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Innerfire89

Diversity in church.

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So another topic here got me thinking about the churches I've visited around Mississippi and how they seem segregated. I don't know why it's like that here in the south. The worship and preaching are just the same in what I'll call black church and white church except there's usually a drum set in the black churches, that's about it.

 

Now we do have a few churches here and there that are in fact racists, but from what I've seen most are very wellcoming to whoever comes in.

 

I think there are other reasons behind why theses churches seem segregated.

#1. People go to their local neihorhood church and it's common for families to live close and attend the same church, most families have been in those churches for generations.

#2. It's just easier to feel comfortable around your own culture.

#3. We are all curious when we see a new face, weather they be white or black. Imagine a church full of white people turning around in the pews to look at the new black guy that just came in, you can see how that might be taken the wrong way.

And lastly #4. It's easy to assume that a church might be racist when you don't see any diversity in any church you find in the south.

 

 

But out of curiosity, is this something common anywhere else, or is it just the south?

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So another topic here got me thinking about the churches I've visited around Mississippi and how they seem segregated. I don't know why it's like that here in the south. The worship and preaching are just the same in what I'll call black church and white church except there's usually a drum set in the black churches, that's about it.

 

Now we do have a few churches here and there that are in fact racists, but from what I've seen most are very wellcoming to whoever comes in.

 

I think there are other reasons behind why theses churches seem segregated.

#1. People go to their local neihorhood church and it's common for families to live close and attend the same church, most families have been in those churches for generations.

#2. It's just easier to feel comfortable around your own culture.

#3. We are all curious when we see a new face, weather they be white or black. Imagine a church full of white people turning around in the pews to look at the new black guy that just came in, you can see how that might be taken the wrong way.

And lastly #4. It's easy to assume that a church might be racist when you don't see any diversity in any church you find in the south.

 

 

But out of curiosity, is this something common anywhere else, or is it just the south?

 

No, and it is not limited to whites and blacks. There are plenty of Korean churches where I last lived and now live (Washington and California).

 

My church is mainly comprised of Whites and Asians, however, we have missionaries and tithe money which goes to places like Uganda.

 

I think the points you shared are rational reasons for segregation. People of my Asian heritage often congregate with those speaking the same language not being native to America.

 

What I notice most about the Korean church is a lotto system. Congregants actually collect money to bring over relatives from foreign nations, set them up with a business loan interest free to succeed over here in America. When they are established they are expected to contribute to the next person wishing to come into America.

 

God bless,

William

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No, and it is not limited to whites and blacks. There are plenty of Korean churches where I last lived and now live (Washington and California).

 

My church is mainly comprised of Whites and Asians, however, we have missionaries and tithe money which goes to places like Uganda.

 

I think the points you shared are rational reasons for segregation. People of my Asian heritage often congregate with those speaking the same language not being native to America.

 

What I notice most about the Korean church is a lotto system. Congregants actually collect money to bring over relatives from foreign nations, set them up with a business loan interest free to succeed over here in America. When they are established they are expected to contribute to the next person wishing to come into America.

 

God bless,

William

 

It really shows you where the heart of the church is when they're helping their brothers and the poor.

 

 

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It really shows you where the heart of the church is when they're helping their brothers and the poor.

 

 

1 Timothy 5:8 - But if anyone does not provide for his relatives, and especially for members of his household, he has denied the faith and is worse than an unbeliever.

 

God bless,

William

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It's rather strange but it's really "self-segregation".

 

I think one of the positives about living overseas is the diversity you get in the churches among the foreigners that attend.

 

I remember being in Japan and the gentleman who was supposed to preach that day showed up just on time. When he got to the pulpit he apologized because it was snowing and he never experienced snow before. He thought he could ride his bicycle right through it with ease because he thought it would be just like going through powder - the snow was very wet and thick that day.

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