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Bliss

What do you look for in a bible?

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What do you look for when buying a bible?, what is your preferences..

 

Do you go for a few cheaper versions of the bible or do you like to get one quality goatskin or leather bible?...

 

Is there a preferred font size you go for, a certain colour/pattern or material, is red letter important to you?.. single/double column, paragraphs, matching lines etc etc.

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I like the quality large font Bibles to keep just one at home (brown or black leather). Aside from that my other Bibles are just the less expensive type.

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Since I do most of my reading on a screen these days, I tend to look for pretty pictures and a good graphic novel format for printed bibles. :RpS_w00t:

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Like the Book of Mormon? :RpS_blink: :RpS_smile:

 

Oh don't you worry yourself atpollard. It is nothing like that.

 

For many years I have used both the KJV and NASB. When I read one I miss the other. I constantly say to myself, "Ya know, the ____ reads better or is clearer in meaning than __ in this passage."

So what I have been doing is going through each passage of each book with my KJV and NASB and writing out each passage based on what they say. Sometimes I will have the KJV while I think slightly more times I will have the NASB. Oftentimes it is a mix. Some passages that I have memorized from the KJV I simply keep even though it contains words such as "ye". I also chose to stick with the NASB in capitalizing the He/Him/His when it is referring to God. There are quiet a few times I supply a different word than what both versions may happen to use. Also, for "doulos" I always have it read simply "slave" when it reads we are "servants/bond-servants of God (or of Christ)". I cut down on many of the italicized words employed in both versions. I simply kept the Greek words in some instances such as when God the Father or the Lord Jesus is referred to as Despotēs (Strong's #1203) or when the Lord Jesus is referred to as poimēn and episkopos of your souls in 1 Peter 2:25.

In addition to both versions I also refer to the Greek New Testament and the BDAG (3rd Edition). A few times I will go to biblegateway.com and see how many other versions translate the same verse.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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It is true that online you can easily see many versions at once and is good for study.. However you must admit you can't beat the good old fashioned book.

 

I myself have various versions... Most low quality bibles, I do have some half decent leather bibles.. My main choice at the moment is my ESV journal bible.

 

I am looking to get a high quality goatskin ESV or NASB in a 10/11 font with red lettering and paragraphed. At around £150 it needs to be near perfect for a main Bible but so far I've not seen any that fit the bill.

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Oh don't you worry yourself atpollard. It is nothing like that.

 

For many years I have used both the KJV and NASB. When I read one I miss the other. I constantly say to myself, "Ya know, the ____ reads better or is clearer in meaning than __ in this passage."

So what I have been doing is going through each passage of each book with my KJV and NASB and writing out each passage based on what they say. Sometimes I will have the KJV while I think slightly more times I will have the NASB. Oftentimes it is a mix. Some passages that I have memorized from the KJV I simply keep even though it contains words such as "ye". I also chose to stick with the NASB in capitalizing the He/Him/His when it is referring to God. There are quiet a few times I supply a different word than what both versions may happen to use. Also, for "doulos" I always have it read simply "slave" when it reads we are "servants/bond-servants of God (or of Christ)". I cut down on many of the italicized words employed in both versions. I simply kept the Greek words in some instances such as when God the Father or the Lord Jesus is referred to as Despotēs (Strong's #1203) or when the Lord Jesus is referred to as poimēn and episkopos of your souls in 1 Peter 2:25.

In addition to both versions I also refer to the Greek New Testament and the BDAG (3rd Edition). A few times I will go to biblegateway.com and see how many other versions translate the same verse.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

KJV and NASB are the combinations I use as well.

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I like to use a NKJV, although I want to transition to the KJV. I like Bibles that aren't filled with a lot of notes. Although if I was to use a study Bible I like the Thompsham Chain.

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Bliss; I am at the other end of life that you most likely are. I bout all my many Bibles with not thinking about how small the print was. Now that my eyes have slowly changed its hard to read small print. I had my eye doctor give me a prescription for special reading glasses so I could read the smaller print. It does not help much as the larger print is what helps me now.

 

I am having eye surgery later this month (Oct. 2017) hopefully this will help too. My point is if at all possible don't buy the smallest print to get a smaller Bible.

 

 

justme

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You should get a Bible that has cross references. Sometimes you can understand a particular passage better if you know what the Bible says someplace else.

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Bliss; I am at the other end of life that you most likely are. I bout all my many Bibles with not thinking about how small the print was. Now that my eyes have slowly changed its hard to read small print. I had my eye doctor give me a prescription for special reading glasses so I could read the smaller print. It does not help much as the larger print is what helps me now.

 

I am having eye surgery later this month (Oct. 2017) hopefully this will help too. My point is if at all possible don't buy the smallest print to get a smaller Bible.

 

 

justme

 

Funnily enough I have just got back from the opticians a couple hours ago, I pick up my new glasses next week.. I am still young ish but my eyes aren't perfect, I have one bad eye.. That is hard to read anything at all even with glasses.. I'm lucky that my other eye is good..

I purposely avoid small font, a font size 10 is the smallest I'd buy in a book.. Small bibles would look silly on me anyway.. I'm a big guy,

who wants a small Bible anyway.. No need to be discreet about having a Bible on you.

