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Arminian Temptress Convinces Calvinist To Shave His Beard

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TULSA, OK—A "foul Arminian temptress" dating local Calvinist man Bernard Michaels convinced the Reformed believer to shave his beard, causing him to lose all his powers of theology, exegesis, and arguing on the internet.

The post Arminian Temptress Convinces Calvinist To Shave His Beard appeared first on The Babylon Bee.

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Run Samson Run

Neil Sedaka

In the bible, 1000 year bc
There's a story of ancient history
Bout a fella who was strong as he could be
Till he met a cheatin gal who brought him tragedy
Oh, run Samson run, Delilah's on her way
Run Samson run, you ain't got time to stay
Run Samson run, on your mark you better start
I'd rather trust a hungry lion than a gal with a cheatin heart
She was a demon, a devil in disguise
He was taken by the angel in her eyes
That lady barber was very well equipped
You can bet your bottom dollar that he was gonna get clipped
Oh, run Samson run, Delilah's on her way
Run Samson run, you ain't got time to stay
Run Samson run, on your mark you better start
I'd rather trust a hungry lion than a gal with a cheatin heart
Oh Delilah made Sammy's life a sin
And he perished when the roof fell in
There's a moral so listen to me pal
There's a little of Delilah in each and every gal
Oh, run Samson run, Delilah's on her way
Run Samson run, you ain't got time to stay
Run Samson run, on your mark you better start
I'd rather trust a hungry lion than a gal with a cheatin heart
I'd rather trust a hungry lion than a gal with a cheatin heart

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2 hours ago, Becky said:

There's a little of Delilah in each and every gal
I'd rather trust a hungry lion than a gal with a cheatin heart
I'd rather trust a hungry lion than a gal with a cheatin heart

Now a days it is very difficult to find a girl without cheating heart.

it has became norm in society.

 

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I've never heard this one and the arrangement in my head is likely no the original.  People that YHWH blesses with my talent, some times lose their aqbility to play their instruments but we never loose our ability to compose in our heads.

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13 hours ago, Bill Taylor said:

I've never heard this one and the arrangement in my head is likely no the original.  People that YHWH blesses with my talent, some times lose their aqbility to play their instruments but we never loose our ability to compose in our heads.

 

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