Jump to content

The Protestant Community

Christian and Theologically Protestant? Or, sincerely inquiring about the Protestant faith? Welcome to Christforums the Christian Protestant community. You'll first need to register in order to join our community. Create or respond to threads on your favorite topics and subjects. Registration takes less than a minute, it's simple, fast, and free! Enjoy the fellowship! God bless, Christforums' Staff
Register now

Fenced Community

Christforums is a Protestant Christian forum, open to Bible-believing Christians such as Presbyterians, Lutherans, Reformed, Baptists, Church of Christ members, Pentecostals, Anglicans. Methodists, Charismatics, or any other conservative, Nicene- derived Christian Church. We do not solicit cultists of any kind, including Mormons, Jehovah's Witnesses, Eastern Lightning, Falun Gong, Unification Church, Aum Shinrikyo, Christian Scientists or any other non-Nicene, non-Biblical heresy.
Register now

Christian Fellowship

John Calvin puts forward a very simple reason why love is the greatest gift: “Because faith and hope are our own: love is diffused among others.” In other words, faith and hope benefit the possessor, but love always benefits another. In John 13:34–35 Jesus says, “A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.” Love always requires an “other” as an object; love cannot remain within itself, and that is part of what makes love the greatest gift.
Faber

Staying up to (and past) midnight to ring in the new year

Recommended Posts

 It's pretty much just another night to me. I think I went to sleep at about 9:45pm or so. Some/many celebrated by going out to Times Square and stood for hours (this year in the freezing rain) to see a ball drop. It struck midnight and people kissed, screamed and made noise. It all seems pointless to me. I was happy to sleep through it all. The whole thing is an event that I just don't seem even the least bit thrilled about. I will say Happy New Year to people, but that's about it.

 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Staff
16 minutes ago, Faber said:

 It's pretty much just another night to me. I think I went to sleep at about 9:45pm or so. Some/many celebrated by going out to Times Square and stood for hours (this year in the freezing rain) to see a ball drop. It struck midnight and people kissed, screamed and made noise. It all seems pointless to me. I was happy to sleep through it all. The whole thing is an event that I just don't seem even the least bit thrilled about. I will say Happy New Year to people, but that's about it.

 

 

 

I was up to around 3am. Couldn't sleep because of excitement. Looking forward to my move from California to Idaho in a couple of months. Finally found a church in Nampa Idaho and I can't wait to get there. Have been listening to sermons from their website which excites me because of their theology: https://urcnampa.org/

 

Also contacted several places to rent because my wife and I are needing a rental until she reestablishes employment. Afterwards we'll be looking into our first home purchase together.

 

I'm a little fearful but more so excited to find out exactly what God has in store for us. Been praying a lot lately about the transition.

 

Happy New Year, Faber!

 

God bless,

William

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Staff
7 minutes ago, Faber said:

Thought you were headed to Washington?

Washington is where my father and mother lived, where I was until my move to California. My father has passed as most here know last May. Idaho is where we've been planning to move now for 3 years. Idaho or Texas, but Texas doesn't rank in the top 10 Conservative states as Idaho ranks 7th. Texas has become too Liberal, many big cities in Texas such as Austin are negatively impacting the culture. A strong Red state was most desirable to us.

Share this post


Link to post

Interesting. Idaho seems really nice. Heard the winters can be tough.

 

What states ranked in the top 5?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Staff
Just now, Faber said:

Interesting. Idaho seems really nice. Heard the winters can be tough.

 

What states ranked in the top 5?

 

5 to 7 were actually in the same percentile. The margin or difference in Conservative population was that close. Alabama is ranked the number 1 Red state for Conservative population. Idaho, stay away from the northern Liberal cities. Things get more expensive there, but the population is still 49 percent Conservative. The further South the more Red. Nampa is around 60 percent Conservative. 

Share this post


Link to post

 Thanks for the information. It's good to know such information if one travels or relocates.

Share this post


Link to post
Staff

Went to Zillow and try as i might i could not find a house with blue carpet ... :classic_tongue: i really really tried

 

  • ouch 1

Share this post


Link to post

If you think biblically you don't have to stay up until midnight to welcome the new year.  In the Bible sunset is considered to be the beginning of a new day, so the new year actually begins at sunset on December 31.  I stayed up to welcome the new year as I have done for probably every year I have lived.  I am 78 years old so I have seen a lot of new years.  There have been times when I have stayed up until midnight but I doubt if I will ever be doing that in the future.

