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ChatterBox

Christians return to town ISIS destroyed

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The Iraqi mainly-Christian town of Karamles was devastated by ISIS, but now the first ten families have returned and more are following. Liberated in the Battle of Mosul last year, the town is still mostly destroyed. No electricity has been restored yet, but families are applying for funds to rebuild homes, Church services have resumed and schools will reopen next month. They are hoping for another 250 families to return, with more coming as the town rebuilds.

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It is mixed news. Of the 800 families that lived there, only 300 have been able to return so far and 300 more may not return at all. However they are reciving support from Christian groups worldwide.

Update 2018 April 24th

 

However in areas like Qaraqosh church services have resumed, and the city is slowly recovering.

https://www.opendoorsuk.org/news/stories/iraq-180426/

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11 hours ago, Truthfrees said:

i'm concerned for it happening again though

 

if anyone deserves asylum it would be these special people

I think it is very telling that these people who truly deserve asylum want to rebuild and return to their own homes. The least we can do is provide them with all the halp available to build a safe and thriving town, although the Red Cross appeal for them seems to have closed.

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4 hours ago, ChatterBox said:

I think it is very telling that these people who truly deserve asylum want to rebuild and return to their own homes. The least we can do is provide them with all the halp available to build a safe and thriving town, although the Red Cross appeal for them seems to have closed.

yes - i guess you are right - if they want to rebuild then they deserve support

 

if it was my family though i would do everything i could to get them to go somewhere safe

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I wound up listening to a sermon, sitting right next to a Syrian Christian! He felt led to attend a Bible College near here. Shortly after he left, his hometown was a battlefield against daesh; it never fell though.

 

He could not answer any of my questions, and had no opinion on anything in the region. All he would say about it was "I don't know."

 

That US foreign policy helped create the whole tragedy only makes matters worse.

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8 hours ago, RazeontheRock said:

That US foreign policy helped create the whole tragedy only makes matters worse.

That's been happening for quite sometime now... 

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3 hours ago, Uncle Siggy said:

That's been happening for quite sometime now... 

Yeah, it has.

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On 6/19/2018 at 6:33 AM, Uncle Siggy said:

That's been happening for quite sometime now... 

This is part of the reason Trump got elected, right? To stop that nonsense.

I'd like to see poppy production in Afghanistan go unprotected by US efforts, can we add that to the campaign platform?

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21 hours ago, RazeontheRock said:

This is part of the reason Trump got elected, right? To stop that nonsense.

I'd like to see poppy production in Afghanistan go unprotected by US efforts, can we add that to the campaign platform?

A little bit of napalm would solve the problem...

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On 6/20/2018 at 9:26 AM, RazeontheRock said:

This is part of the reason Trump got elected, right? To stop that nonsense.

I'd like to see poppy production in Afghanistan go unprotected by US efforts, can we add that to the campaign platform?

Intelligence agencies involved in drug trade.  This has been going on for 1/2 a century.

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1 hour ago, CDF47 said:

Intelligence agencies involved in drug trade.  This has been going on for 1/2 a century.

Yes, unfortunately the very nature of intelligence agencies demand secrecy; but that very secrecy allows unchecked power which lead to unchecked corruption. I remember Ronald Reagan was humbled by the amount of intelligent, patriotic people that were willing to advise him on many issues. There still are good people that care about where the country is headed. These people, by their very nature, will seek the ear of the President. I hope Trump will listen to these advisors and start getting things right. Let's pray for our country's direction.

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15 hours ago, deade said:

Yes, unfortunately the very nature of intelligence agencies demand secrecy; but that very secrecy allows unchecked power which lead to unchecked corruption. I remember Ronald Reagan was humbled by the amount of intelligent, patriotic people that were willing to advise him on many issues. There still are good people that care about where the country is headed. These people, by their very nature, will seek the ear of the President. I hope Trump will listen to these advisors and start getting things right. Let's pray for our country's direction.

Yes, this reminds me of the JFK speech regarding secrecy and a free press.  Below is a portion of that speech:

 

 

 

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On 6/21/2018 at 9:25 AM, CDF47 said:

Intelligence agencies involved in drug trade.  This has been going on for 1/2 a century.

Cops always have the best dope. And were the outrageous pushers selling LSD. Now heroin?!?  Drain the swamp already, this is little better than sending the populace to gas chambers.

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2 hours ago, RazeontheRock said:

Cops always have the best dope. And were the outrageous pushers selling LSD. Now heroin?!?  Drain the swamp already, this is little better than sending the populace to gas chambers.

Yeah, heroin use in the US has exploded since the war in Afghanistan.  Instead of burning down the poppie fields as promised, they are using them.  Same old game.

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1 hour ago, RazeontheRock said:

Who promised to burn down the poppy fields? The US, upon entering AF?

It was reported on Fox News that the poppy fields would be burnt down.  I can not find the exact clip but Geraldo Rivera was reporting I believe.  They were going to destroy them and rebuild with peppers,...  They had a US Marine being interviewed on the skit.

Edited by CDF47

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On 9/22/2017 at 10:19 AM, ChatterBox said:

The Iraqi mainly-Christian town of Karamles was devastated by ISIS, but now the first ten families have returned and more are following. Liberated in the Battle of Mosul last year, the town is still mostly destroyed. No electricity has been restored yet, but families are applying for funds to rebuild homes, Church services have resumed and schools will reopen next month. They are hoping for another 250 families to return, with more coming as the town rebuilds.

Edited by Becky .. You have been asked to follow the ToS  please do so. 

 

Use Proper Grammar, Punctuation, and Capitalization:

If English is not your second language, then you are expected to show other board members the courtesy of properly punctuating and capitalizing your posts. It is commonplace on the web to disregard these rules but improper grammar does not demonstrate consideration toward others who are trying to understand what you communicate. Mistakes in grammar are understandable but willful sloth may result in posts being deleted if they are consistently sloppy.

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11 hours ago, CDF47 said:

It was reported on Fox News that the poppy fields would be burnt down.  I can not find the exact clip but Geraldo Rivera was reporting I believe.  They were going to destroy them and rebuild with peppers,...  They had a US Marine being interviewed on the skit.

No More Opium, No More Money for Afghan Villagers | Fox News

 

Fox News Makes Excuse for CIA’s Afghan Opium Cultivation

 

US/NATO Troops Patrolling Opium Poppy Fields in Afghanistan | Public Intelligence

 

Taliban destroy poppy fields in surprise clampdown on Afghan opium growers | World news | The Guardian

 

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Makes it seem like everybody's in on it. 

Also raises respect for hard working US farmers who make a living growing wheat, which Afghani farmers haven't figured out how to do.

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