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JEVS

7 reasons why we should pay our tithe.

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There are many questions going through the hearts of many Christians, and one of them is: are we supposed to pay tithe at this present dispensation? Tithing is a spiritual law of God that is recorded in the bible. The doctrine of tithing is a topic that many of us would not want to discuss. But it is one topic you are supposed to understand well enough and decide whether to obey it or not.

 

And all the tithe of the land, whether of the seed of the land or of the fruit of the tree, is the LORD’S. It is holy to the LORD. And concerning the tithe of the herd or of the flock, of whatsoever passes under the rod, the tenth one shall be holy to the LORD.– Leviticus 27:30, 32 (NKJV)

 

Will a man rob God? Yet you have robbed Me! But you say, ‘In what way have we robbed You?’ In tithes and offerings – Malachi 3:8 (NKJV)

 

But woe to you, Pharisees! For you tithe mint and rue and all manner of herbs, and pass by justice and the love of God. These you ought to have done, without leaving the others undone – Luke 11:42 (NKJV)

 

What is tithe? Tithe is ten percent of all your increase and it belongs to the Lord. It is holy to Him (Leviticus 27:30). In the time of the scriptures, the occupation of the people was mainly farming, both of crops and animals. As a result, the tithe was described based on seeds and livestock. However, the principle remains the same: tithe of all your increase (Deuteronomy 14:22).

 

So, if you are a salary earner – ten percent of your salary; a business man; – ten percent of your profit; and a farmer – ten percent of your yield or increase in livestock. If it is changed into money, it is still acceptable (Deuteronomy 14:25)

 

Your tithe is either ten percent of all your increase or it is not tithe at all. Anything less than ten percent is an offering.

 

Origin of tithing:

 

The first place that tithe was mentioned in the bible was in Genesis 14:18-20, where Abraham gave Melchizedek king of Salem a tithe of all, after his return from the defeat of Chedorlaomer and the kings who were with him. However, this spiritual law was made clearer under the laws of Moses (Leviticus 27:30-32). And more lights were shed on it in Malachi 3:8-12.

 

The Old Testament truly has most of the scriptures on the spiritual law of tithing but the New Testament also has some scriptures that back it up. As a matter of fact Jesus Christ approved of it in Luke 11:42 when He was rebuking the Pharisees. He said to them that they should have attended to justice and the love of God without leaving tithing undone......CONTINUE READING

http://www.everydaywiththelord.com/2...-blessing.html

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Well I would be very curious to see how many people out there are giving ten percent of their earnings to the church. My guess is not that many, if any at all, and so I just hope that nobody is out there judging others who are not giving to the church. Ever since I was a little kid I have always had a weird feeling about the tithe and the offering plate being passed around, and I am not sure what it is exactly, but it is still there today. I give, of course, and I have no issues with helping the church out in any way, but I cannot help but notice those feelings when I get them. Oh well, this is probably what I like to classify as a "me problem" so I will deal with that. Interesting stuff, though, and thanks for sharing.

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I started tithing again with my last paycheck, and this is a realization that hit me: when we give that first expenditure to God, it helps us re-prioritize the rest of our budget. I have struggled with giving in the past because I would take care of bills, go to a few social gatherings, take care of groceries and the like, and then be left with far less than the ten percent I initially wanted to give. So I just would not.

 

I think it is an active way to challenge our faith as well. I currently have $30 to my name and as much as I want to say I wish I still had that chunk of change that went to my church, I know that is not what put me here. It was my spending in other areas and lack of responsibility that did.

 

So, I am trying very hard to trust that everything is going to be ok, that I will make it to my next paycheck without being in true need of everything, and that I WILL give again.

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To add to this topic, I know people that are not active in a church but give to Christian charities instead. What are your thoughts on this? Should a tithe go to an actual church building, or does donating to a good cause "count"?

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Tithing in the OT was to support the Levites who had no land allocation. It is not required for Christians

 

The best advice on giving is by Paul in 1Cor16 and 2Cor 9

 

1Cor 16

1Now in regard to the collection for the holy ones, you also should do as I ordered the churches of Galatia.

2On the first day of the week each of you should set aside and save whatever one can afford, so that collections will not be going on when I come.

3And when I arrive, I shall send those whom you have approved with letters of recommendation to take your gracious gift to Jerusalem.

