Jump to content

The Protestant Community

Christian and Theologically Protestant? Or, sincerely inquiring about the Protestant faith? Welcome to Christforums the Christian Protestant community. You'll first need to register in order to join our community. Create or respond to threads on your favorite topics and subjects. Registration takes less than a minute, it's simple, fast, and free! Enjoy the fellowship! God bless, Christforums' Staff
Register now

Fenced Community

Christforums is a Protestant Christian forum, open to Bible-believing Christians such as Presbyterians, Lutherans, Reformed, Baptists, Church of Christ members, Pentecostals, Anglicans. Methodists, Charismatics, or any other conservative, Nicene- derived Christian Church. We do not solicit cultists of any kind, including Mormons, Jehovah's Witnesses, Eastern Lightning, Falun Gong, Unification Church, Aum Shinrikyo, Christian Scientists or any other non-Nicene, non-Biblical heresy.
Register now

Christian Fellowship

John Calvin puts forward a very simple reason why love is the greatest gift: “Because faith and hope are our own: love is diffused among others.” In other words, faith and hope benefit the possessor, but love always benefits another. In John 13:34–35 Jesus says, “A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.” Love always requires an “other” as an object; love cannot remain within itself, and that is part of what makes love the greatest gift.
davidtaylorjr

Praying For A Miracle

Recommended Posts

Our community has been tortured with the unknown since New Year's Eve.  

WWW.NEWSCHANNEL5.COM

The search for a missing 19-year-old continues Wednesday after her vehicle was swept away by floodwaters in Monroe County, Kentucky.

 

 

This young lady is a member of our sister church and was a student of my mother-in-law in high school.  Pray for the search crews as they continue to look for her. 

  • Praying 3

Share this post


Link to post

Still no updates as the search continues into day 4. The community is holding a prayer vigil tonight.

Share this post


Link to post

Leah's body was found this morning five miles away from the bridge her car was swept off of. Please pray for her family and our whole community during this time.  Please also pray for me as I preach tomorrow morning that I will have the strength and the right words to say during this difficult time.

  • Praying 1

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Topics

    • Mario Lopez Receives 'Miracle,' Announces Wife's Pregnancy after Thinking it Wasn't in 'God's Plan'

      Actor and Television Host Mario Lopez and his wife Courtney announced on Friday that they are having a third child. View the full article

