Jump to content

The Protestant Community

Christian and Theologically Protestant? Or, sincerely inquiring about the Protestant faith? Welcome to Christforums the Christian Protestant community. You'll first need to register in order to join our community. Create or respond to threads on your favorite topics and subjects. Registration takes less than a minute, it's simple, fast, and free! Enjoy the fellowship! God bless, Christforums' Staff
Register now

Fenced Community

Christforums is a Protestant Christian forum, open to Bible-believing Christians such as Presbyterians, Lutherans, Reformed, Baptists, Church of Christ members, Pentecostals, Anglicans. Methodists, Charismatics, or any other conservative, Nicene- derived Christian Church. We do not solicit cultists of any kind, including Mormons, Jehovah's Witnesses, Eastern Lightning, Falun Gong, Unification Church, Aum Shinrikyo, Christian Scientists or any other non-Nicene, non-Biblical heresy.
Register now

Christian Fellowship

John Calvin puts forward a very simple reason why love is the greatest gift: “Because faith and hope are our own: love is diffused among others.” In other words, faith and hope benefit the possessor, but love always benefits another. In John 13:34–35 Jesus says, “A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.” Love always requires an “other” as an object; love cannot remain within itself, and that is part of what makes love the greatest gift.
Sign in to follow this  
ConfessionalLutheran

Church of the Brethren

Recommended Posts

It's yet another Germanic church that a family member ( my dad's Uncle John) joined up with decades ago. This one isn't too Sacramentally oriented and unless I miss my guess, they are Credo- Baptists who are part of the historical " peace churches" movement. Here's a Copy/ Paste of their practices and a link to their page:

[h=1]Brethren practices[/h]

Brethren have a long tradition of “gathering around the Word.” Taking the New Testament as our guide, we discuss what Jesus did—and why. Then we try to pattern our own lives after his.

 

“Where two or three are gathered together in my name,” Jesus promised, “there am I in the midst of them.” Through the practices described here, Brethren come together—as small groups or larger ones—in loving imitation of Jesus’ actions. At these times, we’re especially aware of God’s presence. We call these practices our ordinances, because we think of them as instructions from God.

 

Learn about Baptism * Love feast and communion * Feetwashing * Anointing [h=2]Baptism[/h] baptism-thumbnail.jpgFind printable resources

Before making any serious commitment—to marry, to accept a responsible office, to practice healthier living—a person considers the meaning and consequences of that choice. Often, he or she undergoes a public ceremony to acknowledge the momentous personal decision. For Brethren, the ordinance of “believers baptism” marks just such a deliberate, thoughtful commitment.

 

Choosing to follow the example of Jesus begins with repenting, or humbly re-examining one’s relationship with God. Jesus himself showed us the way: He asked to be baptized by John, and he instructed his disciples to baptize others who wanted to be symbolically “reborn” through God’s grace, into a new life of mature belief and service.

 

Three hundred years ago, the first Brethren chose adult baptism as their ceremonial response to God’s saving act—the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ. Today, in the presence of the congregation, a newly committed person kneels in the water of the baptistry, publicly acknowledges his or her decision, and is immersed three times forward, “in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.”

 

Through this symbolic cleansing and rebirth, the person becomes a full member of the Brethren congregation and of the larger body of Christ. The decision to be baptized indicates a willingness to take on both the joy and the responsibility of living Jesus’ teachings. [h=2]Love feast and communion[/h] lovefeast-thumbnail.jpgFind printable resources

In an act of great love, Jesus gave his life for ours. The Brethren, as Jesus’ followers, love God and each other—and take that love into the world. Once or twice a year, Brethren celebrate what the earliest Christians called agape: the outflowing love that seeks not to receive but to give.

 

Jesus taught us this practice, sharing with his disciples a last, loving meal the night before he died. He washed the disciples’ feet, ate supper with them, sought to draw them closer into the fold of his love, and offered them the symbolic bread and cup.

 

During love feast, we repeat these simple, meaningful acts. After reconciling any discord among ourselves, we lovingly wash each other’s feet, then enjoy a meal together. Quietly we share communion, the bread and the cup that remind us of Jesus’ great gift; we renew our commitment to follow his example of sacrificial love. Congregations may also observe the eucharist, or bread-and-cup communion, at other times and in other settings.

 

Love feast closes with a hymn; then follows the humble task of cleaning up, in which all are invited to participate. When we leave the feast, reunited in our dedication to Christ and to each other, the deep, nourishing love goes with us. [h=2]Feetwashing[/h]

Jesus knew that this evening, this meal, was the last time he and his twelve disciples would gather as a group. He wanted his followers to remember, in the difficult days ahead, why he had come and what he had taught them. When the disciples began to argue about which of them was more important, Jesus decided to make his lesson plain: Taking a towel and a basin of water, this great teacher knelt beside the first disciple—and did not stop until, like a lowly servant, he had washed the feet of each one there.