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You should get a Bible that has cross references. Sometimes you can understand a particular passage better if you know what the Bible says someplace else.

 

Having been a Pastor and gone to Seminary i better have more than one Bible right? I have about 30 different Bibles, maybe a few more. the Bible that i have used for a long time and preached out of is the NIV Study Bible 1985. this is the ONLY NIV Bible I would ever suggest anyone to use or buy. I have two Bibles I read and study from the NASB and the Holman Christian Standard Bible now out of print. I often refer to my INTERLINER GREEK ENGLISH NEW TESTAMENT which I use in coordination with the NASB Exhaustive Concordance.

 

A couple of tools I suggest for added fun in Bible study would be a HARMONY OF THE GOSPELS, in a version you read most, and VINES EXPOSITORY DICTIONARY OF NEW TESTAMENT WORDS. As a person adds to their collection of books that are tools, which we call a LIBRARY, I suggest rather tan buying a set of commentaries, buy each commentary from a author you know or your pastor suggests, for a book of the Bible your Subday School class is in or from what book of the Bible your pastor is preaching from.

 

Just a few ideas of mine I hope you might enjoy.

 

 

justme.

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Having been a Pastor and gone to Seminary i better have more than one Bible right? I have about 30 different Bibles, maybe a few more. the Bible that i have used for a long time and preached out of is the NIV Study Bible 1985. this is the ONLY NIV Bible I would ever suggest anyone to use or buy. I have two Bibles I read and study from the NASB and the Holman Christian Standard Bible now out of print. I often refer to my INTERLINER GREEK ENGLISH NEW TESTAMENT which I use in coordination with the NASB Exhaustive Concordance.

 

A couple of tools I suggest for added fun in Bible study would be a HARMONY OF THE GOSPELS, in a version you read most, and VINES EXPOSITORY DICTIONARY OF NEW TESTAMENT WORDS. As a person adds to their collection of books that are tools, which we call a LIBRARY, I suggest rather tan buying a set of commentaries, buy each commentary from a author you know or your pastor suggests, for a book of the Bible your Subday School class is in or from what book of the Bible your pastor is preaching from.

 

Just a few ideas of mine I hope you might enjoy.

 

 

justme.

 

I agree with not buying any recent NIV translation, they have gone way off track with the gender issue.. I am sure you know all about it,

I have around 10-12 bibles.. And about 8 or so other Christian books related to fasting, prayer etc etc.. I have more books than I'll ever probably read but if your anything like me it doesn't stop you buying more.

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I agree with not buying any recent NIV translation, they have gone way off track with the gender issue.. I am sure you know all about it,

I have around 10-12 bibles.. And about 8 or so other Christian books related to fasting, prayer etc etc.. I have more books than I'll ever probably read but if your anything like me it doesn't stop you buying more.

 

My bride has gently reminded me a couple of times I bought a bool I already had, so I check first from now on.to make sure, then I go for it. Blessings.

 

 

justme

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On ‎9‎/‎25‎/‎2017 at 11:36 AM, Bliss said:

What do you look for when buying a bible?, what is your preferences..

 

Do you go for a few cheaper versions of the bible or do you like to get one quality goatskin or leather bible?...

 

Is there a preferred font size you go for, a certain colour/pattern or material, is red letter important to you?.. single/double column, paragraphs, matching lines etc etc.

When I am ready for a new bible I keep the writings from the Protestant Reformation in mind . Only a bible that has material from the Protestant Reformation can be classified as being fully accurate and trustworthy . I stay away from any bibles that are based on contemporary material because they are boring and almost never get their point across . I am also careful about what publishing companies I choose when shopping for a new bible. The fact is that if any of my bibles grow old and difficult to read, I shop for direct replacements . Worth the time it takes to order them because many are out of print , but not impossible to search for if you know where to look and what publisher carries them .

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Large print, and I do like Christ's words in red. Have had the same Bible for 20-25 years, NKJV, lots of slips of paper in it, but almost no written on the page scribbled notes.

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On 9/26/2017 at 3:53 AM, Bliss said:

It is true that online you can easily see many versions at once and is good for study.. However you must admit you can't beat the good old fashioned book.

 

I myself have various versions... Most low quality bibles, I do have some half decent leather bibles.. My main choice at the moment is my ESV journal bible.

 

I am looking to get a high quality goatskin ESV or NASB in a 10/11 font with red lettering and paragraphed. At around £150 it needs to be near perfect for a main Bible but so far I've not seen any that fit the bill.

Have you looked here —-> 

SCHUYLERBIBLE.COM

I seen the site before it looks cool for some high end Bibles 

 Blessings 

Bill 

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As for what I look for in a Bible. It depends on if I have ever read that translation before . If not I go low end. Not paperback but not very expensive. Usaly around the 30 $ mark . If it’s one I like I will go after genuine leather large print ,references along with translation notes . Red letters is a plus but not essential.

for my top favorites NASV,ESV,NKJV,and KJV. 

I will soon be trying out the NET with translation notes . Only problem is to get the notes you must go high end. 

Blessings 

Bill

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