Jump to content

The Protestant Community

Christian and Theologically Protestant? Or, sincerely inquiring about the Protestant faith? Welcome to Christforums the Christian Protestant community. You'll first need to register in order to join our community. Create or respond to threads on your favorite topics and subjects. Registration takes less than a minute, it's simple, fast, and free! Enjoy the fellowship! God bless, Christforums' Staff
Register now

Fenced Community

Christforums is a Protestant Christian forum, open to Bible-believing Christians such as Presbyterians, Lutherans, Reformed, Baptists, Church of Christ members, Pentecostals, Anglicans. Methodists, Charismatics, or any other conservative, Nicene- derived Christian Church. We do not solicit cultists of any kind, including Mormons, Jehovah's Witnesses, Eastern Lightning, Falun Gong, Unification Church, Aum Shinrikyo, Christian Scientists or any other non-Nicene, non-Biblical heresy.
Register now

Christian Fellowship

John Calvin puts forward a very simple reason why love is the greatest gift: “Because faith and hope are our own: love is diffused among others.” In other words, faith and hope benefit the possessor, but love always benefits another. In John 13:34–35 Jesus says, “A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.” Love always requires an “other” as an object; love cannot remain within itself, and that is part of what makes love the greatest gift.
Sign in to follow this  
News Feeder

Study Shows Majority of British Catholics Now Support Abortion

Recommended Posts

A majority of Catholic Brits now are in favor of abortion, according to a new survey. This may come as a surprise to many, seeing as the Catholic Church has historically maintained a firm stance against abortion.

 

 

 

More...

Share this post


Link to post

That article is misleading, as it misses out the large caveat included in the survey itself ( PDF here). If you go to the original study the article quotes, the notes include the following:

"Note that small sample sizes mean caution should be used when looking at figures for the Roman Catholic group in 2012 and 2016, and the Non-Christian group."

 

Also right underneath the Abortion entry is:

"However, we need to treat these within-Christianity trends with some caution as the sample sizes are small."

 

What is disturbing is that they couldn't find enough Christians in their survey sample for valid population-wide statistical trends to be identified. The survey admits their sample sizes were so small that the percentage swing could be entirely down to what individuals they got, and not identify a trend at all.

 

Edited by ChatterBox
added link to PDF
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Topics

    • Most Republicans and Democrats Support Major Abortion Restrictions, Poll Finds

      A majority of Americans, including most Democrats, support tighter restrictions on abortion that are prohibited by Roe v. Wade and companion rulings, according to a new survey. View the full article

