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John Calvin puts forward a very simple reason why love is the greatest gift: “Because faith and hope are our own: love is diffused among others.” In other words, faith and hope benefit the possessor, but love always benefits another. In John 13:34–35 Jesus says, “A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.” Love always requires an “other” as an object; love cannot remain within itself, and that is part of what makes love the greatest gift.
William

Best arguments for Covenant/Household Baptism

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4 minutes ago, davidtaylorjr said:

It also does not say that her children were infants, nor that they did not also believe.

 

 To assert that they were infants is simply an assertion without proof. A "could be" is the best argument I've seen for this practice but that it not a good foundation to base a doctrine on.

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2 minutes ago, Becky said:

Edited it again 

That's fine, but you still assume that infants were there and you simply do not know that. Granted, we don't know that they weren't there either. But you should assume there were in order to fit a theoogical construct that you have to import from a different covenant because there happen to be certain parallels between the two.

2 minutes ago, Faber said:

 

 To assert that they were infants is simply an assertion without proof. A "could be" is the best argument I've seen for this practice but that it not a good foundation to base a doctrine on.

Exactly

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Different covenant same God. 

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4 hours ago, davidtaylorjr said:

Yes, that is what the New Covenant teaches.

At the very least a very simple Baptist view on New Covenant doctrine. One which emphasizes the "act" of faith rather than the grace received through faith.

 

Let's address a very literalistic approach with a simplistic principle when approaching Scripture which is to only acknowledge what is explicitly said. All I ask for is consistency. 

 

4 hours ago, davidtaylorjr said:

That's fine, but you still assume that infants were there and you simply do not know that. Granted, we don't know that they weren't there either. But you should assume there were in order to fit a theoogical construct that you have to import from a different covenant because there happen to be certain parallels between the two.

 

With regard to what is only explicitly stated how does one reconcile allowing women to partake of communion? Please be consistent and not reason and refrain from inference, allusions, parallelism, and above all do not assume women partake of communion just because they are in the audience. Please do not try to fit a theological construct that you have imported from an "ordinance" (Baptism) into communion.

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5 hours ago, Faber said:

 

 To assert that they were infants is simply an assertion without proof. A "could be" is the best argument I've seen for this practice but that it not a good foundation to base a doctrine on.

And is that because infants need demonstrate faith like adults rather than adults receiving the kingdom like a child and having faith as small as a mustard seed?

 

Any child that causes an adult to stumble would be bettered drowned in the sea with a millstone tied around their neck.

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9 hours ago, davidtaylorjr said:

That's fine, but you still assume that infants were there and you simply do not know that. Granted, we don't know that they weren't there either. But you should assume there were in order to fit a theoogical construct that you have to import from a different covenant because there happen to be certain parallels between the two.

I read what is written . You assume what is not written . No more on this from me. 

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7 hours ago, William said:

At the very least a very simple Baptist view on New Covenant doctrine. One which emphasizes the "act" of faith rather than the grace received through faith.

You could say the same thing about the Lord's Supper. That is a focus on action as well. So this is a nonsense argument.

 

7 hours ago, William said:

With regard to what is only explicitly stated how does one reconcile allowing women to partake of communion? Please be consistent and not reason and refrain from inference, allusions, parallelism, and above all do not assume women partake of communion just because they are in the audience. Please do not try to fit a theological construct that you have imported from an "ordinance" (Baptism) into communion.

Because Paul writes about taking the Lord's Supper to the whole church in Corinth. Men and Women.

 

6 hours ago, William said:

And is that because infants need demonstrate faith like adults rather than adults receiving the kingdom like a child and having faith as small as a mustard seed?

You keep bringing up a childlike faith, continually taking a passage out of its context when referring to suffer not the children to come unto Me. Yes, there must be a profession of faith.

 

 

5 minutes ago, Becky said:

You assume what is not written

No, that is not true. I am also going by what is actually written, and not importing an Old Covenant practice into the New Covenant because of things that are not written in the New Covenant.

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7 hours ago, davidtaylorjr said:

You could say the same thing about the Lord's Supper. That is a focus on action as well. So this is a nonsense argument. 

Oh, but the Covenant cannot be the focus on action from household heads.

7 hours ago, davidtaylorjr said:

Because Paul writes about taking the Lord's Supper to the whole church in Corinth. Men and Women. 

Peter addresses the house of Israel. Men, Women, and Children.

7 hours ago, davidtaylorjr said:

You keep bringing up a childlike faith, continually taking a passage out of its context when referring to suffer not the children to come unto Me. Yes, there must be a profession of faith. 

