF47

Please Pray for My Marriage

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My wife filed for divorce. I do not want the divorce and I am praying she returns to me. We have been together for 19 years and married for 11 years. We met as teenagers, in fact. I would appreciate any prayers that you could offer. Thank you and God bless.

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My wife filed for divorce. I do not want the divorce and I am praying she returns to me. We have been together for 19 years and married for 11 years. We met as teenagers, in fact. I would appreciate any prayers that you could offer. Thank you and God bless.

 

I'm definitely praying for you, brother. I know how painful divorce is.. my ex-wife divorced me four years ago and the pain of that process is unbelievable. God's blessings alight on you.

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Thank you everyone for your prayers. I really appreciate it.

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My wife filed for divorce. I do not want the divorce and I am praying she returns to me. We have been together for 19 years and married for 11 years. We met as teenagers, in fact. I would appreciate any prayers that you could offer. Thank you and God bless.

 

Dear brother have you got the LOVE DARE book yet? I am positive this book could very well save your marriage, even if she has actually divorced you. The Movie FIREPROOF is why the book was writen. Please dear Brother at least buy it and give what it says a effort. I know it works.

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My wife filed for divorce. I do not want the divorce and I am praying she returns to me. We have been together for 19 years and married for 11 years. We met as teenagers, in fact. I would appreciate any prayers that you could offer. Thank you and God bless.

 

will do and will ask for my adult sunday class and bible institute students to pray for you

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As my counselor for 2 yrs shared with me, he was divorced without wanting it a long time ago. This is a fallen world -- stuff happens -- he was on anti-depresants for several months. It can be a really tough world.

 

And, yes, hopefully with counseling -- the two of you Can get back together.

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I'm no expert, but don't you have the right to not agree to a divorce? it was my understanding that there needs to be a valid reason for divorce, I'm guessing different places in the world have different rules. You're wife should be making an effort to make the marriage work out, it isn't you're fault here.. Prayers to you.

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Dear brother have you got the LOVE DARE book yet? I am positive this book could very well save your marriage, even if she has actually divorced you. The Movie FIREPROOF is why the book was writen. Please dear Brother at least buy it and give what it says a effort. I know it works.

 

I didn't get the book yet but I watched the movie. It was excellent. I asked my wife to watch. Thanks for the advice.

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I'm definitely praying for you, brother. I know how painful divorce is.. my ex-wife divorced me four years ago and the pain of that process is unbelievable. God's blessings alight on you.

 

Sorry to hear about your divorce. It is definitely very painful. Thank you for your prayers.

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Praying for you brother. Keep your eyes on Jesus.

Thank you! I will.

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Prayer from me as well. God bless you and your wife.

Thank you! God bless you as well!

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My wife filed for divorce. I do not want the divorce and I am praying she returns to me. We have been together for 19 years and married for 11 years. We met as teenagers, in fact. I would appreciate any prayers that you could offer. Thank you and God bless.

 

will do and will ask for my adult sunday class and bible institute students to pray for you

That would be great if you did. I would really appreciate that. Thanks for your prayers!

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As my counselor for 2 yrs shared with me, he was divorced without wanting it a long time ago. This is a fallen world -- stuff happens -- he was on anti-depresants for several months. It can be a really tough world.

 

And, yes, hopefully with counseling -- the two of you Can get back together.

Yeah, it is very depressing. I know why he was on anti-depressants. I really hope so. Thanks.

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I'm no expert, but don't you have the right to not agree to a divorce? it was my understanding that there needs to be a valid reason for divorce, I'm guessing different places in the world have different rules. You're wife should be making an effort to make the marriage work out, it isn't you're fault here.. Prayers to you.

No, if one person wants a divorce here then it is granted. Thanks for your prayers!

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Praying for you brother.

 

My first wife had divorced me too. My ex played some serious mental games. She told me she filed, and six months later she revealed she never filed. Three years later she really filed, and we divorced a couple of months after, and she was remarried three months later.

 

It wasn't until seven years later that I remarried.

 

All I can say is that divorce for me was like a glass step to my house. Every time I came home, there was that glass step with her corpse in it as a reminder to me daily of my failures.

 

Do everything in your own power CDF, keep faithful to God above all, but remember 1 Corinthians 7:15 exists.

 

God bless,

William

 

William within the denomination your in, don't they allow persons who are divorced, by no fault of their own to be in ministry? O know My SB denomination they do, it is entirely up to the local church really.

 

My wife and I have a genuine love, and ministered to people who have been going through a divorce or became divorced. We have tried to minister to those who are in the process of divorce and help with restoring, which is far easier than once divorce has happened.. Our counseling Center seldom was able to get people to slow down and rethink what they were doing. So often minds were made up, or someone was waiting on the side. Jesus is correct hardness of heart is always at the root.

 

All too often divorced Christians, suffer suck deep shame and even though the divorce was niot entirely their fault, the church treats them like second class Christians. I remind them ALL sin is forgiven the same way. 1 John 1:9 Recovering from divorce is as close to a mate dying as one con imagine. It is so very painful, some take several years to recover.

 

On a stress scale, which is numbered 1 to 100, divorce is 99. So the pain often takes several years to become close to pain free, but some pain resides for many years,.

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William within the denomination your in, don't they allow persons who are divorced, by no fault of their own to be in ministry? O know My SB denomination they do, it is entirely up to the local church really.

 

My wife and I have a genuine love, and ministered to people who have been going through a divorce or became divorced. We have tried to minister to those who are in the process of divorce and help with restoring, which is far easier than once divorce has happened.. Our counseling Center seldom was able to get people to slow down and rethink what they were doing. So often minds were made up, or someone was waiting on the side. Jesus is correct hardness of heart is always at the root.

 

All too often divorced Christians, suffer suck deep shame and even though the divorce was niot entirely their fault, the church treats them like second class Christians. I remind them ALL sin is forgiven the same way. 1 John 1:9 Recovering from divorce is as close to a mate dying as one con imagine. It is so very painful, some take several years to recover.

 

On a stress scale, which is numbered 1 to 100, divorce is 99. So the pain often takes several years to become close to pain free, but some pain resides for many years,.

 

I agree with the pain scale.

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Sorry to hear about your divorce. It is definitely very painful. Thank you for your prayers.

 

Hang tough my brother.

 

My first wife walked out on me and our three sons! I know the pain you have. See if you have a divorce care in your area. it is a Christian based ministry that is a small group. I helped moderate one in my church for 2 years. You meet, watch a video, share thoughts, do some exercises and if the leaders know their stuff- design activities you can do as a group and help build a small community of like minded.

 

It definitely helps ease the pain and gets you to focus on the Lord in the midst of the storm!

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Hang tough my brother.

 

My first wife walked out on me and our three sons! I know the pain you have. See if you have a divorce care in your area. it is a Christian based ministry that is a small group. I helped moderate one in my church for 2 years. You meet, watch a video, share thoughts, do some exercises and if the leaders know their stuff- design activities you can do as a group and help build a small community of like minded.

 

It definitely helps ease the pain and gets you to focus on the Lord in the midst of the storm!

 

Thanks. I have a Divorce Care right near me.

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Praying for ya. May Christ give you peace in these hard times.

Thank you!

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