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William

New ISIS 'kill list' includes 1,700 Americans, churches, and synagogue members

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The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria's (ISIS) latest "kill list" targets around 1,700 individuals including American citizens, churches, and synagogue members.

On July 3, ISIS released a new kill list, prompting the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to alert American Jewish leaders on the possible threat to synagogues. On Friday, around 200 Jewish leaders participated in a conference call organized by the Secure Community Network (SCN), Haaretz reports.

 

New ISIS 'kill list' includes 1,700 Americans, churches, and synagogue members

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Quite disturbing, I do believe that this is just fear mongering though and those on the list do not need to be frightened or worried. It is important to remember the aims of groups like ISIS and not give in to their desires.

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Quite disturbing, I do believe that this is just fear mongering though and those on the list do not need to be frightened or worried. It is important to remember the aims of groups like ISIS and not give in to their desires.

 

Personally, I'd be concerned if your name or family member was included on a list for potential gang bangers. We are talking about ISIS, this isn't something to ignore. We have Obama for that....

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I do believe that this is just fear mongering though and those on the list do not need to be frightened or worried. It is important to remember the aims of groups like ISIS and not give in to their desires.
In the West and places where they can't send a jihadi who has been fighting for them, ISIS expects someone, anyone who is sympthetic to their "cause" to take up arms and kill anyone they know who is on the list. There has been a rise in lone wolf terror attacks lately and as it can be almost impossible to stop these attacks this is more than just fear mongering.
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It's time for the American inner security services to get back to working extremely hard. However, I'm still kind of unsure about them. Hope they will do their best to save us from ISIS. They have to examine everyone who's trying to get into the country. We, in turn, have to be vigilant and report anyone who's behavior seems disturbing.

 

Pray for the safety to come and not leave

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It's time for the American inner security services to get back to working extremely hard. However, I'm still kind of unsure about them. Hope they will do their best to save us from ISIS. They have to examine everyone who's trying to get into the country. We, in turn, have to be vigilant and report anyone who's behavior seems disturbing.

 

Pray for the safety to come and not leave

 

At the same time however I believe people's privacy and liberty should be respected. It is indeed very hard to strike the perfect balance, I do recall the NSA had been very ineffective at any substantial terrorism prevention - Time will tell I guess.

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This is disturbing, but I suppose not surprising considering how evil to the core ISIS is. That and recently there was an Islamist attack on a French church that left a priest dead. I hope the folks on the list take extra precautions and that our government takes steps to ensure their safety. Though considering recent events, I have my doubts on the latter, but that is another topic.

 

Also, I couldn't help but think of John Calvin's reference regarding Islam. In a sermon on Deuteronomy, he stated the religion was one of the "the two horns of antichrist". Those are strong word, but all things considered, it is hard to argue with his reasoning.

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Well here we go again. Another threat from a foreign enemy and heightened alert levels and all of the discussions in the media....it just seems to be set on repeat at this point and really shows no sign of slowing down either. It is such as a sad reality of this life, the fact that people resort to acts of terror towards the innocent, but it is something that we need to look at seriously. I hope that we can one day see the end of this, but right now my hopes are really in sight as far as I can tell.

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