      in Christian Current Events

    • Calling on the name of the Lord: Praying to Jesus

      Call on the name of the Lord When one "called on the name of the Lord" in the Old Testament it referred to praying to YHWH[*1] as "the everlasting God" (Genesis 21:33).   There are several passages in the New Testament that demonstrate when one calls upon the name of the Lord it is done in reference to praying to the Lord Jesus as YHWH (the everlasting God).    [*1] Genesis 4:26 Then men began to call upon the name of the Lord. (NASB) NIDNOTTE: The very first prayer is mentioned in Gen 4:26: "At that time men began to call on the name of the LORD." Before that time "men" (Adam, Eve, Cain) conversed directly with the Lord (3:8-19; 4:6-7, 9, 10-15). Now, bridging the developing gap, people began to communicate with God through prayer (4:1062, Prayer, P. A. Verhoef). For other examples that demonstrate calling on the name of the Lord (or similar expressions) refers to praying to the Lord see Psalm 86:6-12; 99:5-6; 116:4; Jeremiah 29:12; Lamentations 3:55-57; Zephaniah 3:9.   Acts 2:21 (cf. Joel 2:32)
      And it shall come to pass that everyone who calls upon the name of the Lord shall be saved. (ESV)
       These words taken from Joel 2:32 in application to YHWH are also applied by Peter to the Lord Jesus.[*1] This demonstrates that Jesus equally shares the appellation of YHWH with the Father.[*2] 
           1. Stephen Motyer: The New Testament use of this expression is remarkable for the way in which it is applied to Jesus. Joel 2:32 is quoted in both Acts 2:21 and Romans 10:13, but in both places "the Lord" is then identified as Jesus (Acts 2:36; Romans 10:14). The dramatic conviction of the first (Jewish) Christians was that Israel's worship needed to be redirected: people could no longer be saved by calling on Yahweh/Jehovah, the Old Testament name of God, but only on that of Jesus: "there is no other name under heaven given to men by which we must be saved" (Acts 4:12). To "call on the name of our Lord Jesus Christ" (1 Corinthians 1:2) therefore means worshiping him with divine honors (Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology, Call, Calling).
      http://www.studylight.org/dictionaries/bed/c/call-calling.html
         2. George Ladd: This outpouring of the Holy Spirit will bring about a great day of salvation, and whoever calls on the name of the Lord shall be saved. Lord in Joel refers to God, but Peter and the early church applied this to the exalted Jesus (The Wycliffe Bible Commentary, page 1128).   [*1] Notice as well that Peter's sermon concludes with him once again applying "Lord" in reference to Jesus (Acts 2:36).  F. F. Bruce: But the practical application here, as in Rom. 10:13 (where the same text is quoted), is to Jesus (The Acts of the Apostles, co. 1990, page 122).   [*2] The divine work of pouring out the Holy Spirit is shared by the Father (Acts 2:17; cf. Joel 2:28) and the Lord Jesus (Acts 2:33).   Acts 7:59-60 (59) And as they were stoning Stephen, he called out, "Lord Jesus, receive my spirit."
      (60) And falling to his knees he cried out with a loud voice, "Lord, do not hold this sin against them." And when he had said this, he fell asleep. (ESV)
           1. Frederick Danker: Just as Israel was to understand her role as one of obedience to the God who saved her, so the Christian is to see the moral and ethical implications of this recognition of Christ's claim to ownership expressed so often in such a phrase as "Paul, a slave of Christ Jesus." Out of such conviction the iron of steadfast confession was smelted. As the stones came flying at Stephen, he prayed, "Lord Jesus, receive my spirit." (Acts 7:59) (Creeds in the Bible, page 45, c. 1966).
           2. David Peterson: But he pointedly 'calls upon' the Lord Jesus in prayer instead of the Father, trusting him for salvation through death and beyond. Thus, he articulates his belief in the divinity of Christ. Then 'he fell on his knees and cried out, "Lord, do not hold this sin against them." Jesus prayed to the Father that those crucified him might be forgiven (Lk. 23:34), and Stephen prays for the forgiveness of those stoning him, once again addressing Jesus as Lord (The Acts of the Apostles, Pillar New Testament Commentary, page 269).
           3. William Mounce: Jesus is the addressee when epikaleō is used in the sense of praying (Acts 7:59) (Mounce's Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words, Call, page 93).
           4. J. Jeremias: Stephen prays: kurie Iesou dezai to pneuma mou (Ac.7:59) (TDNT 5:771, paradeisos).