Like the little children had to do before approaching Jesus? The same children which the kingdom of heaven belonged?

 

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4 minutes ago, William said:

Peter addresses the house of Israel. Men, Women, and Children.

What references specifically are you referring to?

 

4 minutes ago, William said:

Like the little children had to do before approaching Jesus? The same children which the kingdom of heaven belonged?

You seem to be caught up on children, not sure why. Do you think I don't believe children can make a profession of faith?

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31 minutes ago, davidtaylorjr said:

What references specifically are you referring to?

I am referring to the contextual audience in Acts chapter 2 surrounding verses 38-39.

 

31 minutes ago, davidtaylorjr said:

You seem to be caught up on children, not sure why. Do you think I don't believe children can make a profession of faith?

I am caught up with respect to the audience. The house of Israel which were Covenant Jews. Men Women and Children.

 

I believe you think children need make a profession of faith before receiving the sign and seal of the New Covenant because there is no explicit mention of children receiving baptism. What you call a none sense argument is indeed one but one gains traction by selectively applying such a simplistic principle of interpretation. All I am asking for is consistency.

 

You're dragging the entire church of Corinth into the equation and suggest that Women belonged to the church. I am dragging the entire house of Israel that was in front of Peter and likewise suggesting that Males of any age received the Mark of circumcision and all of them (Women and Children) the sign and seal of the OT Covenant. 

 

I suspect that now that Children have lost their place in the NT Covenant, using the same simplistic principles an argument against my position could be made that only adult males are rightfully transferred as females had not the Mark of the Old Covenant. As you stated "we assume there were in order to fit a theoogical construct that you have to import from a different covenant because there happen to be certain parallels between the two." In order to not do so I asked that no parallel be made between Baptism and Communion. If you're going to suggest that the audience of Corinth were members of the Corinth church and were united by the Baptism sign and seal (Men and Women) I ask that you're consistent and recognize the house of Israel Peter is addressing, the Covenant language and allusion to the sign and seal of the Covenant whose membership includes Men Women and Children.

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3 minutes ago, William said:

I am referring to the contextual audience in Acts chapter 2 surrounding verses 38-39.

Ok let's look at this passage. You are reading things into it that are not there.  And, for the sake of argument, let's say that children were definitely present at this meeting since the text does not specify. The passage does not say to baptize your children. Not at all. What does it actually say? Repent and be baptized. This promise is for you, for your children, and to all the world.  In other words, the promise is for those there hearing, future generations of the Jews, and for all the world including gentiles. Nowhere does it say, and you will not find one verse that does say, that we should baptize someone who has not repented.  It doesn't say, or even imply, it in this verse or any other.

 

11 minutes ago, William said:

I believe you think children need make a profession of faith before receiving the sign and seal of the New Covenant because there is no explicit mention of children receiving baptism

Actually, I believe that because that is what Scripture, including the references you posted in this post, say. They say repent and be baptized.

 

12 minutes ago, William said:

What you call a none sense argument is indeed one but one gains traction by selectively applying such a simplistic principle of interpretation. All I am asking for is consistency.

I'm not sure how I have been inconsistent.

 

12 minutes ago, William said:

You're dragging the entire church of Corinth into the equation and suggest that Women belonged to the church. I am dragging the entire house of Israel that was in front of Peter and likewise suggesting that Males of any age were circumcised and received mark and all of them the sign and seal of the OT Covenant. 

Here is the problem. The addressing of Corinth does not single out a certain section of the audience with regard to the Lord's Supper. Peter actually does single out a certain section of the audience he had.  Those who repent, they are to be baptized. You are comparing apples and oranges by trying to make that out to me being inconsistent.

 

13 minutes ago, William said:

I suspect that now that Children have lost their place in the NT Covenant, using the same simplistic principles an argument against my position could be made that only adult males are rightfully transferred as females had not the mark of the Old Covenant.

Again, that only happens if you ignore the context of the immediate and try to force a transfer of the Old Covenant to the New Covenant. The Old Covenant was complete. The New Covenant was now in place. Nowhere do we find any indication that it is transferring or morphing the Old into the New. They are two different covenants.

15 minutes ago, William said:

That's why I ask, as you stated "we assume there were in order to fit a theoogical construct that you have to import from a different covenant because there happen to be certain parallels between the two." In order to not do so I asked that no parallel be made between Baptism and Communion.

I'm not sure why you think I am making a parallel between baptism and communion other than that they are sacraments.

