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wisnia2168

How do you share the Gospel to muslims?

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As in title. Do you have any experience in this subject? What do you tell them to show that Jesus Christ is the truth?

For now on I think that touching the subject of forgiveness or love could be worth the effort.

Waiting for your feedback! :)

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As in title. Do you have any experience in this subject? What do you tell them to show that Jesus Christ is the truth?

For now on I think that touching the subject of forgiveness or love could be worth the effort.

Waiting for your feedback! :)

 

I would think that addressing various passages that reject Jesus died on the Cross would need be addressed.

 

Sorry I can't be more help, but my actual interactions with Muslims has been very limited.

 

God bless,

William

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Thank you for useful resources!

Recently I made a contact with several muslims and that is why I asked :)

 

God bless you all!

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