           5. W. E. Vine: Prayer is properly addressed to God the Father, Matt. 6:6; John 16:23; Eph. 1:17; 3:14, and the Son, Acts 7:59; 2 Cor. 12:8 (Vine's Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words, Prayer, page 872).
           6. Marvin Vincent: An unquestionable prayer to Christ.
      http://www.godrules.net/library/vincent/vincentact7.htm There are several important points concerning Stephen's prayer to the Lord Jesus in Acts 7:59-60:
           1. The worship of the Father and the worship of the Lord Jesus is demonstrated by Luke in Christ's prayer to the Father (Luke 23:34, 46) and in Stephen's prayer to Christ (Acts 7:59-60). Some try to evade the fact that the Lord Jesus is being prayed to by pointing out that Stephen was experiencing a vision of the Lord Jesus so it really doesn't constitute a prayer. However, the vision took place in the city while the prayer took place after he was "cast out of the city" (Acts 7:58). Others have claimed that since Paul appealed (epikaloumai) to Caesar (Acts 25:11) it doesn't mean that when Stephen called (epikaloumenon) to the Lord Jesus prayer is involved. To this it is answered that in Acts 7:59 the Lord Jesus heard what Stephen said at that very moment. The same can not be said concerning Caesar's ability to hear what Paul spoke at that precise moment. One must consider how the Greek word is used in context. Indeed, concerning the Greek word deomai (Strong's #1189) we see that in Luke 9:40 a man "begged" (deomai) Christ's disciples. This doesn't mean he prayed to them even though deomai is used in Luke 10:2 concerning praying (deomai) to the Lord of the harvest. Notice as well that Paul's verbal appeal to Caesar pales in significance to what Stephen expressed. Stephen called out to the Lord Jesus to receive his spirit. This carries with it the idea that the Lord Jesus is God the Creator (see Ecclesiastes 12:7 below). In addition to this is the fact that the Lord Jesus, being the Heart-knower of all, fully knew what Stephen was going to say even before he spoke. This is a powerful proof of His Deity. Stephen prayed to the Lord Jesus, but Paul did not pray to Caesar. Still others maintain that Stephen prayed to the Lord Jesus in Acts 7:59 but that he prayed to the Father in Acts 7:60. This assertion is really absurd. While the rocks mercilessly pummeled Stephen there is no need for him to say the "Lord Jesus" when he already clearly did so in Acts 7:59.   Acts 9:14
      And here he has authority from the chief priests to bind all who call on your name. (ESV)     
           1. Allen P. Ross: In the NT the word is used is many of the same ways as in the OT, but most notable is the way that the name of Jesus is substituted for the name of God. Now one can call on (i.e., worship) the name of Jesus (Acts 9:14) (NIDOTTE 4:151, name - shem).     
           2. Barclay Newman and Eugene Nida: The phrase call on your name is equivalent to "worship you" (A Translator's Handbook on The Acts of the Apostles, Acts 9:14, page 191).[*1]           3. Daniel Whedon: A clear declaration that the very peculiarity of the Christian was praying to Jesus.
      http://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/acts-9.html#1      4. J. C. O'Neill: To call on the name of the Lord Jesus was to worship the God of Israel (The Use of KYRIOS in the Book of Acts, Scottish Journal of Theology, Volume 8, Issue 2, c. June, 1955, page 172).   [*1] Calling upon the name of the Lord (Acts 9:14) also means to believe in the Lord (Acts 22:19).  Acts 9:14 And here he has authority from the chief priests to bind all who call on your name. (ESV)      Acts 22:19 And I said, Lord, they themselves know that in one synagogue after another I imprisoned and beat those who believed in you. (ESV)  If anyone claims to believe in Jesus but refuses to worship Jesus then they do not believe in the biblical Jesus (cf. 2 Corinthians 11:4). Indeed, just as believing in God with all of one's household implies the worship of God (Acts 16:34), so too does believing in the Lord Jesus with all of one's household imply the worship of the Lord Jesus (Acts 18:8).
      Acts 9:21
