Jump to content

The Protestant Community

Christian and Theologically Protestant? Or, sincerely inquiring about the Protestant faith? Welcome to Christforums the Christian Protestant community. You'll first need to register in order to join our community. Create or respond to threads on your favorite topics and subjects. Registration takes less than a minute, it's simple, fast, and free! Enjoy the fellowship! God bless, Christforums' Staff
Register now

Fenced Community

Christforums is a Protestant Christian forum, open to Bible-believing Christians such as Presbyterians, Lutherans, Reformed, Baptists, Church of Christ members, Pentecostals, Anglicans. Methodists, Charismatics, or any other conservative, Nicene- derived Christian Church. We do not solicit cultists of any kind, including Mormons, Jehovah's Witnesses, Eastern Lightning, Falun Gong, Unification Church, Aum Shinrikyo, Christian Scientists or any other non-Nicene, non-Biblical heresy.
Register now

Christian Fellowship

John Calvin puts forward a very simple reason why love is the greatest gift: “Because faith and hope are our own: love is diffused among others.” In other words, faith and hope benefit the possessor, but love always benefits another. In John 13:34–35 Jesus says, “A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.” Love always requires an “other” as an object; love cannot remain within itself, and that is part of what makes love the greatest gift.
Sign in to follow this  
Fenderen

Having second thoughts!

Recommended Posts

Dear forum!

 

I will start with a short introduction to who I am and followed by my thoughts. I have a bachelor degree in Marketing and Media. I work with strategic marketing for a living and I've always been fascinated by coding your own website as well as "assembling" it with content management systems (CMS) like wordpress and alike.

Last week I was contacted by an old friend from highschool. He asked me to help him out with his website and as a good friend and christian I agreed to help him. He wanted a website for his newly started business. As we got into details with what he was after I got the feeling that something was wrong with this "job". I started asking questions to what his new website/company should be selling and at first he wasn't too happy about letting me know. After a while I found out that it was an affiliate website - one of those that compares consumer loans and brings people into debt like MONEYBANKER.

 

When I found out what the company was all about I had second thoughts! However as Deuteronomy and Matthew says heal the sick, open wide your hand to your brother? What would you do in my situation? Should I help my friend out and go against my faith or tell him that this is a project that I cannot help him with due to moral reasons and thereby cast out the "demons"? [h=3]Deuteronomy 15:11[/h] "For there will never cease to be poor in the land. Therefore I command you, ‘You shall open wide your hand to your brother, to the needy and to the poor, in your land." [h=3]Matthew 10:8[/h] "Heal the sick, raise the dead, cleanse lepers, cast out demons. You received without paying; give without pay."

 

Please help me - guide me towards the correct answer/approach. I am in a time of needs!

Share this post


Link to post
Staff
Dear forum!

 

I will start with a short introduction to who I am and followed by my thoughts. I have a bachelor degree in Marketing and Media. I work with strategic marketing for a living and I've always been fascinated by coding your own website as well as "assembling" it with content management systems (CMS) like wordpress and alike.

Last week I was contacted by an old friend from highschool. He asked me to help him out with his website and as a good friend and christian I agreed to help him. He wanted a website for his newly started business. As we got into details with what he was after I got the feeling that something was wrong with this "job". I started asking questions to what his new website/company should be selling and at first he wasn't too happy about letting me know. After a while I found out that it was an affiliate website - one of those that compares consumer loans and brings people into debt like MONEYBANKER.

 

When I found out what the company was all about I had second thoughts! However as Deuteronomy and Matthew says heal the sick, open wide your hand to your brother? What would you do in my situation? Should I help my friend out and go against my faith or tell him that this is a project that I cannot help him with due to moral reasons and thereby cast out the "demons"? Deuteronomy 15:11

 

"For there will never cease to be poor in the land. Therefore I command you, ‘You shall open wide your hand to your brother, to the needy and to the poor, in your land." Matthew 10:8

 

"Heal the sick, raise the dead, cleanse lepers, cast out demons. You received without paying; give without pay."

 

Please help me - guide me towards the correct answer/approach. I am in a time of needs!

 

I and fellow Christians have fallen into the same situation. I am contacted and approached to do web work for others on a consistent basis. I refuse to do work for anyone that I believe promotes unethical business. It is my opinion that you should abandon ship if you believe the business to be unethical. If your brother leads you to sin, Fenderen, like a member in the body of Christ, then pluck out your eye or cut off your hand that you are reaching out with Matthew 5:29-30.

 

Seems like you're already past the point of letting your right hand know what your left hand is doing Matthew 6:3. Don't lose your righteousness, dear brother, when giving alms!

 

God bless,

William

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

The Bible says we should have nothing to do with any kind of immoral activities. It also says we should always keep our promises. When the Israelites conquered the land of Canaan God told them not to make any kind of treaty with the inhabitants. Joshua 9 tells how the Gibeonites tricked them into making a covenant by pretending to be from a land outside of Canaan. When they discovered the truth they had to honor their alliance with the Gibeonites because of their oath to help them. It appears you are faced with the same dilemma the Israelites faced.

 

Israel entered into an illegal covenant because they failed to ask God's guidance. You failed to find out what kind of business your friend was in before you agreed to help. It was wrong for you to promise to help him but now that you have done so you are bound by your promise. Even when we make mistakes God can use our mistakes to bring about good. Perhaps the best thing to do would be to keep your promise but while doing so try to show your friend that what he is doing is wrong. Also, pray that God will show you how to bring about some good from the situation you are in.