  • Love 1
  • Yay 1

Share this post


Link to post
On ‎1‎/‎1‎/‎2019 at 2:42 PM, Faber said:

 It's pretty much just another night to me. I think I went to sleep at about 9:45pm or so. Some/many celebrated by going out to Times Square and stood for hours (this year in the freezing rain) to see a ball drop. It struck midnight and people kissed, screamed and made noise. It all seems pointless to me. I was happy to sleep through it all. The whole thing is an event that I just don't seem even the least bit thrilled about. I will say Happy New Year to people, but that's about it.

 

 

 

Actually I was entertained just by hearing all of the fire works go off. I went to bed around two o'clock am ,woke up to a deafening

blast around two thirty . I put on my ear plugs and went back to sleep. My neighborhood was rather quiet . All the noise was in another neighborhood somewhat close to ours. I guess everyone ran out of fireworks by Wednesday because that was the last time I heard a single firecracker.  

  • Toast 1

Share this post


Link to post

I've always been a night owl so I was just doning my usual except for shooting off a few bottle rockets.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Staff
On 1/13/2019 at 6:20 AM, Faber said:

Californians are leaving for other western states in droves in favor of cheaper housing, and, for some, a friendlier political climate, according to Bloomberg. Cities like Reno, Nev., and Boise are capitalizing on the exodus.

 https://www.foxnews.com/us/idafornia-shirtcauses-war-of-words

 

According to a couple publications economist suggest that California's economy is unsustainable. California boasts about being the 5th largest economy but there's a very important statistic they leave out, they have THE WORST income to debt ratio in all 50 states. A testimony about the state's misspending. 

 

When I was at a company Christmas party for a medical foundation this last December I was listening to a woman talk about the labor union for nurses. She was suggesting that without the union her wages would be considerably lower. However, I couldn't help but muse that the reason why the economy in California is doomed is in large due to unions. Nobody wants to step out of the vicious circle which is spiraling downhill in a snowball fashion. The wages are driven upwards which in turn raises the cost of medical (not limited to) impacting the cost of living. An average 2 bedroom apartment at the moment runs 3200-3400 a month. In my small town outside of Santa Cruz the housing median is now 950,000 dollars. There are not many homes here that are one family homes which means to afford and sustain the cost of a house here multiple families dwell in a house.

 

As most know my move to Idaho has been planned for near three years. One of my concerns about the exodus is that Californians will move to Idaho and bring with them their failed politics and anti-Christian sentiments.

Share this post


Link to post
2 hours ago, William said:

One of my concerns about the exodus is that Californians will move to Idaho and bring with them their failed politics and anti-Christian sentiments.

 

 That's true. Many of their failed policies are like a plague that infects every other state where the go.

