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Doctrine Divides

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[ATTACH=CONFIG]n146[/ATTACH]

 

Michael Jeshurun

 

With a zeal to cast away everything which the Roman Catholic Church holds, many have suggested that true Christians should have nothing to do with Doctrines and Creeds as well, seeing that the Harlot Church holds to such.

 

In fact some Christians when asked WHAT their doctrine is, count it a mark of humility and maturity to say – “It is just Jesus Christ”!

 

Beloved, it does not help to say that one’s creed is just ‘Jesus Christ’. For there are MANY Christ’s! We have the Romish Christ, the Mormon Christ, the ‘Christ’ of the Jehovah’s Witnesses and every other cult which defends its authority by Scripture claims to believe in ‘Jesus Christ’.

 

So it behooves us to define the Christ we believe in by Sound doctrine! This is why every Church worth its name has what they call their ‘Statement of Faith’!

 

Our LORD was concerned much about DOCTRINE and directly asked those who claimed to believe in God how THEY understood the Scriptures. “He said unto him, What is written in the law? how readest THOU”? [Luke 10:26]. In other words, “How do YOU interpret it”?! He not only taught the right doctrine but fought against false doctrine and was ultimately hounded to death for His doctrine! ‘And they sought how they might destroy him: for they feared him, because all the people were ASTONISHED AT HIS DOCTRINE’. [Mark 11:18]

 

The early disciples not only centered their lives around THE RIGHT DOCTRINE but admonished the church not to entertain those who DIFFERED DOCTRINALLY. ‘And they continued stedfastly in the apostles' doctrine and fellowship, and in breaking of bread, and in prayers’. ‘If there come any unto you, and bring not THIS DOCTRINE, receive him not into your house, neither bid him God speed’ [Act 2:42; 2Jn 1:10]

 

Much more could be said on the importance of creeds and doctrines. But suffice it to say, it is not enough to say that your creed is JUST ‘Jesus Christ’!

 

There are those who complain, “Oh but doctrine DIVIDES”! Oh yes it does! IT DIVIDES BETWEEN THE SHEEP AND THE GOATS, AND THOSE WHO ARE ELECT AND THOSE WHO ARE NOT!

 

Is the Jesus I believe in the third person of the Godhead?! Is He very God of very God and one substance with the Father!? Is He the Absolute Sovereign who hath mercy on whom He will and hardens whom He will!? Is he the frustrated saviour who desires the salvation of all men hoping that they will choose him of their own ‘free will’ or is He the Omnipotent Lord who makes His people willing in the Day of His power!? [Psalm 110:3]

 

The right answer to just the above questions will eliminate and expose the myriads of false Churches that pervade the land!

 

The Apostle warned of ‘false brethren’ which would creep into assemblies [Gal 2:4,5]. How does one recognize them? For these are not outright wolves that can be easily spotted, but Goats who have learned to bleat like sheep.

 

They are strangers to God’s Sovereign Grace! Oh they speak of ‘grace’ all right! But grace according to THEM is the REWARD God gives to all those who have EXERCISED THEIR ‘FREE-WILL’ TO ‘ACCEPT HIM’! If they COULD they would go back and change John 6:44 to read “No man can come to Me, except they exercise their own free-will and choose Me”! And while they are at it they would also rewrite Romans 9:16 to read “IT IS of him that willeth, and of him that runneth, NOT OF GOD that showeth mercy”!

 

According to THEIR theology (theology if you could call it) goats can become sheep anywhere, anytime they choose, by exercising their ‘free-will’ and a sheep can change back into a goat any day anytime by that same ‘free-will’! The sheep according to them are not KEPT BY THE POWER OF GOD, as the Apostle affirms [1Pet 1:5], but by their own whimsical free will, determination and resolution!

 

They have a great disdain and abhorrence for the milk of the Word, not to mention strong meat. They are afraid of the very word ‘DOCTRINE’. To them anything rich in the Word and doctrine is a ‘lecture’ at best or a ‘Churchy sounding statement’ at worst. They have been raised on short little stories and sermonettes all their lives, so anything which makes them think or search the Scriptures is too much for their unregenerated carnal minds!

 

So whether you are a newly born again child of God looking for a Church to join, or an Elder (Pastor) considering admitting someone into the Church or opening the pulpit to them – don’t just give them your right hand of fellowship just because they say they believe in Jesus. Ask them to DEFINE the Jesus they believe in. If they say they are new to the faith and would love to learn the right doctrine then teach them with love and patience, but if they are already established in damnable heresies, then after the first and second admonition REJECT THEM! [Titus 3:10,11]

 

This is Scriptural!

 

Even when deciding to marry someone you might be in love with, it is of great importance to find out where your ‘spouse to be’ stands theologically. Don’t ever be deceived into thinking that you can win them over to the truth AFTER marriage! It rarely ever happens!

 

For two CANNOT walk together except they be agreed! And a believer hath no part with an unbeliever or an infidel! [2Cor 6:15]

 

The Bible in itself is NOT a work on Systematic Theology, but only the QUARRY out of which the stone for such a temple can be obtained. If you preached the ‘WHOLE COUNSEL OF GOD’ AS IT IS IN JESUS CHRIST, you will find to your dismay that MANY who say they ‘love Jesus’ or believe in the Bible will be AGAINST YOU! I speak this from sad experience!

 

This is the dangerous error of the Ecumenical movement! Those who adhere to the mindset of THIS movement say – “Doctrine does not matter. All that matters is that ‘you love Jesus’ and just believe the ‘Bible’!

 

A lie from the pit of Hell!

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