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John Calvin puts forward a very simple reason why love is the greatest gift: “Because faith and hope are our own: love is diffused among others.” In other words, faith and hope benefit the possessor, but love always benefits another. In John 13:34–35 Jesus says, “A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.” Love always requires an “other” as an object; love cannot remain within itself, and that is part of what makes love the greatest gift.
Becky

Noah's Flood

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Hoping for a discussion of Noah's flood, not the classic battle of  whole world or known world, not the science but the nuances, of the meanings of the events written in Genesis.

Who was taken who was left?

Why are the times written so clear?

example: Gen_7:11  In the six hundredth year of Noah's life, in the second month, the seventeenth day of the month, the same day were all the fountains of the great deep broken up, and the windows of heaven were opened. 

How does Noah's flood relate to the New Covenant? 

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Hello Becky

Do you believe in types?

Do you believe there will be such a thing as a pre trib rapture?

Then how about Noah typing the nominal church which must go through the tribulation and Enoch typing the bride that goes up.

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@2404  wow a user name i dont have to learn to spell. 

 

The Scrioptures are full of typology.

And way to often we can find them when they aint there  :classic_laugh:

Yes there are types

No i do not believe in pretrib rapture.

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On 7/24/2018 at 10:27 AM, Becky said:

Hoping for a discussion of Noah's flood, not the classic battle of  whole world or known world, not the science but the nuances, of the meanings of the events written in Genesis.

Who was taken who was left?

Why are the times written so clear?

example: Gen_7:11  In the six hundredth year of Noah's life, in the second month, the seventeenth day of the month, the same day were all the fountains of the great deep broken up, and the windows of heaven were opened. 

How does Noah's flood relate to the New Covenant? 

 

Per OT Hebrew reckoning, 150 days = five months.

 

Gen 7:24
24 And the waters prevailed upon the earth an hundred and fifty days.
KJV

 

Rev 12:15-16
15 And the serpent cast out of his mouth water as a flood after the woman, that he might cause her to be carried away of the flood.

16 And the earth helped the woman, and the earth opened her mouth, and swallowed up the flood which the dragon cast out of his mouth.
KJV

 

Rev 9:4-5
4 And it was commanded them that they should not hurt the grass of the earth, neither any green thing, neither any tree; but only those men which have not the seal of God in their foreheads.

5 And to them it was given that they should not kill them, but that they should be tormented five months: and their torment was as the torment of a scorpion, when he striketh a man.
KJV

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We see a cleansing like you said @Faber

There is a renewing

We see an elect

Obedience 

WOW did Noah have faith.

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2 hours ago, davy said:


Per OT Hebrew reckoning, 150 days = five months.

Nope!  Hebrew months alternate between 29 and 30 days.  Five months could never add up to a total of 150 days.

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30 minutes ago, Origen said:

Nope!  Hebrew months alternate between 29 and 30 days.  Five months could never add up to a total of 150 days.

HOORAY!  We finally found a number of days and nights where no part of a day or night could have been included in the total number of days.  It must be the infamous "lost idiom" we have been seeking in another thread. 🙂

Edited by atpollard
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Greetings Becky !

You have raise some very astute and intriguing questions.

Here are a few of ways in which some Protestants have wrestled with the pericope under discussion:

 

Quote

11 “In the 600th … on the 17th day.” The fullness and precision of the dates in the flood narrative are astonishing (7:12, 17, 24; 8:3, 4, 5, 6, 10, 12, 13, 14); only Ezekiel in dating his prophecies (e.g., 1:1; 3:16, etc.) approaches Gen 7–8 in this regard. These dates have therefore attracted much inconclusive study (cf. S. E. McEvenue, Narrative Style of the Priestly Writer, 55–59; G. Larsson, VT 27 [1977] 490–92; ZAW 97 [1985] 323–25; N. P. Lemche, JSOT 18 [1980] 52–62; F. H. Cryer, Bib 66 [1985] 241–67). Given our ignorance of the calendars used in OT times, it is impossible to be dogmatic about the significance of the dates in the flood story. The dates may of course simply be mentioned to underline the factuality of the flood, to give assurance that it really happened.

Wenham, Gordon J. Genesis 1–15. Vol. 1. Dallas: Word, Incorporated, 1998. Print. Word Biblical Commentary.

 

 

Quote

7:11–12 The day of eruption is marked by a specific date, the “seventeenth day of the second month” of Noah’s six hundredth year (v. 11). So momentous is the event that the narration underscores its commencement, “on that day” (v. 11) and “on that very day” (v. 13). Such phrases designate significant events in the life of later Israel. “On that day” distinguishes the entrance of Israel into Sinai, and “on that very day” acclaims Abraham’s circumcision (17:23, 26), the Passover exodus (Exod 12:41, 51), and Moses’ death (Deut 32:48). Some one year and eleven days later the earth returns to its former state (see 8:14).
Typically, the Bible marks significant events by citing the year of the reigning monarch, as we find in the prophets, or by catastrophic events (e.g., Ezek 40:1; Amos 1:1). The means for dating the flood is the life of its chief survivor. By Noah’s lifetime the life spans of the antediluvian and postdiluvian patriarchs can be coordinated (Gen 5; 11). “Second month” assumes a New Year, but two calendars were used by the Hebrews in their history, one with the New Year in the autumn (Exod 23:16; 34:22), and another beginning the New Year in the spring (Exod 12:2, 18; Deut 16:1, 6). Which is meant here remains uncertain, but the mention of “seedtime” in 8:22 may suggest the flood begins in the autumnal New Year with its heavy rains. Unlike the Mesopotamian flood stories, the biblical account sets the event in a historical framework. For the author of Genesis the flood event is as real as the birth of Abraham.


Mathews, K. A. Genesis 1-11:26. Vol. 1A. Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1996.  The New American Commentary.

 

 

Quote

The time when the flood commenced is said to have been the 600th year of Noah’s life, on the 17th day of the second month (v. 11). The months must be reckoned, not according to the Mosaic ecclesiastical year, which commenced in the spring, but according to the natural or civil year, which commenced in the autumn at the beginning of sowing time, or the autumnal equinox; so that the flood would be pouring upon the earth in October and November. “The same day were all the fountains of the great deep (תְּהֹום the unfathomable ocean) broken up, and the sluices (windows, lattices) of heaven opened, and there was (happened, came) pouring rain (גֶּשֶׁם in distinction from מָטָר) upon the earth 40 days and 40 nights.” Thus the flood was produced by the bursting forth of fountains hidden within the earth, which drove seas and rivers above their banks, and by rain which continued incessantly for 40 days and 40 nights.

Keil, Carl Friedrich, and Franz Delitzsch. Commentary on the Old Testament. Vol. 1. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 1996. 

 

 

....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

חֶסֶד וְרַחֲמִים וְשָׁלוֹם מֵאֵת אֱלֹהִים הָאָב וְהַמָּשִׁיחַ יֵשׁוּעַ אֲדוֹנֵנוּ

χάρις, ἔλεος, εἰρήνη ἀπὸ θεοῦ πατρὸς καὶ χριστοῦ Ἰησοῦ τοῦ κυρίου ἡμῶν.

Grace, mercy, peace, from Father God and Messiah Jesus our Lord.

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Here is one way of thinking through the context of the texts on Noah.

 

Noah.thumb.jpg.a753b2a3de01040605c9d84c02d10ca8.jpg

 

 

Tom Constable’s Expository Notes on the Bible. Galaxie Software, 2003. (screen shot from my Logos Library)

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