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Topics

    • 3 Books for Staying ‘Hitched’ to the Old Testament

      As a follow-up to my recent article “10 Reasons the Old Testament Is Important for Christians,” I wanted to suggest three books that can help you stay appropriately “hitched” to the Old Testament. 1. God’s Kingdom through God’s Covenants: A Concise Biblical Theology Peter J. Gentry and Stephen J. Wellum Crossway, 2015 The plotline of Scripture is guided by a progression of covenants between God and humans that move us from creation through the fall to redemption and unto consummation. I believe that Gentry and Wellum’s God’s Kingdom through God’s Covenants is perhaps the best brief overview of how the whole Bible progresses, integrates, and climaxes in Christ. The work is an abridged version of their massive Kingdom through Covenant: A Biblical-Theological Understanding of the Covenants, 2nd ed. (Crossway, 2018), and it’s exegetically faithful, theologically profound, and grounded in the interpretive patterns of the biblical authors themselves. Along with unpacking the nature, relationship, and development of the Adamic-Noahic, Abrahamic, Mosaic, Davidic, and new covenants, the book offers incisive reflection on Christology, the Christian life, ecclesiology, and eschatology, helpfully charting a course between dispensational and covenant theologies. If you want to get a better sense of “the whole counsel of God” (Acts 20:27), I encourage you to read this book. 2. Journeys with Jesus: Every Path in the Bible Leads Us to Christ Dennis E. Johnson P&R Publishing, 2018 When Jesus opened up the Scriptures for his disciples, showing how the Old Testament pointed to him, their hearts burned with awe and wonder (Luke 24:27, 32). I long for the church worldwide to see and savor the beauties of the divine Son from all Scripture, and Johnson’s Journeys with Jesus is a faithful guide to this end. Building off his earlier volume Him We Proclaim: Preaching Christ from All the Scriptures (P&R, 2007), this volume guides readers in how to faithfully magnify the Messiah in the initial three-fourths of the Christian Bible. Johnson shows how the Old Testament points to and finds its terminus in Jesus, and he teaches how to properly trace God’s intended theological trajectories that culminate in Christ. 3. A Biblical-Theological Introduction to the Old Testament: The Gospel Promised Edited by Miles Van Pelt Crossway, 2016 The Old Testament is less like bolts of fabric stacked against a wall and more like an intentionally crafted quilt with each square bearing its own texture and feel (i.e., author, story, and purpose) and with all the squares contributing to a greater overarching piece of art. The divine author worked through multiple human authors using different genres over a thousand-year period to proclaim a unified message of gospel hope and the glories of the coming Christ. In A Biblical-Theological Introduction to the Old Testament, numerous faculty members from Reformed Theological Seminary, each with a specialization, articulate the message(s) of each individual Old Testament book in the context of the whole canon of Christian Scripture. Van Pelt notes in the preface: “We not only work to understand the meaning of each individual book in the larger context of the Old Testament, but we also recognize, affirm, and submit to the authoritative witness of the New Testament in establishing the full and final message of the Old Testament (e.g., John 5:39, 45–47; Luke 24:25–27, 44–45; Rom. 1:1–3; Heb. 12:1–3; 1 Pet. 1:11).” To me, this hermeneutical approach is beautiful, and it’s how books seeking to capture the Old Testament’s lasting message ought to be written. Following Van Pelt’s exceptional introduction to the Old Testament as Christian Scripture, each chapter on the various biblical books follows the same six-part structure, bringing a sense of unity to the whole volume. The authors give the bulk of space in each chapter to “Message and Theology” and “Approaching the New Testament,” developing key themes or motifs and trying to capture how they contribute to an overarching kingdom message given through a covenantal structure that focuses on Christ. I’d encourage those readying to dig into an Old Testament book to first read the related chapter in this Introduction, as it will help you better understand how all the book’s parts contribute to the message of the whole and what themes you need to be aware of in order to rightly grasp the author’s point and to faithfully magnify the Messiah. Preachers and teachers should also keep this book handy, as it will aid your weekly exposition. Also, keep in mind that Michael J. Kruger has edited a companion volume titled A Biblical-Theological Introduction to the New Testament: The Gospel Realized (Crossway, 2015). Related: Why We Can’t Unhitch from the Old Testament (Michael Kruger) The Old Covenant Is Over. The Old Testament Is Authoritative. (Thomas Schreiner) View the full article

      in Christian Current Events

    • Three Philadelphia Eagles Players Protest By Staying Off The Field During Anthem

      On Thursday evening, three players from the Philadelphia Eagles stayed behind during the national anthem before their game against the New England Patriots. While De'Vante Bausby and Malcolm Jenkins stood in the tunnel until after the anthem was finished, Michael Bennett remained in the locker room, according to NBC Philadelphia’s John Clark. The players joined the team shortly thereafter. View the full article

      in Political Conservative News

    • Bummer: Antifa Member Grounded For 2 Weeks After Staying Out Too Late At Rally

      Not good! This proud member of Antifa was grounded for a full two weeks after he stayed out too late at a rally this weekend. Aw, man! Totally not fair, dude! The 22-year-old Antifa activist had carefully stuffed his bed to make it appear that he was sleeping, and even played an audio file of […] The post Bummer: Antifa Member Grounded For 2 Weeks After Staying Out Too Late At Rally appeared first on The Babylon Bee. View the original full article

      in Christian Satire

    • Staying on Windows 7

      I've decided to stay on Windows 7. Apart from the possibility of the PC running faster under Windows 10 (some reports say it will) I can't see any advantages for me with the programs I run. Windows 7 does all I want and the old programs I have work on it.   One problem with auto upgrades (such as WIndows 10 will use and as happens with Firefox and Thunderbird) is that every now and then the supplier makes some significant change that just seems to mess things up and/or takes away some useful facility.   Any other "luddites" like me staying on Windows 7?  

      in Computers & Technology

×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.