 

2Cor 9

5So I thought it necessary to encourage the brothers to go on ahead to you and arrange in advance for your promised gift, so that in this way it might be ready as a bountiful gift and not as an exaction.

6Consider this: whoever sows sparingly will also reap sparingly, and whoever sows bountifully will also reap bountifully.

7Each must do as already determined, without sadness or compulsion, for God loves a cheerful giver.

 

Note it’s about giving feely and according what one can afford - not tithing.

 

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I also like the story about the lady who gave one coin and that meaning more because it was all she had.

 

I actually was not aware of the verses you just shared in Corinthians. It definitely paints it in a different light for me. I find that really encouraging and I think it will make giving with a cheerful spirit much easier instead of doing it with the sense of obligation I was approaching it with before. Thank you for sharing.

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Well I would be very curious to see how many people out there are giving ten percent of their earnings to the church. My guess is not that many, if any at all, and so I just hope that nobody is out there judging others who are not giving to the church. Ever since I was a little kid I have always had a weird feeling about the tithe and the offering plate being passed around, and I am not sure what it is exactly, but it is still there today. I give, of course, and I have no issues with helping the church out in any way, but I cannot help but notice those feelings when I get them. Oh well, this is probably what I like to classify as a "me problem" so I will deal with that. Interesting stuff, though, and thanks for sharing.

 

We endeavor to tithe 10% of our gross income. This goes under the philosophy of what we want God to bless. Do we want him to bless our net or our gross, we choose gross.

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We endeavor to tithe 10% of our gross income. This goes under the philosophy of what we want God to bless. Do we want him to bless our net or our gross, we choose gross.

 

I don't think that tithing should go under the philosophy of what we want God to bless. To me, this means you are tithing in order to get a blessing from God. In my opinion the purpose of tithing is not to be blessed, but rather to support the spreading of the Word. While I would love to be a missionary and devote my life to travelling the world and talking with people about God, that is not practical for me (for several reasons). Instead, I donate (tithe) money to help ensure that others can do what I cannot. Tithing has always been difficult for me in the traditional sense because I do not like handing money over to the church. This is mainly due to personal reasons, like seeing churches I had been attending for years suddenly start to head in a direction that I dis-agreed with. I also feel that tithing is not an obligation, nor does it necessarily have to be monetary based. Someone who donates their time or abilities to a Christian cause is still tithing from my viewpoint. Time or money amounts to the same thing to me. We want God to bless us in everything that we do, I don't think God will bless your net or gross income based on how you choose to tithe, but will bless you based on whether you hand over your time/money with an open heart towards God or in expectation of some form of compensation (blessing) from God.

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I didn't realize that there was a difference between tithing and an offering. I don't tend to give my whole ten percent all at once but when I get paid as I get paid. So, am I offering my way to ten percent? Is that not longer considered tithing if you don't do it all at once?

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I think we need to differentiate between the Old Testament practice of Tithing and that of Almsgiving. The way I see it is that Tithing was (at least originally) only of produce of the land to support the Levites who had no land allocation. Almsgiving was supporting the poor, widows and orphans. Tithing was mandated under the Mosaic law; almsgiving was encouraged.

 

Tithing is not mandated under the New Covenant but we are encouraged, even obligated, to give. The two purposes still apply.

 

We give to support the Church and it's mission (e.g. 1Cor 9:11-14), and we give to help poor - money or goods (Mt 25:34-36 & Jas 2:14-16). We should give freely according to our means (see post #5). My wife and I give 10% of our (net) income to various good causes covering the above (Church and poor), but that's just the way we do it.

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Here is a different interpretation of that story.

 

https://www.gty.org/Blog/B160819

 

Interesting! I've read those verses so many times in the past and I've never seen it in that light.

 

Nevertheless, I always strive to give the 10% off my gross income until it really hurts (and sometimes it does because I'm running a business and the expenses can overrun the gross income at some point). Giving to my local church makes me feel that I'm trusting God with my finances and God has been really faithful in his promises and has taken care of my business and my family. God doesn't need my money, obviously, but how can the church survive if the members don't support it financially? Should I feel guilty if I'm unable to give the 10% off the gross on some occasions? I don't think that my God is a narrow-minded God.

 

 

 

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That's an interesting point actually. Is the tithe 10% of your earnings or 10% of your increase? It matters because tf a businessman with no other income makes no profit, is he exempt from the tithe? If a farmer is struck by murrain and has one head of livestock left (one cow, one chicken, etc.), should he tithe it? Does tithing have to be monetary, or can work-equivalent count (e.g. a builder who was short of cash who repaired the church building donated his skill and supplied the materials as his tithe)?

