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John Calvin puts forward a very simple reason why love is the greatest gift: “Because faith and hope are our own: love is diffused among others.” In other words, faith and hope benefit the possessor, but love always benefits another. In John 13:34–35 Jesus says, “A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.” Love always requires an “other” as an object; love cannot remain within itself, and that is part of what makes love the greatest gift.
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William

That's so politically incorrect!

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Post em if you got em!

 

 

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This one is great.

 

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Maybe I should have posted this one in "Why are we laughing?"

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No you didn't! You didn't publish Frank the Hippy Pope!

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No you didn't! You didn't publish Frank the Hippy Pope!
Yeah, I did.

 

 

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I know, it’s not a cute picture with a cute phrase, but it’s still hilarious and my comments are Politically Incorrect regarding this news article, How race, class set the stage for Flint water crises.

 

The article opens with a bizarre video of a man filling up empty milk jugs with bottled water (!?) and then going on to discuss how not having running water makes living at home a full-time job (!?). He says if the people of Flint were white, someone would have listened (!?).

 

Only about half if Flint is black, so the news outlet could have easily given us a video of a silly white man, but that wouldn’t have served the narrative that blacks in Flint are victims of racism. “The Flint Water Advisory Task Force, which today released its final report of a four-month review of the crisis, was resolute. Race played a factor…” (Maybe they shouldn’t be using their money for racist witch hunts. Maybe if they had used their money instead for a two-cent pH test strip for the new water source. Morons.)

 

Uh, but Democrats control the city. A Republican couldn’t even get a city job as dog-catcher in Flint. Democrat politicians (decisively elected by black voters) twice bankrupted Flint in recent years. Democrats staffed the local water company with people who should have had at least the low-level of competence needed to assure that the water met safety standards. The city manager who oversaw the change in the city’s water supply is a black Democrat.

 

 

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Darnell Earley, the Flint city manager who is responsible for the change in water sources. "Don't blame me, blame the (Republican) cracker behind the tree."

 

Literally, Democrats can lynch blacks and Republicans get the blame.

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Here’s a short history lesson on Muhammad and his entrance into Islam’s now holy city of Medina as a refugee via Eretz Yisrael:

 

Although the fact is little publicized, more than one historian has affirmed at the Arab world’s second holiest city, Medina, was one of the allegedly “purely Arab” cities that actually was first settled by Jewish tribes. And like the 16th Century English Protestants who financed their endeavors through the plunder of Catholic monasteries in England, the roots of Islamic anti-Semitism might be found in the initial plunder of Jewish settlements, and the imposition of a “poll tax” to fund Arab campaigns.

 

Bernard Lewis writes:

 

The city of Medina, some 280 miles north of Mecca, had originally been settled by Jewish tribes from the north, especially the Banu Nadir and Banu Quraiza. The comparative richness of the town attracted an infiltration of pagan Arabs who came at first as clients of the Jews and ultimately succeeded in dominating them. Medina, or, as it was known before Islam, Yathrib, had no form of stable government at all. The town was tom by the feuds of the rival Arab tribes of Aus and Khazraj, with the Jews maintaining an uneasy balance of power. The latter, engaged mainly in agriculture and handicrafts, were economically and culturally superior to the Arabs, and were consequently disliked…. as soon as the Arabs had attained unity through the agency of Muhammad they attacked and ultimately eliminated the Jews.

 

In the last half of the fifth century, many Persian Jews fled from persecution to Arabia, swelling the Jewish population there. But around the sixth century, Christian writers reported of the continuing importance of the Jewish community that remained in the Holy Land. For the dispersed Arabian Jewish settlers, Tiberias in Judea was central. In the Kingdom of Himyar on the Red Sea’s east coast in Arabia, “conversion to Judaism of influential circles” was popular, and the Kingdom’s rule stretched across “considerable portions of South Arabia.”The commoners as well as the royal family adopted Judaism, and one writer ports that “Jewish priests (presumably rabbis) from Tiberias … formed part the suite of King Du Noas and served as his envoys in negotiations with Christian cities.”

 

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Oh yeah.

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While 98+% of Muslims aren't terrorists; 98+% of all terrorists are Muslims. Not a bigot rant,rather a statement of a sad fact. Tomorrows headline," ISIS invades whole Non-Islamic world posing as refugees.Brilliant strategy, get your enemy to feed & shelter you while you make bombs to kill them. " Think we need a political re-think on this one, kids !!!

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While 98+% of Muslims aren't terrorists; 98+% of all terrorists are Muslims. Not a bigot rant,rather a statement of a sad fact. Tomorrows headline," ISIS invades whole Non-Islamic world posing as refugees.Brilliant strategy, get your enemy to feed & shelter you while you make bombs to kill them. " Think we need a political re-think on this one, kids !!!

 

100% of Muslims are not Christian (maybe there are some Messianic Muslims or Chrislams, but I'll stick with my 100%). And, 100% of Muslims follow a religion created by a warlord who designed the religion to promote violence. But, it's Politically Correct to bash Muslims in Evangelical circles.

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