      All those hearing him continued to be amazed, and were saying, "Is this not he who in Jerusalem destroyed those who called on this name, and who had come here for the purpose of bringing them bound before the chief priests?" (NASB - the underlined is mine) Galatians 1:23 but only, they kept hearing, "He who once persecuted us is now preaching the faith which he once tried to destroy." (NASB - the underlined is mine) Jude 1:3 Beloved, while I was making every effort to write you about our common salvation, I felt the necessity to write to you appealing that you contend earnestly for the faith which was once for all handed down to the saints. (NASB - the underlined is mine)      1. Praying to the Lord Jesus as YHWH (Acts 9:21)[*1] is equated with "the faith" (Galatians 1:23)[*2] that Christians must "contend earnestly for" (Jude 1:3). Those who refuse to pray to the Lord Jesus as YHWH do not belong to the Christian faith for their faith/gospel is accursed (Galatians 1:8-9).[*3]      [*1] Those who have been sanctified by faith in Christ Jesus are the same ones who have called upon His name as YHWH in prayer. Acts 26:18 to open their eyes so that they may turn from darkness to light and from the dominion of Satan to God, that they may receive forgiveness of sins and an inheritance among those who have been sanctified by faith in Me. (NASB - the underlined is mine) 1 Corinthians 1:2 To the church of God which is at Corinth, to those who have been sanctified in Christ Jesus, saints by calling, with all who in every place call on the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, their Lord and ours. (NASB - the underlined is mine)   [*2] The same Greek word (portheo) is employed for "destroyed" in Acts 9:21 and "destroy" in Galatians 1:23.   [*3] Concerning "the faith" in Galatians 1:23 the BDAG (3rd Edition) reads: If the principal component of Christianity is faith, then p. can be understood as the Gospel in terms of the commitment it evokes (pistis, page 820).   Acts 22:16-21 (The Lord of the temple) (16) Now why do you delay? Get up and be baptized, and wash away your sins, calling on His name.’
      (17) “It happened when I returned to Jerusalem and was praying in the temple, that I fell into a trance,
      (18) and I saw Him saying to me, ‘Make haste, and get out of Jerusalem quickly, because they will not accept your testimony about Me.’
      (19) And I said, ‘Lord, they themselves understand that in one synagogue after another I used to imprison and beat those who believed in You.
      (20) And when the blood of Your witness Stephen was being shed, I also was standing by approving, and watching out for the coats of those who were slaying him.’
      (21) And He said to me, ‘Go! For I will send you far away to the Gentiles.’” (NASB) Although occurring at different times both of Paul's prayers to the Lord Jesus are brought together by Luke in Acts 22:16-17. Paul calls upon the name of the Lord Jesus in prayer (Acts 22:16) and immediately afterwards he is praying in the temple (Acts 22:17).[*1] That the Lord Jesus responds (Acts 22:18) implies Paul was praying to Him on both occasions (Acts 22:16-17).   [*1] David Peterson: Moreover, Paul's vision implies that the risen Jesus is Lord of the temple, who reveals his will and commissions his servant in that context for his mission to the nations. The parallel with Isaiah's call in Isaiah 6 becomes all the more stunning when it is realised that the risen Lord Jesus takes the roll of 'the Lord God Almighty' in directing Paul and warning him about the opposition he will receive (cf. the recollection of Is. 6:9-10 in Acts 28:24-28) (The Acts of the Apostles, Pillar New Testament Commentary, page 604-605).  There are further similarities when we compare the missions given by the Lord to both Isaiah and to Paul while he was in the temple (the underlined below is mine). Isaiah 42:6-7 (6) I am the LORD, I have called You in righteousness,
      I will also hold You by the hand and watch over You,
      And I will appoint You as a covenant to the people,
      As a light to the nations, (7) To open blind eyes,
      To bring out prisoners from the dungeon
      And those who dwell in darkness from the prison. (NASB) Acts 26:17-18 (17) rescuing you from the Jewish people and from the Gentiles, to whom I am sending you,
      (18) to open their eyes so that they may turn from darkness to light and from the dominion of Satan to God, that they may receive forgiveness of sins and an inheritance among those who have been sanctified by faith in Me. (NASB)  Notice as well that the Lord will watch over Isaiah (Isaiah 42:6) and in like manner rescue Paul (Acts 26:17). The nations (Isaiah 42:6) to whom the light will be sent refers to the Gentiles (Acts 26:17). Before their conversion they were prisoners in the dungeon (Isaiah 42:7) which means they were under the dominion of Satan (Acts 26:18). That God called Isaiah to bring them out (Isaiah 42:7) parallels the message Paul would preach of being forgiven/set free from one's sins by faith in Christ (Acts 26:18).  