 

15 minutes ago, William said:

If you're going to suggest that the audience of Corinth were members of the Corinth church and were united by the Baptism sign and seal (Men and Women) I ask that you're consistent and recognize the house of Israel Peter is addressing, the Covenant language and allusion to the Seal of the Covenant whose membership includes Men Women and Children.

I've never said it does not include children. However, it only includes children who have professed faith in Christ.

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22 minutes ago, davidtaylorjr said:

Ok let's look at this passage. You are reading things into it that are not there. 

And the only way you can come to that conclusion is by applying a literalistic simplistic principle which ignores inference, allusions, and parallelism. If I reject those principles and throw my hands up in the air and concur that Peter had no intention of using these methods then I'd hand the verses over to the Baptist. But then I'd need deal with others such as Colossians 2 where Paul is actually explicitly making inference with respect to an allusion in parallelism.

 

22 minutes ago, davidtaylorjr said:

I'm not sure how I have been inconsistent.

You're going into inconsistency now because you're reasoning rather than breaking from the principles you held elsewhere. That makes me believe you're being selective.

 

22 minutes ago, davidtaylorjr said:

Here is the problem. The addressing of Corinth does not single out a certain section of the audience with regard to the Lord's Supper. Peter actually does single out a certain section of the audience he had.  Those who repent, they are to be baptized. You are comparing apples and oranges by trying to make that out to me being inconsistent.

Peter is addressing Covenant Jews, household heads (Peter addresses the house of Israel), and further obvious from the allusion made to Genesis 17. The requirement of faith like the Covenant being alluded to was demonstrated by Abraham, yet Abraham's children received the mark, sign, and seal of the Old Covenant. Likewise the audience in which Peter is addressing were members of that very Covenant which included Men, Women, and Children.

 

You are comparing apples (Covenant and Household heads) to oranges (women and children) which ought to be all apples because they were included in the house of Israel. There's also the inconsistency. If Acts 2:38-39 were not directed to Covenant and household heads then none of this applies to children under such a literalistic simplistic approach because children have no children. How is that you're using Repentance as a qualification but not having children with regard to the intended recipient?

 

And Peter said to them, “Repent and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins, and you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit. 39 For the promise is for you and for your children and for all who are far off, everyone whom the Lord our God calls to himself.”

 

22 minutes ago, davidtaylorjr said:

I'm not sure why you think I am making a parallel between baptism and communion other than that they are sacraments.

That's not what I suggested. But you're pointing to the Corinth church. Either all there are the Corinth church or only those that received the sign and seal of Baptism are considered the Corinth church.

 

22 minutes ago, davidtaylorjr said:

I've never said it does not include children. However, it only includes children who have professed faith in Christ.

I didn't realize the Corinth church were Baptist.

 

 

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56 minutes ago, davidtaylorjr said:

Nowhere does it say, and you will not find one verse that does say, that we should baptize someone who has not repented.  It doesn't say, or even imply, it in this verse or any other.

 This is simply undeniable.

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13 minutes ago, Faber said:

 This is simply undeniable.

Of course it would be absurd to baptize a Covenant or household head that does not repent and believe (unbeliever). The argument is whether children are now excluded from the Covenant or household sign and seal of baptism. Though only one believing spouse defines the household and such unions were considered Christian (children included) 1 Corinthians 7:14.

 

Consider Owen’s (slightly edited) principle and third point supporting infant baptism based on the argument of/from silence:

 

…A spiritual privilege once granted by God unto any cannot be changed, disannulled, or abrogated, without a special divine revocation of it, or the substitution of a greater privilege and mercy in the place of it; for:

 

1. Who shall disannul what God has granted? What he has put together who shall put asunder? To abolish or take away any grant of privilege made by him to the church, without his own express revocation of it, is to deny his sovereign authority.

2. To say a privilege so granted may be revoked, even by God himself, without the substitution of a greater privilege and mercy in the place of it, is contrary to the goodness of God, his love and care unto his church, [and] contrary to his constant course of proceeding with it from the foundation of the world, wherein he went on in the enlargement and increase of its privileges until the coming of Christ. And to suppose it under the gospel is contrary to all his promises, the honor of Christ, and a multitude of express testimonies of Scripture.

 

Thus was it with the privileges of the temple and the worship of it granted to the Jews; they were not, they could not be, taken away without an express revocation, and the substitution of a more glorious spiritual temple and worship in their place.