Share this post


Link to post

It is only natural to trust your friend, so finding out what he was doing must have been an unpleasant shock. Could you simply talk to him, say that you have found that what he is doing goes against your beliefs, and ask to be released from your promise? If you know any technologists whose beliefs this would not contravene, you could fulfil your promise by pointing him towards them. If he won't release you from your promise, even knowing you are unhappy, then I think you need to fulfil it.

 

Unfortunately, if he has come this far, you are extremely unlikely to be able to change his mind about this endeavour altogether. However the FCA rules about price comparison sites on loans are extremely stringent and tightened at the end of last year. It might be worth checking them, because if what he is planning contravenes those rules, he needs to be aware, and the site could not proceed anyway. If he is not religious, that might carry more weight with him.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Topics

    • 6 Thoughts On The Pittsburgh Synagogue Shooting, Anti-Semitism, And President Trump

      In the aftermath of the deadliest anti-Semitic shooting in American history in Pittsburgh on Saturday, the media have leapt to push the narrative that President Trump is somehow responsible. That’s a tough narrative to sell, given that the shooter was outspokenly anti-Trump – he was enraged at Trump for being too pro-Semitic, in fact. View the full article

      in Political Conservative News

    • 4 Thoughts On The Attempted Mail Bomber, And Why Everything Is Garbage Right Now

      So, now we know who was allegedly behind the attempted pipe bomb attacks against various and sundry Democrats in media and politics: a crazy 56-year-old guy with a long criminal history, a shocking number of pro-Trump bumper stickers on his van, and an inglorious record of criminal threats against various Democrats on his social media. Here’s a picture of Crazy Guy’s van: View the full article

      in Political Conservative News

    • How much should a preacher rely on the thoughts of others when preparing a sermon?

      by Brian Croft   All pastors are not tempted to preach someone else’s sermons, but most rely on the opinions, insights, and scholarly wisdom of others by way of commentaries, language tools, and theological writings. Let’s face it: we live in a blessed day as pastors. We have easy access to the thoughts of some of the most brilliant theological minds in history and can find them addressing just about any passage in the Bible. The temptation with access to these kinds of scholars is to seek their thoughts too soon before we have formulated our own thoughts about the passage we seek to preach. When should a preacher consult the insightful words of these scholars?   I think the wisdom of nineteenth century English Pastor Andrew Fuller given over 200 years ago is still just as sound in our commentary-saturated time today as it was in his day when the resources were much more sparse. Here are Fuller’s words when he wrote them in a letter to a young pastor:   The method I pursued, was, first to read the text carefully over, and as I went on, to note down what first struck me as the meaning. After reducing these notes into something like a scheme of the passage, I examined the best experts I could procure, and, comparing my own first thoughts with theirs, was a better able to judge of their justness. Some of them were confirmed, some corrected, and many added to them…But to go first to expositors is to preclude the exercise of your own judgment.[1]   Pastors need to be grateful for the abundance of commentaries and theological writings about most any passage we would set to preach to our congregations. Allow them to confirm, even correct our own thoughts we have formulated in our own study, but guard from relying too much on them. Busy pastors can be tempted to laziness and preach these great men, instead of doing the hard work that allows the Spirit of the living God to work that text in us as a word that would speak specifically to our flock, and thus bring us to the place where we would preach it to our unique congregation in the power of Christ. Authentic, Biblical, Spirit-filled preaching where the preacher has been deeply impacted by the passage he preaches is just as needed today as it was in Fuller’s day. I am convinced Fuller’s counsel will take us and keep us on the right path to get us there in our own pulpits as he calls us to preach our own material.   [1] Fuller, Andrew. The Complete Works of the Rev. Andrew Fuller with a Memoir of His Life by Andrew Gunton Fuller. 3 vols. Edited by Joseph Belcher. Philadelphia American Baptist Publication Society, 1845 Repr., Harrisonburg, VA: Sprinkle, 1988. 3:201

      in Ministry and Teaching

    • Zuckerberg Begins Testimony By Reminding Senators He Knows All Their Deepest Thoughts, Hopes, Fears

      WASHINGTON, D.C.—Kicking off his Senate hearing with a prepared statement Tuesday, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg ominously reminded everyone present that he is intimately familiar with all of their deepest thoughts, hopes, and fears. “This bipartisan committee has gathered here to ask me questions. Please remember that I need to ask you none,” the social media […]   The post Zuckerberg Begins Testimony By Reminding Senators He Knows All Their Deepest Thoughts, Hopes, Fears appeared first on The Babylon Bee.       More...

      in Christian Satire

    • Intrusive thoughts

      Intrusive thoughts are not sin.   The battle wages within. Ephesians 6:12 For we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this world, against spiritual wickedness in high places.   Of Christ...   Mark 1:13 And he was there in the wilderness forty days, tempted of Satan; and was with the wild beasts; and the angels ministered unto him.   Hebrews 4:15-16 For we have not an high priest which cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities; but was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin. Let us therefore come boldly unto the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy, and find grace to help in time of need.   I’ve heard it said “There are two wolves within you. One Good, and one evil. The one you feed the most will become the strongest.   Intrusive thoughts are not sin... Unless we choose to feed them.   James 1: 14-15 But every man is tempted, when he is drawn away of his own lust, and enticed. 15 Then when lust hath conceived, it bringeth forth sin: and sin, when it is finished, bringeth forth death.  

      in Morality and Laws

×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.