      in Christian Current Events

    • How to Teach Your Teen to Study the Bible

      Parents contact me frequently to ask what devotionals or young adult Bible studies I would recommend they do with their teens. As our kids enter the teen years, our responsibility as parents is to help them develop good habits of interacting with the Bible. Finding an approach that is age-appropriate and manageable is key. My encouragement is to simply read the Bible with your teen in a way that models and trains Bible literacy—no special teen resource required. Your teen will be exposed to devotional content and topical studies at every turn, and they likely don’t need a resource targeted specifically at their demographic. Most teens are missing basic tools to help them read and learn the Bible on their own. By guiding them in some basic study methods, you can position them to use devotional and topical material with far better discernment and far greater benefit, as those types of resources assume a firsthand knowledge of the Bible many teens have not yet developed. Here is a simple approach that you can adapt to fit the age of your teen. 1. Pick a book of the Bible to read and discuss together. If you have never studied together, start with a shorter book like Jonah or James. If at all possible, tackle longer books like Genesis or Hebrews while you still have the opportunity to guide and shape their study method. The goal is to give your teen exposure to the value of studying an entire book from start to finish, as opposed to only studying topically or devotionally. If your church is doing a sermon series through an entire book of the Bible, you could align your discussions with the preaching schedule to add another layer to what you’re learning. 2. Get a copy of your selected book of the Bible that has room for taking notes. You can create this by copying one chapter at a time from Bible Gateway into a document. Set the margins to wide and the spacing to 1.5 so you have room to write. Or, you can purchase these great ESV Scripture Journals if you want something ready-made, usable, and attractive. Get a copy for you and for your child. 3. Set a schedule to meet once a week for a 30-minute discussion. Use a reading plan to help you break the text into readable increments. Most reading plans are set up for daily reading through the entire Bible over a specific period of time. Simply adapt the daily portions into weekly ones for the book of your choosing. For example, this ESV reading plan covers the book of James in eight days, but you could cover it in eight weeks using the same text divisions. Create a schedule for your discussion times that notes dates and passages to be discussed. A schedule for James might look like this: Week Discuss: 1 Intro questions 2 James 1 3 James 2:1–13 4 James 2:14–26 5 James 3:1–12 6 James 3:13–18 7 James 4:1–10 8 James 4:11–5:12 9 James 5:13–20   4. Get a bird’s-eye view. For your first discussion time, ask your teen to come with answers to the following questions about the book you’ve chosen: Who wrote the book? To whom was it written? When was it written? In what literary style was it written? What are the central themes of the book? A good study Bible can provide these answers, or an online resource like Bible Gateway. I also highly recommend the Bible Project’s “Explore” series, which gives overviews to books of the Bible. (Here is the page for James, to give you a feel for how and what they communicate.) As you read together through the book you’ve chosen, help your teen think about how the answers to these questions shape their understanding of the book’s message. 5. Prepare for discussion. Each week before you meet to discuss the text, both you and your teen prepare by doing the following: Read the week’s passage from start to finish. In the margin of the copy of the text: Write (or make a drawing of) the main idea of the passage. Write a one- to two-sentence summary of what you read. Find one attribute of God that the passage is teaching. (Here is a list of attributes that can help your teen practice reading the Bible with a Godward focus.) Write two things you observe in the margin. Write two questions you have about what you’ve read. 6. Meet to discuss. Go over what each of you has noted in your copy of the text during your personal study time. Compare your answers, observations, and questions. Look for answers to your questions in an accessible commentary or study Bible. You could also track down answers after you meet together and discuss them the following week. Then, explore the following questions together: How does this passage fit into the book as a whole? How does it flow from the previous section of the text? How does this passage minister to its original audience? How does it minister to us today? Is there a sin to confess? Is there cause for thanksgiving or praise to God? Is there a promise or truth to trust in? Is there an attitude to change or a motive to examine? Is there a command to obey or an example to imitate? Is there an error to confront or avoid? (Note that you have a rich opportunity to practice and model vulnerability with your teen in these questions.) 7. Pray together. Finally, ask the Holy Spirit to help you apply what you have learned. The teen years are pivotal discipleship years for our kids. In these years they feel a restlessness to enter into mature adulthood but often an accompanying lack of clarity about how to do so. Give them adult-sized tools for navigating their Bibles, and help them learn how to use them. Encourage them to use devotional and topical materials as supplements to, but not substitutes for, direct study of the Bible itself. Model good habits of Bible reading. And most of all, savor the shared learning that results when a parent and a teen sit down to open the Word together. View the full article

      in Christian Current Events

    • Is Call the Midwife Taking a Pro-Abortion Turn in Season 8?

      The latest season of Call the Midwife has a major abortion storyline that is drawing applause from pro-choice viewers and concern from pro-lifers who watch the show. View the full article

      in Christian Current Events

    • Support For Border Wall Jumps As More American Blame Trump For Shutdown

      By Chris White - Support for a proposed border wall has increased since January 2018, even as more Americans are blaming President Donald Trump for the partial shutdown, according to a Washington Post poll published Sunday. Trump’s wall is winning adherents as support has increased over the past year. Nearly 42 percent of subjects say they support a wall, which is up from 34 percent currently last year. Slightly more than half of Americans (54 percent) oppose the idea, down from a high of 63 percent in 2018. The debate is a partisan one, the poll shows. Nearly 27 percent of the 54 percent of people who oppose the wall say Democrats should continue to resist Trump’s demands for $5.4 billion for the barrier, while another 23 percent believe Democratic lawmakers should compromise. Democrats appear more willing to compromise. Slightly more than 42 percent of Democrats who oppose the wall say lawmakers should resist, while 37 percent say they should be more conciliatory. About 58 percent Republicans support the wall and say Trump should demand funding, compared with 22 percent who say he should cave on the barrier. Trump should refrain from championing the new level of support, however, as the poll notes areas of concern for the president. For instance, more than half of Americans (53 percent) say Trump and the Republicans are at fault for the government shutdown, and 29 percent blame the Democrats in Congress. The president told Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer that the shutdown could last nearly a year. The WaPo-ABC poll was conducted Jan. 8-11 among a random sample of 788 Americans – the results had a margin of error of plus or minus 4.5 percentage points. Content created by The Daily Caller News Foundation is available without charge to any eligible news publisher that can provide a large audience. For licensing opportunities of our original content, please contact [email protected] Support For Border Wall Jumps As More American Blame Trump For Shutdown is original content from Conservative Daily News - Where Americans go for news, current events and commentary they can trust - Conservative News Website for U.S. News, Political Cartoons and more. View the original full article

      in Political Conservative News

    • Woman Loses Her Baby after Doctor Accidentally Prescribes Her an Abortion Pill

      A woman in California is suing her doctor and pharmacy for accidentally prescribing and filling a prescription for an abortion pill. View the full article

      in Christian Current Events

×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.