 

Also, for those who are not members of a church, how do you tithe? Do you donate to a local church who's views you may not agree with, give it to a Christian charity (my solution) or retain it until you can find a church or group to donate it to?

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The OT Law said 10% of your increase. If I owned 1000 sheep and 100 new lambs were born in the spring, I would owe God 10% of 100 lambs (10 lambs). The Tithe on the 1000 sheep would already have been paid. As a modern businessman, your tithe would be on your profit, not your revenue. Your profit is your increase. (In My Opinion)

 

However, I do not believe that the Tithe is required. If you are going to follow the Law, then your Tithe needs to go to the temple in Jerusalem and needs to be used to support the Levites and the widows and orphans. Is the church prepared to take over all government social functions in exchange for a tithe? Has God commanded that?

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If you are going to follow the Law, then your Tithe needs to go to the temple in Jerusalem and needs to be used to support the Levites and the widows and orphans.

Tithing was practiced before the Law was given. After Abraham rescued Lot and the inhabitants of Sodom he gave a tenth to Melchizedek. When Jacob left to go to Laban's home he promised God that if he was allowed to return safely he would give a tenth of what he then possessed.

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Tithing was practiced before the Law was given. After Abraham rescued Lot and the inhabitants of Sodom he gave a tenth to Melchizedek.

Only sort of. A tithe (10%) was given on certain special occasions for specific reasons. In the case of Abraham, Melchizedek was the King of Salem (Jerusalem) ... so it still went to Jerusalem. There is also a difference between a one-time gift to honor a man of God, and a regular payment of a tenth of your increase. When I met the High Priest in the Order of Melchizedek (Hebrews 6:20), I hesitantly gave him everything ... 100% (and not just possessions, I gave my heart, soul and life). Terrifying and exhilarating.

 

When Jacob left to go to Laban's home he promised God that if he was allowed to return safely he would give a tenth of what he then possessed.

Are tithes conditional? This is an offering.

Frankly, it sounds like an attempt to bribe God. When I read about how messed up his family was in the chapters leading up to Joseph, I am not inclined to emulate Jacob. God must have REALLY loved Jacob ... just because.

 

 

I see the NT yardstick more along the lines of:

 

Acts 8:20 [NIV] Peter answered: “May your money perish with you, because you thought you could buy the gift of God with money!

 

1 Corinthians 9:7 [NIV] Each of you should give what you have decided in your heart to give, not reluctantly or under compulsion, for God loves a cheerful giver.

1 Corinthians 16:2 [NIV] On the first day of every week, each one of you should set aside a sum of money in keeping with your income, saving it up, so that when I come no collections will have to be made.

 

Philipians 4:18 [NIV] I have received full payment and have more than enough. I am amply supplied, now that I have received from Epaphroditus the gifts you sent. They are a fragrant offering, an acceptable sacrifice, pleasing to God.

 

It is more about HOW and WHY we give, than HOW MUCH.

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I'm guilty of not tithing properly but I do submit offerings and pass out care bags to the needy. I think part of what makes believers hesitant to give is the doubt behind what's being done with the money, even though we know that is none of our business as long as we are giving in duty. I also support multiple charities and am going to start volunteering this year.

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even though we know that is none of our business

I hear that a lot at my church as well. "God will hold me accountable for what I give, and God will hold them accountable for what they do with it, but it is not our place to question what is done with the money after we have given it" ... seems a popular line of thought. However I seriously question if it is really Biblical.

 

I like the way the NLT tells the story:

 

Matthew 25:14-21 “Again, the Kingdom of Heaven can be illustrated by the story of a man going on a long trip. He called together his servants and entrusted his money to them while he was gone. He gave five bags of silver to one, two bags of silver to another, and one bag of silver to the last—dividing it in proportion to their abilities. He then left on his trip. “The servant who received the five bags of silver began to invest the money and earned five more. The servant with two bags of silver also went to work and earned two more. But the servant who received the one bag of silver dug a hole in the ground and hid the master’s money. “After a long time their master returned from his trip and called them to give an account of how they had used his money. The servant to whom he had entrusted the five bags of silver came forward with five more and said, ‘Master, you gave me five bags of silver to invest, and I have earned five more.’ “The master was full of praise. ‘Well done, my good and faithful servant. You have been faithful in handling this small amount, so now I will give you many more responsibilities. Let’s celebrate together!’