 

By including the service of feetwashing in our love feast, Brethren imitate Jesus’ actions and honor his lessons. No person ought to be greater than another, Jesus taught. Love has no need to prove status or position; love simply gives—and keeps on giving.

 

A symbolic, cleansing act, feetwashing prepares us for the meal and communion that follow. It reminds us that, in God’s sight, everyone needs loving attention, and everyone can offer that service to others. First we humbly accept attention and care from the one who washes our feet. Then we in turn wash someone else’s feet. After each act of feetwashing, the two people embrace and share a simple phrase of blessing.

 

In receiving this emblem of God’s cleansing grace, we remember that as followers of Jesus, we can help distribute God’s blessing to others—through steady, loving service, symbolically washing the feet of the world. [h=2]Anointing[/h] annointing-thumbnail.jpgFind printable resources

At some time, almost every person—even the most devout—may become anxious, despairing, or ill. Following instructions given in the New Testament, the Brethren practice an ordinance called anointing: the prayerful, loving application of oil to the forehead of someone in physical or spiritual need.

 

Most of the time, members take initiative to request anointing for themselves or for members of their family. Recently more and more people have discovered anointing as a powerful symbol for the full range of renewal and healing. People ask for anointing before surgery or during serious illness, and they also request it in times of grief, emotional turmoil, or brokenness in relationships.

 

The anointing service is usually conducted in a home or small-group setting, although some congregations use it in public worship. A time is provided for confession. Then the minister or other representative of the church applies oil three times to the forehead, symbolizing forgiveness of sin, strengthening of faith, and healing of body, mind, and spirit.

 

Finally the minister lays hands on the one to be anointed, sometimes inviting others present to do the same, and prays specifically for this person's expressed concern. The laying on of hands is a reminder that the whole congregation, whether present or not, joins in prayer and support. http://www.brethren.org/about/practices.html

 

Like the Baptists ( who were influenced by Puritanism and Anabaptism), the Brethren have a nice blend of two traditions ( Pietism and Anabaptism) in their theology. Their history goes back to the early eighteenth century in Schwarzenau, Germany, when eight people were rebaptized in a river.

 

Share this post


Link to post
It's yet another Germanic church that a family member ( my dad's Uncle John) joined up with decades ago. This one isn't too Sacramentally oriented and unless I miss my guess, they are Credo- Baptists who are part of the historical " peace churches" movement. Here's a Copy/ Paste of their practices and a link to their page:

[h=1]Brethren practices[/h]

Brethren have a long tradition of “gathering around the Word.” Taking the New Testament as our guide, we discuss what Jesus did—and why. Then we try to pattern our own lives after his.

 

“Where two or three are gathered together in my name,” Jesus promised, “there am I in the midst of them.” Through the practices described here, Brethren come together—as small groups or larger ones—in loving imitation of Jesus’ actions. At these times, we’re especially aware of God’s presence. We call these practices our ordinances, because we think of them as instructions from God.

 

Learn about Baptism * Love feast and communion * Feetwashing * Anointing [h=2]Baptism[/h] baptism-thumbnail.jpgFind printable resources

Before making any serious commitment—to marry, to accept a responsible office, to practice healthier living—a person considers the meaning and consequences of that choice. Often, he or she undergoes a public ceremony to acknowledge the momentous personal decision. For Brethren, the ordinance of “believers baptism” marks just such a deliberate, thoughtful commitment.

 

Choosing to follow the example of Jesus begins with repenting, or humbly re-examining one’s relationship with God. Jesus himself showed us the way: He asked to be baptized by John, and he instructed his disciples to baptize others who wanted to be symbolically “reborn” through God’s grace, into a new life of mature belief and service.

 

Three hundred years ago, the first Brethren chose adult baptism as their ceremonial response to God’s saving act—the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ. Today, in the presence of the congregation, a newly committed person kneels in the water of the baptistry, publicly acknowledges his or her decision, and is immersed three times forward, “in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.”

 

Through this symbolic cleansing and rebirth, the person becomes a full member of the Brethren congregation and of the larger body of Christ. The decision to be baptized indicates a willingness to take on both the joy and the responsibility of living Jesus’ teachings. [h=2]Love feast and communion[/h] lovefeast-thumbnail.jpgFind printable resources

In an act of great love, Jesus gave his life for ours. The Brethren, as Jesus’ followers, love God and each other—and take that love into the world. Once or twice a year, Brethren celebrate what the earliest Christians called agape: the outflowing love that seeks not to receive but to give.