      in God (Trinitarian doctrines)

    • Understanding Catholicism – Praying to Mary

      Catholics, Orthodox (and some Anglicans) claim it is legitimate to pray to Mary and other Saints in heaven. Other Christians claim we should only pray to God.   Who is right? Well, contradictory as it may seem - both are right, because both are using ‘pray’ in a different way.   In Greek there are two words that we translate as ‘pray’, parakaleo and proseuchomai. Greek speaking Orthodox use parakaleo for addressing Mary & the Saints and proseuchomai for addressing God and. We have only the one word, “pray”, and hence the misunderstandings that arise in this.   Parakaleo (Strong 3870): "to call near, that is, invite, invoke (by imploration, hortation or consolation):—beseech, call for, (be of good) comfort, desire, (give) exhort (-ation), intreat, pray."   This is similar to the etymology of pray given in the Online Etymology Dictionary: c.1290, "ask earnestly, beg," also "pray to a god or saint," from O.Fr. preier (c.900), from L. precari "ask earnestly, beg," from *prex (plural preces, gen. precis) "prayer, request, entreaty," from PIE base *prek- "to ask, request, entreat"   So pray means, at its root, ask earnestly, entreat, beg, request.   If you read old English plays you will find phrases such as “prithee sir” (pray you sir) or “where are you going I pray”.   Take these extracts from that great English writer, Jane Austen “But pray, Colonel, how came you to conjure out that I should be in town today?” (Mrs Jennings to Colonel Brandon in Sense and Sensibility)   "Oh! cousin, stop a moment, pray stop!" (Fanny Price to Edmund in Mansfield Park)   Scripture itself uses the word pray in this manner:   Notwithstanding, that I be not further tedious unto thee, I pray (parakalo) thee that thou wouldest hear us of thy clemency a few words. (Acts 24:4 - KJV)   Wherefore I pray (parakalo) you to take some meat: for this is for your health (Acts 27:34 - KJV)   It is in this sense of asking, requesting, petitioning, entreating, that Catholics ‘pray’ to Mary   Proseuchomai (Strong 4336) "to pray to God, that is, supplicate, worship:—pray (X earnestly, for), make prayer."   It is this word proseuchomai that is generally used for addressing God. But when you pray (proseuche), go to your inner room, close the door, and pray (proseuxai) to your Father in secret (Mt 6:6).     Spirit & Truth Fellowship International (not Catholic) say about parakaleo & proseuchomai: "The Greek verb parakaleō (#3870 parakale,w) and its noun form paraklēsis (#3874 para,klhsij) have a very wide range of meaning. Further, they appear quite often in scripture (109 verb uses; 29 noun uses). The words’ basic meaning is to call to one’s side. “To call some one hither, that he may do something…to use persuasion with him” (Bullinger). The calling along can be meant to appeal or plead; encourage or urge; to comfort; summon or invite; only once is it applied to God and that by the Lord Jesus (Matt 26:53)."   "The Greek verb proseuchomai (#4336 proseu,comai) and its noun form proseuche (#4335 proseuch,), like euchomai and euche, denote prayer in the more general sense. This means the content of the prayer may include various specific requests (aitema), supplications (deēsis), intercessions (enteuxis), etc. However proseuchomai and proseuche are only used as prayer to God (the prefix pros means towards)—whereas euchomai and deēsis are not restricted in this way (Trench, Synonyms). It generally “seems to indicate not so much the contents of the prayer as its end and aim” (Thayer)."   To summarise: Catholics use one meaning of ‘pray’ (Greek parakaleo) when addressing Mary and a different meaning of ‘pray’ (Greek proseuchomai) when addressing God.        

      in General Faith

    • Jehovah's Witnesses and praying to Jesus in John 14:14

      John 14:14
      If you ask Me anything in My name, I will do it. (NASB - the boldface is mine)  This passage teaches that the Lord Jesus is to be prayed to.[*1]  Since the Jehovah's Witnesses teach that the Lord Jesus is not to be prayed to[*2] it is worth noting that in their 'Kingdom Interlinear Translation of the Greek Scriptures' the "Me" appears in John 14:14. 
      The boldface below is mine
      if ever    anything    you should ask         me        in        the      name        of me      this         I shall do
        ἐάν          τι                  αἰτήσητέ                 με         ἐν        τῷ      ὀνόματί       μου       τοῦτο       ποιήσω.  https://wol.jw.org/en/wol/b/r1/lp-e/int/E/1985/43/14#s=13&study=discover   But when this passage is translated into their 'New World Translation of the Holy Scriptures' the "Me" disappears.
      If you ask anything in my name, I will do it.
      https://wol.jw.org/en/wol/bl/r1/lp-e?q=John 14%3A14    
      Before accusing them of doctrinal bias I have one question for any Jehovah's Witness:
      Is there any other instance in the 'New World Translation of the Holy Scriptures' where a Greek word was not translated into English that would alter the meaning of the passage to the level it does in John 14:14?       [*1] https://rdtwot.wordpress.com/2011/07/13/hear-o-lord-praying-to-jesus-–-a-survey-of-commentaries-on-john-1414/   [*2]  The Watchtower: There is no provision for members of the congregation to communicate directly with Jesus or to pray to him, but they certainly should—yes, must—pray to Jesus’ Father, Jehovah God. (Should You Pray to Jesus?, December 15, 1994)
      https://wol.jw.org/en/wol/d/r1/lp-e/1994923
       

      in Arianism

×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.