 

It sounds to me like God cares how we use what he has placed in our care - time, talent, treasure. God will call us to give an account of how we have used what he gave us. God will praise or condemn US for our stewardship.

I have trouble reading Matthew 25 and thinking 'that is none of our business'. If I am going to be called to answer to God for that money, I want to be able to give Him a better answer than 'I buried my head in the sand and just blindly trusted men to do the right thing'.

 

God Bless.

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I hear that a lot at my church as well. "God will hold me accountable for what I give, and God will hold them accountable for what they do with it, but it is not our place to question what is done with the money after we have given it" ... seems a popular line of thought. However I seriously question if it is really Biblical.

 

I like the way the NLT tells the story:

 

Matthew 25:14-21 “Again, the Kingdom of Heaven can be illustrated by the story of a man going on a long trip. He called together his servants and entrusted his money to them while he was gone. He gave five bags of silver to one, two bags of silver to another, and one bag of silver to the last—dividing it in proportion to their abilities. He then left on his trip. “The servant who received the five bags of silver began to invest the money and earned five more. The servant with two bags of silver also went to work and earned two more. But the servant who received the one bag of silver dug a hole in the ground and hid the master’s money. “After a long time their master returned from his trip and called them to give an account of how they had used his money. The servant to whom he had entrusted the five bags of silver came forward with five more and said, ‘Master, you gave me five bags of silver to invest, and I have earned five more.’ “The master was full of praise. ‘Well done, my good and faithful servant. You have been faithful in handling this small amount, so now I will give you many more responsibilities. Let’s celebrate together!’

 

It sounds to me like God cares how we use what he has placed in our care - time, talent, treasure. God will call us to give an account of how we have used what he gave us. God will praise or condemn US for our stewardship.

I have trouble reading Matthew 25 and thinking 'that is none of our business'. If I am going to be called to answer to God for that money, I want to be able to give Him a better answer than 'I buried my head in the sand and just blindly trusted men to do the right thing'.

 

God Bless.

 

 

I agree, stewardship is important. In fact, 16 of the 38 parables found in the Gospel, revolve around responsibly using what we are gifted.

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I am not discounting tithe but I am wondering as to what means is it going modern times. In many cases, In many instances, don't know if it's going towards the intended purposes as it was supposed to be at the beginning. I believe that an account should be given for the use of the collections. Many churches have very good outreach programs but there are some that we don't know if they are lending that caring and helping hand to the needy. There are even some church organizations in which leaders are soliciting money to buy expensive homes and jets and there is where the tithes should definitely be directed towards.

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Some churches and preachers who ask for money intend to use it for themselves rather than for God. We need to check the intended recipients of our tithes to make sure they will use them for the intended purpose.

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Some churches and preachers who ask for money intend to use it for themselves rather than for God. We need to check the intended recipients of our tithes to make sure they will use them for the intended purpose.

That's true of any charity e.g. the Motability charity has just hit the headlines for holding £200M funds as "reserves" instead of using them for the people they were intended to help, while their director takes home £1.7M a year salary. Organisations like Charitywatch can help identify this kind of thing when you choose where your funds should go.

 

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You try to sound like you know but you don't. The tithe wasn't money. Study God tells them in the old testament that if the place He wants them to take their tithe is to far to transport it, then sell it, take the cash, go there, have a good time but include the levitical priest. When will people wake up and stop being fooled. Are they Levitical priest? No. And It wasn't about money.

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    • FBI Moved ‘Quickly’ To Spy On Carter Page For ‘Operational Reasons,’ FBI Lawyer Testified

