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Knotical

Loving Jesus but not the Church

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In today's sermon our pastor made an illustration about what it can mean when someone says they love Jesus but not the visible church.  Before I go into the illustration he used, what are your thoughts about this?

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6 minutes ago, Knotical said:

In today's sermon our pastor made an illustration about what it can mean when someone says they love Jesus but not the visible church.  Before I go into the illustration he used, what are your thoughts about this?

First verse that came to mind, 1 John 4:20 "If someone says, "I love God," but hates a Christian brother or sister, that person is a liar; for if we don't love people we can see, how can we love God, whom we cannot see?"

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The passage of today's sermon was all of Psalms 122.

 

Imagine you are standing up as the best man in the wedding of your best friend.  As the bride starts down the isle and your friend's face lights up you lean over and say, "I love you man, but I have to tell you I think your bride is an ugly whore."

 

Kind of hits you where it hurts, but that is exactly what the church is to Christ, His bride.

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47 minutes ago, Knotical said:

The passage of today's sermon was all of Psalms 122.

 

Imagine you are standing up as the best man in the wedding of your best friend.  As the bride starts down the isle and your friend's face lights up you lean over and say, "I love you man, but I have to tell you I think your bride is an ugly whore."

 

Kind of hits you where it hurts, but that is exactly what the church is to Christ, His bride.

I disagree, those that are saved and sealed by God the Holy Spirit equals "Church", this body of believers are in the fathers hands, washed by the blood of Jesus Christ, we are righteous through him.

 

To put a claim of "Whore" upon the true "Church" is somewhat blasphemous in my opinion.

 

You can't justify buildings waving rainbow flags, having homosexuals standing at pulpits spewing out liberalism as "Church"?

 

It appears you are confused in your definition of "Church"?

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2 minutes ago, Truth7t7 said:

I disagree, those that are saved and sealed by God the Holy Spirit equals "Church", this body of believers are in the fathers hands, washed by the blood of Jesus Christ, we are righteous through him.

 

To put a claim of "Whore" upon the true "Church" is somewhat blasphemous in my opinion.

 

You can't justify buildings waving rainbow flags, having homosexuals standing at pulpits spewing out liberalism as "Church"?

 

It appears you are confused in your definition of "Church"?

No, I know exactly what the Church is.  It is made up of those who are called by God.  Sure, there are plenty of organizations who may consider themselves as part of it, but only God truly knows who is included.

 

But, the illustration points to those people, who are most likely not called by God, but still identify as Christian, but try to distance themselves from the ugly things those who call themselves Christian do.

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29 minutes ago, Knotical said:

No, I know exactly what the Church is.  It is made up of those who are called by God.  Sure, there are plenty of organizations who may consider themselves as part of it, but only God truly knows who is included.

 

But, the illustration points to those people, who are most likely not called by God, but still identify as Christian, but try to distance themselves from the ugly things those who call themselves Christian do.

Those that are false Christians aren't called "Church" they are called "wolves in sheep's clothing", you will know them by their fruits.

 

Many will proclaim to Jesus that they knew him in the day of judgment, he will say I knew you not, "workers of iniquity"

 

Matthew 7:15-18KJV

15 Beware of false prophets, which come to you in sheep's clothing, but inwardly they are ravening wolves.

16 Ye shall know them by their fruits. Do men gather grapes of thorns, or figs of thistles?

17 Even so every good tree bringeth forth good fruit; but a corrupt tree bringeth forth evil fruit.

18 A good tree cannot bring forth evil fruit, neither can a corrupt tree bring forth good fruit.

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11 hours ago, Knotical said:

The passage of today's sermon was all of Psalms 122.

 

Imagine you are standing up as the best man in the wedding of your best friend.  As the bride starts down the isle and your friend's face lights up you lean over and say, "I love you man, but I have to tell you I think your bride is an ugly whore."