 

But now the spiritual privilege of a right unto and a participation of the initial seal of the covenant was granted by God unto the infant seed of Abraham, Gen. 17:10, 12. This grant, therefore, must stand firm for ever, unless men can prove or produce:

 

1. An express revocation of it by God himself; which none can do either directly or indirectly, in terms or any pretense of consequence.

2. An instance of a greater privilege or mercy granted unto them in the place of it; which they do not once pretend unto, but leave the seed of believers, while in their infant state, in the same condition with those of pagans and infidels; expressly contrary to God’s covenant.

 

All this contest, therefore, is to deprive the children of believers of a privilege once granted to them by God, never revoked, as to the substance of it, assigning nothing in its place; which is contrary to the goodness, love, and covenant of God, especially derogatory to the honor of Jesus Christ and the gospel.

 

John Owen. The Works of John Owen. Ed. William H. Goold. Vol. 16. Edinburgh: T&T Clark. Print.

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40 minutes ago, William said:

Of course it would be absurd to baptize a Covenant or household head that does not repent and believe (unbeliever). The argument is whether children are now excluded from the Covenant or household sign and seal of baptism. Though only one believing spouse defines the household and such unions were considered Christian (children included) 1 Corinthians 7:14.

 Just because the head of te household is Christian doesn't necessitate the sons and daughters will be (Matthew 10:35-36).

 

 1 Corinthians 7:14

 A. T. Robertson: If the relations of the parents be holy, the child's birth must be holy also (not illegitimate). "He is not assuming that the child of a Christian parent would be baptized; that would spoil rather than help his argument, for it would imply that the child was not hagios till it was baptized. The verse throws no light on the question of infant baptism" (Robertson and Plummer).

http://www.godrules.net/library/robert/robert1cor7.htm

 

 In my reply to what John Owen wrote I would say that Hebrews 8:13 teaches that the entire Old Covenant laws have been abrogated. Christians do not have to obey any of their commands or practices. Christians are under a New Covenant. If a command from the Old Covenant (any part) is repeated in the New Covenant then Christians are to obey it/them.

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3 minutes ago, Faber said:

 Just because the head of te household is Christian doesn't necessitate the sons and daughters will be (Matthew 10:35-36).

Same applies to the OT Covenant. Covenant status isn't being equated to salvation by me. But it seems that it is both of your points. No doubt in my mind that the opposition in this thread has failed to entertain the other theological perspective. I can definitely see from and even emulate Baptist theology, but I wholeheartedly reject it.

 

At this point I'm going to leave this theology which was taught by both Peter and Paul to Peter's own words when he suggested that some things are hard to understand.

 

God bless,

William

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3 minutes ago, William said:

At this point I'm going to leave this theology which was taught by both Peter and Paul to Peter's own words when he suggested that some things are hard to understand.

 I understand a false belief but that doesn't mean I will embrace it.

 

 I never once asserted that Covenant status equals salvation. This is simply a straw man to detract from the fact that one must repent first before they are water baptized.

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30 minutes ago, Faber said:

 I never once asserted that Covenant status equals salvation.

So you're not equating baptism as evidence of salvation (present reality)?

 

30 minutes ago, Faber said:

This is simply a straw man to detract from the fact that one must repent first before they are water baptized.

You stated that one must display fruits of the Holy Spirit (regeneration) before receiving the Holy Spirit (God) in the context of Covenant baptism in Acts 2.

 

I specifically pointed this out in the past by asking for clarification and you simply affirmed.

 

And after reinstating the same qualification you think my observation is a straw man?

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55 minutes ago, William said:

Same applies to the OT Covenant.

Again, this is a different covenant. We are no longer in the Old Covenant.  

 

56 minutes ago, William said:

No doubt in my mind that the opposition in this thread has failed to entertain the other theological perspective. I can definitely see from and even emulate Baptist theology, but I wholeheartedly reject it.

We have entertained it, and find it to not be supported in Scripture.

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36 minutes ago, davidtaylorjr said:

Again, this is a different covenant. We are no longer in the Old Covenant.  

 

We have entertained it, and find it to not be supported in Scripture.

Keyword search hermeneutic: different covenant. Therefore, covenants no longer have signs and seals? Or do they maintain covenant characteristics and only the sign and seal are changed with respect to recipients?

 

Seems to me that Paul went to great lengths "bridging" between Covenants so that OT Covenant recipients could transfer to the NT Covenant. Where you're seemingly emphasizing "different" I am leaning towards the NT Covenant while having in mind the OT recipients crossing that bridge. Men Women and Children, the house of Israel.