 

Jesus taught us this practice, sharing with his disciples a last, loving meal the night before he died. He washed the disciples’ feet, ate supper with them, sought to draw them closer into the fold of his love, and offered them the symbolic bread and cup.

 

During love feast, we repeat these simple, meaningful acts. After reconciling any discord among ourselves, we lovingly wash each other’s feet, then enjoy a meal together. Quietly we share communion, the bread and the cup that remind us of Jesus’ great gift; we renew our commitment to follow his example of sacrificial love. Congregations may also observe the eucharist, or bread-and-cup communion, at other times and in other settings.

 

Love feast closes with a hymn; then follows the humble task of cleaning up, in which all are invited to participate. When we leave the feast, reunited in our dedication to Christ and to each other, the deep, nourishing love goes with us. [h=2]Feetwashing[/h]

Jesus knew that this evening, this meal, was the last time he and his twelve disciples would gather as a group. He wanted his followers to remember, in the difficult days ahead, why he had come and what he had taught them. When the disciples began to argue about which of them was more important, Jesus decided to make his lesson plain: Taking a towel and a basin of water, this great teacher knelt beside the first disciple—and did not stop until, like a lowly servant, he had washed the feet of each one there.

 

By including the service of feetwashing in our love feast, Brethren imitate Jesus’ actions and honor his lessons. No person ought to be greater than another, Jesus taught. Love has no need to prove status or position; love simply gives—and keeps on giving.

 

A symbolic, cleansing act, feetwashing prepares us for the meal and communion that follow. It reminds us that, in God’s sight, everyone needs loving attention, and everyone can offer that service to others. First we humbly accept attention and care from the one who washes our feet. Then we in turn wash someone else’s feet. After each act of feetwashing, the two people embrace and share a simple phrase of blessing.

 

In receiving this emblem of God’s cleansing grace, we remember that as followers of Jesus, we can help distribute God’s blessing to others—through steady, loving service, symbolically washing the feet of the world. [h=2]Anointing[/h] annointing-thumbnail.jpgFind printable resources

At some time, almost every person—even the most devout—may become anxious, despairing, or ill. Following instructions given in the New Testament, the Brethren practice an ordinance called anointing: the prayerful, loving application of oil to the forehead of someone in physical or spiritual need.

 

Most of the time, members take initiative to request anointing for themselves or for members of their family. Recently more and more people have discovered anointing as a powerful symbol for the full range of renewal and healing. People ask for anointing before surgery or during serious illness, and they also request it in times of grief, emotional turmoil, or brokenness in relationships.

 

The anointing service is usually conducted in a home or small-group setting, although some congregations use it in public worship. A time is provided for confession. Then the minister or other representative of the church applies oil three times to the forehead, symbolizing forgiveness of sin, strengthening of faith, and healing of body, mind, and spirit.

 

Finally the minister lays hands on the one to be anointed, sometimes inviting others present to do the same, and prays specifically for this person's expressed concern. The laying on of hands is a reminder that the whole congregation, whether present or not, joins in prayer and support. http://www.brethren.org/about/practices.html

 

Like the Baptists ( who were influenced by Puritanism and Anabaptism), the Brethren have a nice blend of two traditions ( Pietism and Anabaptism) in their theology. Their history goes back to the early eighteenth century in Schwarzenau, Germany, when eight people were rebaptized in a river.

 

I have about 100 problems with this, but I'm too tired to write them out. What's described and displayed about might look like Christianity, but it's not. I'm not saying that these folks aren't Christians. I'm just saying that they are a little mixed up.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

 

I have about 100 problems with this, but I'm too tired to write them out. What's described and displayed about might look like Christianity, but it's not. I'm not saying that these folks aren't Christians. I'm just saying that they are a little mixed up.

 

How is this un- Christian? I disagree with a lot of what they teach too ( seeing as how it's not Lutheran, but Brethren), but I'm pretty sure it doesn't put them outside the pale of Christianity. Do they deny the Trinity or the authority of Scripture? I don't see that.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

 

How is this un- Christian? I disagree with a lot of what they teach too ( seeing as how it's not Lutheran, but Brethren), but I'm pretty sure it doesn't put them outside the pale of Christianity. Do they deny the Trinity or the authority of Scripture? I don't see that.

 

If you don't see it, I could never explain it to you. On second thought. Take a look at my avatar. . .

 

Edited by thatbrian

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.