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Francis

Secular Music

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Apart from gospel music, how often should we be listening to secular music? I know that there are songs which are not gospel songs but they can teach people on how to live in our societies. Other songs talk about different values or advise on how to live peacefully with other people.

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Hi Francis, unfortunately, much of the music from my era was focused on sex, drugs, and rebellion in general. Much of today's music continues in that tradition but adds to it the glorification of things, like hate, murder, racism, and violence against women. As long as the secular music we choose to listen to doesn't violate the command we find in Philippians 4:8, I'd say it's probably fine to listen to almost anything you want to (PTL, there are still some things in the secular world that are truly lovely, honorable, praiseworthy, etc.).

 

Or here's a thought: Beethoven, Brahms, Bach, Mozart, Berlioz, Dvorak, Mendelssohn, Mahler, Tchaikovsky, Saint-Saens, Strauss, Rachmaninoff, Puccini, Verdi ..................................................

 

It's hard to get in much trouble if you choose to listen to those guys ;)

 

Yours and His,

David

 

 

"Brethren, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is right,

whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is of good

repute, if there is any excellence and if anything

worthy of praise, dwell on these things"

Philippians 4:8

 

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I don't feel like it's necessary to listen to religious music, so it's hard to pinpoint how often you should listen to it. I listen to all sorts of music. I tend to listen to religious music a few times a week, but it's definitely not the only genre that I listen to. I feel like there is no requirement to listen to music that talks about faith. It's a nice thing to do and it can definitely give you a positive message, rather than a basic message of every day life. I would say if you want to put this type of music into your routine, try and listen to it once a week or so. If anything, you could put a Christian radio station on. There are so many options out there that allow you to get in touch with your faith through music. :)

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I think a lot of the new age music is really inspirational and is very optimistic and quite meditational as well. They play a lot of acoustic,piano and flutes in this kind of music and it creates a peaceful atmosphere in your house and environment as well. There are a lot of genres of music out there though, and some of it makes you feel closer to God than others I guess?

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@Francis I totally agree with you. I had a similar discussion with my fellow youths and we could not reach a consensus. I feel that some secular tunes advise us on how we should live with others. Others are wedding love songs whereas others talk about culture. I think it would not do any harm in listening to such songs. However, one should be conscious not to fall for other tunes that lead us from God's grace. On the other hand, one should not be such a staunch believer that even listening to a wedding song becomes a sin to them.

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Use discernment. And if your into old rock n roll you might need to throw out most of your albums. There's a lot of occult meanings in the lyrics and rock n roll has a lot of influenc from a evil man named Alester Crowley. The term rock n roll came from teen agers having sex in their cars, hence the rocking and rolling.

There's a few bands/artest I would suggest: Seal, The Carpenters, Sixpence None the Richer, The Turrtels, and The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band.

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Use discernment. And if your into old rock n roll you might need to throw out most of your albums. There's a lot of occult meanings in the lyrics and rock n roll has a lot of influenc from a evil man named Alester Crowley. The term rock n roll came from teen agers having sex in their cars, hence the rocking and rolling.

There's a few bands/artest I would suggest: Seal, The Carpenters, Sixpence None the Richer, The Turrtels, and The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band.

 

Lets not forget that the King of Rock N Roll sang lots of Gospel music. :RpS_thumbsup: My favorite hymn that Elvis sang was Amazing Grace.

 

But I agree with you. Discernment is needed, especially if you have children. I grew up on Rap music and the first time I looked in the rear view mirror in my car to see my daughter strapped into the car seat while bumping big bass notes to idolatrous lyrics I began to hear the filth and what was polluting my daughter's young mind. Up until that point I never really listened to the lyrics but was more into the beats.

 

God bless,

William

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Lets not forget that the King of Rock N Roll sang lots of Gospel music. :RpS_thumbsup:

 

True, but elivis also made songs about getting laid in Vegas. After he died his body guards came out with a tape of him in his limo talking about having a "hot lunch" right after one of his Gospel concerts. When they told him he was on camera he said "Oh s*#t" and then jokingly sang a hymnal. Elivis also claimed to have a spirit guide that gave him power. Not trying to ruin music for anybody, but a lot of rock n roll really is devils music.

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True, but elivis also made songs about getting laid in Vegas. After he died his body guards came out with a tape of him in his limo talking about having a "hot lunch" right after one of his Gospel concerts. When they told him he was on camera he said "Oh s*#t" and then jokingly sang a hymnal. Elivis also claimed to have a spirit guide that gave him power. Not trying to ruin music for anybody, but a lot of rock n roll really is devils music.

 

Didn't know that. If I was to discern by the lifestyle of an entertainer I'd have to boycott just about every singer and actor. The less I know in these instances the better - truly, sometimes ignorance is bliss!

 

God bless,

William

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Apart from gospel music, how often should we be listening to secular music? I know that there are songs which are not gospel songs but they can teach people on how to live in our societies. Other songs talk about different values or advise on how to live peacefully with other people.

 

My personal preference is worship music. However, secular music often plays on the job and I grew up on secular music. If I listen to secular music I usually listen to the old folk songs of Joan Baez, Simon and Garfunkel, and a few others.

 

The Earth is the Lord's and the fullness therein. God can and does use secular music to speak to us if needed. For example, at a gymnastics meet I was working the judges' table, and the host was playing secular music. The song, Brown Eyed Girl, came on and a flood of tears began to well up within me. I met my wife, Linda, when I was 38 and she was 36. She is my soul mate. As I listened to the song, I realized the Lord was telling me that Linda was always my intended bride, even as a child. So, even though we did not meet until late in life, she has always been the wife of my youth.

 

In another story, we were visiting a house church before we had our own. I was unaware that people were intimidated by me. I am a large man and speak with authority due to 40 years of coaching gymnastics. I also am a avid reader of the Bible and have read it from cover to cover at least 8 or 9 times. So when I speak I say what I know. If I don't know, then I usually preface what I say with, it seems to me, or something like that. The leaders of the house church wanted me to qualify everything I said with , "in my opinion". If I know something, I am not going to say "in my opinion." So they kicked me out of the fellowship. When I told a friend about it, he asked me, "were your lips moving?" "Uh, yeah" "Then they should have known it was your opinion". Several days later the lyrics from Simon and Garfunkel's song, The Boxer, kept going through my mind. "A man hears what he wants to hear, then disregards the rest" and I realized the Lord was speaking to me through that song. It is true everywhere I go, and with everyone I speak, and, of course, it is also true about myself. We all hear what we want to hear, but following Christ means learning to get past that.

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Over the past 3 years or so I have stopped listening to much of the secular music I listened to in the past. The lyrics of songs are downright satanic and occultist many times so I am real careful of what I listen to and I know when to change the station.

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Use discernment. And if your into old rock n roll you might need to throw out most of your albums. There's a lot of occult meanings in the lyrics and rock n roll has a lot of influenc from a evil man named Alester Crowley.

 

Very true.

 

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