      By Chuck Ross - A leaked transcript of congressional testimony given by FBI attorney Lisa Page in July 2018 sheds new light on how the bureau went about obtaining spy warrants against Carter Page. Lisa Page testified that the FBI was frustrated with the Justice Department over delays in approving the first warrant against the former Trump campaign aide. Page told lawmakers that the FBI had “operational reasons” for quickly obtaining the warrant. FBI officials were frustrated with the Justice Department in the run-up to the 2016 election over the slow pace in granting a secret surveillance warrant against former Trump campaign aide Carter Page, a former FBI lawyer told Congress in 2018. Lisa Page, who served as general counsel to former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe, told lawmakers in a closed-door setting in July 2018 that the FBI wanted to “quickly” obtain a Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) warrant against Carter Page for “operational reasons.” “There was an operational reason that we were pushing to get the FISA up, which I am not at liberty to discuss,” she told lawmakers, according to The Epoch Times, which obtained a leaked transcript of Lisa Page’s testimony. “We had an operational reason that we wanted to get this thing up quickly with respect to the subject himself,” she said. But the FBI was stymied to some degree by the Justice Department, Lisa Page told Congress. The testimony raises further questions about the FBI’s surveillance efforts against Carter Page. Republicans have accused the FBI and Justice Department of misleading the federal judges who oversee the FISA process by relying heavily on the infamous but unverified Steele dossier to make the probable cause case that Carter Page was a foreign agent of Russia. The dossier, which was funded by former presidential candidate Hillary Clinton’s campaign and the Democratic National Committee, is cited heavily in the four FISA warrants granted against Carter Page. But Lisa Page’s testimony further underscores that the FBI had not verified allegations from the dossier before including it in the FISA applications. As The Daily Caller News Foundation has previously reported, Lisa Page, who has no relation to the former Trump aide, told lawmakers that the FBI had not seen evidence of collusion between President Donald Trump’s campaign and the Russian government by the time Robert Mueller was appointed special counsel. Mueller took over the Russia probe in 2017 nearly 10 months after it started. The first spy warrant against Carter Page was granted on Oct. 21, 2016. According to Lisa Page, she first became aware of an effort to obtain a FISA warrant about a month earlier, The Epoch Times reported Friday. That would have been around the time that the dossier first fell into the hands of the FBI unit investigating possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russian government. Lisa Page, who resigned from the FBI on May 4, 2018, testified that dossier author Christopher Steele first provided a copy of the dossier to the FBI in mid-September 2016. That left little time for the FBI to verify Steele’s various claims, including that Carter Page was a back channel between the Trump campaign and Kremlin. Carter Page, who joined the Trump campaign in March 2016, has vehemently denied allegations against him in the Steele dossier. Lisa Page also testified that Stu Evans, who served at the time as deputy attorney general for the national security division, oversaw the FISA process for the Justice Department. She also revealed that she had worked for several years for Bruce Ohr, the Justice Department official who served as an unofficial back channel after the 2016 election between Steele and the FBI. The bureau severed ties with Steele on Nov. 1, 2016 after finding out that the former spy had discussed his Trump investigation with the media. Ohr’s wife, Nellie Ohr, worked at the time for Fusion GPS, the opposition research firm that hired Steele on behalf of Democrats. Lisa Page told Congress that she met Nellie Ohr once at a party thrown by Bruce Ohr. Content created by The Daily Caller News Foundation is available without charge to any eligible news publisher that can provide a large audience. For licensing opportunities of our original content, please contact [email protected] FBI Moved ‘Quickly’ To Spy On Carter Page For ‘Operational Reasons,’ FBI Lawyer Testified is original content from Conservative Daily News - Where Americans go for news, current events and commentary they can trust - Conservative News Website for U.S. News, Political Cartoons and more. View the original full article

