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H03

Education

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Georgia wanting parents to opt in to CP, in schools. 

Members opinions! I believe it should stay in the home.

Harriet 

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Staff

I have no idea of what you are posting about? SPLANE please?

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1 hour ago, Faber said:

CP = Corporal Punishment

 

?

Sounds right ..thanks 

 

With the way teachers are today i say no way .. How many swats does 'Johnny ' get for saying ''yes mam' to a teacher

 

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On one hand corporal punishment does some good, but teachers do abuse their authority.

 

For younger children it makes more sense, but with high school kids it's not that big of a deal.

When I was in high school the punishment for regular bad behaviour was paddling or Saturday school, which is just 3 hours of detention on a Saturday, or suspension.

If I got in trouble I would beg to be paddled, I didn't want to give up my Saturday. And this one teacher really had it out for me, any reason she could find to paddle me she would, thankfully she was kinda scrawny and couldn't swing that hard.

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It totally creeps me out that someone in authority might use this for sexual gratification in some weird pathetic way.

 

 

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7 minutes ago, Faber said:

It totally creeps me out that someone in authority might use this for sexual gratification in some weird pathetic way.

 

 

Schools are deffinitly not immune to perverts. There was a coach in my school who used to swat the girls on the butt when they walked by, a few years later it turned out that he was having a sexual relationship with one of them.

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On ‎9‎/‎13‎/‎2018 at 4:06 PM, Innerfire89 said:

On one hand corporal punishment does some good, but teachers do abuse their authority.

 

For younger children it makes more sense, but with high school kids it's not that big of a deal.

When I was in high school the punishment for regular bad behaviour was paddling or Saturday school, which is just 3 hours of detention on a Saturday, or suspension.

If I got in trouble I would beg to be paddled, I didn't want to give up my Saturday. And this one teacher really had it out for me, any reason she could find to paddle me she would, thankfully she was kinda scrawny and couldn't swing that hard.

We were more afraid of what the teachers told the parents and the " corporal punishment " they ( the parents ) had in store for us than any punishment metered out by the teacher. Actually any kind of physical punishment was unheard of when I was in grade school. Kids really never needed such a thing because there were rules to follow and it was reasonably understood that they were to be followed . I'm surprised to hear of any corporal punishment being used in todays schools since there are many rights groups looking to run to the defense of any misbehaving kid.

Proverbs 22:6 

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1 hour ago, Matthew Duvall said:

We were more afraid of what the teachers told the parents and the " corporal punishment " they ( the parents ) had in store for us than any punishment metered out by the teacher. Actually any kind of physical punishment was unheard of when I was in grade school. Kids really never needed such a thing because there were rules to follow and it was reasonably understood that they were to be followed . I'm surprised to hear of any corporal punishment being used in todays schools since there are many rights groups looking to run to the defense of any misbehaving kid.

Proverbs 22:6 

Sadly I didn't have much discipline as a child, buts that's another story.

I grew up and went to school in Florida up till the 6th grade, they didn't use corporal punishment there,  but I moved to Mississippi where they used paddling, I didn't know there was such a thing unroll then. Mississippi is a little old fashioned. I thinks it's mostly in the southern states where they still use corporal punishment. One time I've heard of a school that used a bamboo cane in Tennessee I think.

 

Schools have more than they can handle with misbehavior and sadly parents are basically sending thier kids to be raised by the secular, godless school system.

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On ‎9‎/‎13‎/‎2018 at 12:50 PM, H03 said:

Georgia wanting parents to opt in to CP, in schools. 

Members opinions! I believe it should stay in the home.

Harriet 

I don't know , but is this a particularly good idea ? It's almost like having other people raise your kids . What would it be like if the child were beaten to a pulp ? Then there are the subsequent law suits that have to be considered . Let discipline stay at home .        M

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I agree that discipline like this should remain at home.  Too much room for abuse.

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Doesn't current education in secular schools promote casual sex, abortion, and even discriminate against the father and his role in the family? In essence broken families are the norm and the education promotes it. Isn't it a social welfare program which basis was believed that the more educated people were the lower the crime rate?

 

They're doing a wonderful job now! Why not more of a good thing?

 

<sarcasm>

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Throwing out prayer to God and Bible readings along with the simple posting of the Ten Commandments while throwing in evolution, LBGT acceptance/promotion and moral relativism makes me want to throw up.

 

 With 'standards' like the above and from William's post what could go wrong? :classic_wacko:

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2 minutes ago, Faber said:

With 'standards' like the above what could go wrong? :classic_wacko:

I like your sarcasm. We should have sarcasm Mondays!

 

Recently I posted my new method. I'd like to hear and read similar thought from you Faber! I think you are too witty to resist!

 

 

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Go into the public school and ask for a condom. You'll practically be congratulated for wanting to practice safe sex.

Go into the public school and ask for a prayer. You'll be either looked at in total dismay/shock or you'll be sent to the principal to explain why you are trying to promote religion in school.

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23 minutes ago, Faber said:

This condom nation is heading for God's condemnation.

I think you have an idea for a bumper sticker, right there.

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When I went to school for school in Watts district of Los Angeles, they still paddled students. In grade school, the teacher could carry it out, and is was abused some. By the time I got to middle school, 1958, they still paddled but only certain people could carry that out. They had a Vice Principal for boys and one for Girls, and they handled the CP for their respective sexes. I don't think they could have controlled the populus otherwise. They were barely controlled as it was. They had separate reform schools for boys and girls that were run like prisons.   :classic_cool:

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On ‎9‎/‎15‎/‎2018 at 6:55 PM, William said:

Doesn't current education in secular schools promote casual sex, abortion, and even discriminate against the father and his role in the family? In essence broken families are the norm and the education promotes it. Isn't it a social welfare program which basis was believed that the more educated people were the lower the crime rate?

 

They're doing a wonderful job now! Why not more of a good thing?

 

<sarcasm>

Amazing how we couldn't define these words if our lives depended upon it. The fact is that we ( perhaps nieve ) never heard of the words such as sex, abortion , and yes,,,even same sex marriages. How times have changed !!    M

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