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MennoSota

Open Theism vs Process Theology Debate

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There will be a debate between Greg Boyd (OT) and Tripp Fuller (PT) at a popular bar in St Paul, MN later this month. They are charging $20 a person to listen to the debate.

How many people would spend that money to listen to one guy say that God doesn't know the future while the other guy says that God is evolving over time?

 

I equate this to watching two children argue over which dad is weaker.

 

I can't imagine believing either position since they both deny the Sovereignty of God.

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Thanks for this information. I sometimes wonder what it would be like to have a hardcore Mormon go at it with a really dedicated Jehovah's Witness. The things that would be discussed.....man, you talk about confusion.

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There will be a debate between Greg Boyd (OT) and Tripp Fuller (PT) at a popular bar in St Paul, MN later this month. They are charging $20 a person to listen to the debate.

How many people would spend that money to listen to one guy say that God doesn't know the future while the other guy says that God is evolving over time?

 

I equate this to watching two children argue over which dad is weaker.

 

I can't imagine believing either position since they both deny the Sovereignty of God.

 

Hmm, now let me see, go to a popular bar in St. Paul and pay a $20 cover charge to listen to two guys duke it out over whose version of "God isn't sovereign" is best :RpS_confused:

 

Well, let me think ................................... nah! :RpS_rolleyes:

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If it were free I might go just to chuckle and weep at the same time.

 

A distant cousin of my wife shared the event on facebook. She's a liberal, progressive pastor at a rainbow church in Minneapolis so she's excited because those philosophies fit with her narrative that the human condition is essentially good and God loves all humans.

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If it were free I might go just to chuckle and weep at the same time.

 

A distant cousin of my wife shared the event on facebook. She's a liberal, progressive pastor at a rainbow church in Minneapolis so she's excited because those philosophies fit with her narrative that the human condition is essentially good and God loves all humans.

 

Wow, that must make for some interesting family reunions :RpS_cool:

 

Alright, you talked me into it. We'll meet there an hour before the "show". I'll just bring my laugh track though, cause I can't imagine we're going to need any help crying :RpS_crying:.

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You know, I get why Clark Pinnock's theology went south (Alzheimer's disease), but I wonder what excuse these two guys have?

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You know, I get why Clark Pinnock's theology went south (Alzheimer's disease), but I wonder what excuse these two guys have?

 

I think they are desperately attempting to grasp why evil exists and reduce the number of sinners God would consider to be evil. If God is evolving and doesn't know the future, perhaps they can sneak into heaven...as is. :cool:

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I think they are desperately attempting to grasp why evil exists and reduce the number of sinners God would consider to be evil. If God is evolving and doesn't know the future, perhaps they can sneak into heaven...as is. :cool:

 

Sadly, you are probably right about that! What is even sadder however is considering what the Lord said in Matthew 23:15 to some other fellows who were trying to 'sneak people in' through a back door as well :RpS_sad:

 

Yours and His,

David

 

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I might find it interesting to listen to such a debate if I didn't have to pay anything, but there is no way I would pay $20 for the privilege.

 

...if the $20 included free beverages and appetizers... :cool:

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