      in Political Conservative News

    • John Calvin on Prayer: 6 Reasons Why You Should Pray

      Is it even necessary to pray? This question is sometimes asked today. Apparently, it was also popular over 500 years ago.   In his famous book Institutes of the Christian Religion, John Calvin dedicates extensive time on prayer, and gives plenty of reasons why you and I should pray.   “But someone will say,” Calvin writes, “does God not know even without being reminded, both in what respect we are troubled, and what is expedient for us, so that it seems in a sense that it may be superflous that he should be stirred up by our prayers . . . But they who thus reason do not observe to what end the Lord instructed his people to pray, for he ordained it not so much for his sake but for ours.”   Michael Horton recalls a somewhat common conversation:   “Sometimes people ask me, ‘Why pray if God is sovereign?’ I respond, ‘Why pray if he isn’t?'”   So while there’s more than just six, here’s six reasons why every Christian should pray, as Calvin outlines in his Institutes:   Reason #1: For increased zeal. Calvin starts with zeal. For without communion with the Lord, you can’t expect to be zealous for the Lord. For without communion with the Lord, you can't expect to be zealous for the Lord. - David Qaoud   “First, that our hearts may be fired with a zealous and burning desire ever to seek, love, and serve him, while we become accustomed in every need to flee to him as to a sacred anchor.”   Reason #2: For the right desires. Then, Calvin goes to desires. But not just to any desires, but holy ones.   “Secondly, that there may enter our hearts no desire and no wish at all of which we should be ashamed to make him a witness, while we learn to set all our wishes before his eyes, and even to pour out our whole hearts.”   Reason #3: For increased gratitude. Now, we’re on to gratitude. The world wants to increase our discontentment, but through prayer, we can be a grateful people.   “Thirdly, that we be prepared to receive his benefits with true gratitude of heart and thanksgiving, benefits that our prayer reminds us come from his hand.”   Reason #4: For reflection on God’s answers. We should pray for blessings. But after receiving them, if God wills them, we should spend time reflecting on God’s goodness through prayer.   “Fourthly, moreover, that, having obtained what we were seeking, and being convinced that he has answered our prayers, we should be led to meditate upon his kindness more ardently.”   Reason #5: For greater delight in God. Delight and duty go together. Our duty is prayer, and our delight is God. But only through prayer can we actually delight in him (and the blessings he gives).   “And fifthly, that at the same time we embrace with greater delight those things which we acknowledge to have been obtained by prayers.”   Reason #6: For confirmation of God’s Providence. I love Calvin because he always seems to bring things back to God’s Providence. Nevertheless, he does the same with prayer, and we should end prayer to help us confirm God’s Providence.   “Finally, that use and experience may, according to the measure of our feebleness, confirm his Providence, while we understand not only that he promises never to fail us, and of his own will opens the way to call upon him at the very point of necessity, but also that he ever extends his hand to help his own, no wet-nurising them with words but defending them with present help.”   Calvin adds, “On account of these things, our most merciful Father, although he never sleeps or idles, still very often gives the impression of one sleeping or idling in order that he may thus train us, other wise idle and lazy, to seek, ask, and entreat him to our great good.”   Prayer is not just a suggestion; it’s a command. And, amazingly, God will listen to your prayer and grant your request if it aligns with his will. Your prayers make things happen. As John Piper once said, “Prayer causes things to happen that wouldn’t happen if you didn’t pray.”   Source: http://gospelrelevance.com/2016/07/1...-reasons-pray/

      in Calvinism

    • Figuring out the Reasons Paul Wrote Romans (And Why It Matters)

      It is hard to account for all the data of Paul’s letter to the Romans, without concluding, along with Wedderburn, that “no one, single reason or cause will adequately explain the writing of Romans.” It is, nevertheless, helpful to distinguish between the single occasion that precipitated the letter, and the several purposes which Paul was seeking to accomplish by the letter, in view of that particular occasion. The former is Paul’s imminent arrival in Rome, en route to the virgin mission field that lay in the western reaches of the Empire, namely Spain (15:22–29). But it is because this impending visit had such far-reaching implications for both Paul and the churches of Rome, that a number of interlocking purposes lie behind the writing of the letter. My aim in this article is three-fold. First, I want to give to students and pastors a clear and accessible entry point to what has become a highly complex and protracted discussion. Although what follows is my own understanding of the question and is not intended as a survey of the many positions taken, the reader can follow the references to pursue various avenues for further exploration. Second, I seek to give an account of the relationship between the reasons for Romans, with “reasons” understood as a combination of the letter occasion and the letter’s purposes, as just defined. I will suggest that there are three main purposes that lie behind the writing of Romans, and that these purposes are conceptually related both to one-another and to the letter occasion. The attractiveness of a single-reason hypothesis for Romans is that it offers conceptual clarity, presupposing a unity amidst the diversity of the letter’s contents. The problem with the various single-reason hypotheses is that they fail to account for all the data of Romans. The attractiveness of a multi-reason hypothesis for Romans is that it better accounts for the sheer complexity and scope of the letter. But the problem is that it then becomes hard to see how the various reasons relate to one another or form a conceptual whole. Therefore, I will attempt to show some of the connections between the reasons for Romans. Third, in probing the relationships between the reasons for Romans, I aim to encourage students and preachers of this great letter to treat it as a unity, and to see the wood for all the theological trees that lie within. READ MORE View the full article

      in Christian Current Events

    • Dave Ramsey Tells Pastors to Stop Asking 'Broke' People to Tithe

      Dave Ramsey says pastors should not ask “broke people” to tithe until they first work on their debt and budgeting. View the full article

      in Christian Current Events

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