 

Unscriptural? What you should suggest is that Covenant Theology is rejected by your approaches (principles and methods of interpretation) to Scripture. We're taking this up in PM among staff.

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1 hour ago, William said:

Therefore, covenants no longer have signs and seals?

Never said that. I'm just saying it doesn't work the same way as it did in the OT. 

 

1 hour ago, William said:

Or do they maintain covenant characteristics and only the sign and seal are changed with respect to recipients?

It's two totally different Covenants. If you were still alive at the time, you had to accept Christ. 

 

1 hour ago, William said:

Seems to me that Paul went to great lengths "bridging" between Covenants so that OT Covenant recipients could transfer to the NT Covenant. Where you're seemingly emphasizing "different" I am leaning towards the NT Covenant while having in mind the OT recipients crossing that bridge. Men Women and Children, the house of Israel.

They still had to meet the requirements of the New Covenant.

 

 

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3 hours ago, William said:

So you're not equating baptism as evidence of salvation (present reality)?

 Baptism is evidence of salvation but it doesn't equal salvation. The same with partaking the Lord's Supper.

3 hours ago, William said:

You stated that one must display fruits of the Holy Spirit (regeneration) before receiving the Holy Spirit (God) in the context of Covenant baptism in Acts 2.

 I'm sorry, but I don't remember stating that.

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    • Five elements of water baptism in the bible

      1 The baptist should baptize the believer in the name of Jesus but not in the name of Father, Son and Holy Spirit. The name of Father, Son and the Holy Spirit is Jesus. Jesus is the only God dwelling in the world and appearing to human in flesh. Jesus has flesh body and die in cross for our sin. The sinless lamb became a sacrifice on Passover for saving human’s life. He burdens our sin and takes over the punishment of death. Then we may gain the salvation by the faith in Jesus. Peter said in Acts 2:38 “ Repent and be baptized, every one of you, in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins. And you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit. In Acts 10:48 “ So he ordered that they be baptized in the name of Jesus Christ. Then they asked Peter to stay with them for a few days.”   2 The water baptism can only be conducted in living water like river, sea or lake. Water baptism conducted in pool is sin. “ My people have committed two sins: They have forsaken me, the spring of living water, and have dug their own pools, broken pools that cannot hold water.” Jeremiah 2:13.  Jesus set an example for us who was baptized by John Baptist in Jordan river. John Baptist also baptized others in River called Aenon. Baptism in living water also indicates Jesus is living water of our life. “On that day a fountain will be opened to the house of David and the inhabitants of Jerusalem, to cleanse them from sin the impurity.” Zechariah 13:1.   3 The water baptism in bile is full immersion. The Greek word from which we get the word baptism is “baptizo”, which literally means “to immerse”.  All water baptisms in scripture were by full immersion.  Jesus was water baptized by being fully immersed in the water and rising out of it. (Matthew 3:16, Mark 1:10, Acts 8:38-39). Full immersion means we die together with Jesus.  “ Or don’t you know that all of us who were baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into his death” Roman 6:3. Submersion in the water symbolizes the death and burial while raising out of the water is a picture how Jesus raised us and gave us a fresh start in life. Sprinkling or any other ways of baptism were not matching the scriptures of bible.   4 When receiving water baptism, the believer should bow his head. Water baptism means die with Jesus. In Roman 6:4-5” We were therefore buried with him through baptism into death.  For if we have been united with him in a death like his, we will certainly also be united with him in a resurrection like his.” What is the shape of Jesus when he die in cross? John 19:30 “When he had received the drink, Jesus said, “ It is finished.” With that, he bowed his head and gave up his spirit.” It is also a sinner’s altitude to bow the head.   5 The baptist must be baptized with the Holy Spirit before baptizing others. John 20:22-23 “ And with that he breather on them and said, receive the Holy Spirit. If you forgive anyone’s sins, their sins are forgiven; if you do not forgive them, they are not forgiven.” It is Holy Spirit forgiving sin. People without being baptized with the Holy Spirit cannot forgive sins. Only the ones who have been baptized with the Holy Spirit can baptize others with the function of washing up sin. Water baptism has water, Jesus blood and Holy Spirit. 1 John 5:6-8 “ This is the one who came by water and blood- Jesus Christ. He did not come by water only, but by water and blood. And it is the Spirit who testifies, because the Spirit is the truth. For there are three that testify: the Spirit, the water and the blood; and the three are in agreement.”

      in Baptism

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