 

Kind of hits you where it hurts, but that is exactly what the church is to Christ, His bride.

The irony is that the "ugly whore" may best initially describe the church before she was sanctified and washed in the word. 

 

11 hours ago, Truth7t7 said:

You can't justify buildings waving rainbow flags, having homosexuals standing at pulpits spewing out liberalism as "Church"?

Generally the liberal congregations exclude themselves from the universal catholic church. 

 

10 hours ago, Truth7t7 said:

Many will proclaim to Jesus that they knew him in the day of judgment, he will say I knew you not, "workers of iniquity"

Yup, that's what Jesus may say on the last day. Nobody else but Jesus is qualified to make such a judgment.

 

God bless,

William

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5 hours ago, William said:

The irony is that the "ugly whore" may best initially describe the church before she was sanctified and washed in the word. 

 

Generally the liberal congregations exclude themselves from the universal catholic church. 

 

Yup, that's what Jesus may say on the last day. Nobody else but Jesus is qualified to make such a judgment.

 

God bless,

William

William what is your position on homosexuality in general?

 

I live in So Cal and there are several person's, male and female actively practicing homosexuals, while they stand behind pulpits and proclaim to be the body of Jesus Christ his Church.

 

These homosexuals, and many denominations don't view practicing homosexuality as being sin? 

 

We will disagree, many homosexuals standing behind pulpits, profess they are God's Church, and they are his leaders.

Edited by Truth7t7

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Just now, Truth7t7 said:

William what is your position on homosexuality in general?

 

I live in So Cal and there are several person's, male and female active practicing homosexual, standing behind pulpits and proclaiming to be the body of Jesus Christ his Church.

 

These homosexuals, and many denominations don't view practicing homosexuality as being sin? 

 

We will disagree, many homosexuals standing behind pulpits, profess they are God's Church, and they are his leaders.

Generally practicing homosexuals belong to congregations which do not enforce church discipline in both life and doctrine. These very same congregations reject the historical creeds and confessions which establish the universal catholic church from scripture. All I am saying is that every member of the catholic church submits to church discipline, and I'm not interested in those outside the catholic church which decide to form book clubs. 

 

1 Corinthians 5 clearly defines the appropriate actions of the church in discipline, they are already cast out of the church and left to Satan by their very rejection of the catholic church. 

 

God bless,

William

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Homosexuality, according to the bible, is a sin.  Therefore, any individual, especially a leader in the church, who lives that kind of lifestyle is willfully living in sin, and will be judged for it.

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There's no reason a Christian would hate the Church, such people are Pharisees and full out heretics who reject what the Bible teaches.

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4 hours ago, Innerfire89 said:

There's no reason a Christian would hate the Church, such people are Pharisees and full out heretics who reject what the Bible teaches.

Practicing homosexuals standing behind pulpits, proclaiming they are Christ's Church?

 

Is that your definition of Church?

Edited by Truth7t7

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1 hour ago, Truth7t7 said:

Practicing homosexuals standing behind pulpits, proclaiming they are Christ's Church?

 

Is that your definition of Church?

No, absolutely not. Why do you ask?

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7 hours ago, Innerfire89 said:

No, absolutely not. Why do you ask?

Great just checking, I'm somewhat new and getting to know posters.

Edited by Truth7t7
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On ‎11‎/‎4‎/‎2018 at 8:04 PM, Knotical said:

In today's sermon our pastor made an illustration about what it can mean when someone says they love Jesus but not the visible church.  Before I go into the illustration he used, what are your thoughts about this?

There are many visible churches confessing Jesus . But there is only one genuine Church , and that' s the one Christ died for and redeemed a people chosen unto Himself by His shed blood on the cross. Matt.16: 17-18 The CC uses this passage to justify their belief that theirs is the true church . They use Peter as being the "Rock" when in fact Jesus is referring to Himself as the Rock . 2nd.Sam. 22: 2 - end of the chapter .

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