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SovereignGraceSingles

Welcome to SovereignGraceSingles.com. Where Reformed Faith and Romance Come Together! We are the only Christian dating website for Christian Singles in the Reformed Faith worldwide. Our focus is to bring together Christian singles of all ages. Reformed single Christian men and women who wish to meet other Reformed Christian singles for spiritually, like-minded, loving relationships.

SovereignGraceSingles

Then the Lord God said, “It is not good for the man to be alone; I will make him a helper suitable for him.” - Genesis 2:18

SovereignGraceSingles

Meet Like Minded Believers Can two walk together except they be agreed? - Amos 3:3

SovereignGraceSingles

John Calvin puts forward a very simple reason why love is the greatest gift: “Because faith and hope are our own: love is diffused among others.” In other words, faith and hope benefit the possessor, but love always benefits another. In John 13:34–35 Jesus says, “A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.” Love always requires an “other” as an object; love cannot remain within itself, and that is part of what makes love the greatest gift.

SovereignGraceSingles

SGS offers a "fenced" community: both for private single members and also a public Protestant forums open to Bible-believing Christians such as Presbyterians, Lutherans, Reformed, Baptists, Church of Christ members, Pentecostals, Anglicans. Methodists, Charismatics, or any other conservative, Nicene-derived Christian Church.
William

GDPR

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William
Staff

Is everyone familiar with the GDPR?

 

"The European Union (EU) made an impact across the globe with passage of the GDPR in May 2016. When it goes into effect on May 25, 2018, all organizations doing business with EU Data Subjects must comply with the regulation. Failure to act quickly to prepare for the regulation could have serious consequences—to an organization’s bottom line, customer relationships and brand image. "

 

What I take issue with is the application of EU law here in America which may subject web owners to frivolous lawsuits. As "was" a server or website located in any country was subject to that particular country's laws. The EU has decided to "proclaim and claim" that all countries must abide by this new law. Basically if a EU citizen request that this site delete all data we must comply. 

 

I am open for edification, but as is now our software can anonyminize posts and remove all data. What gets to me is that I am required to by EU law. What do you think? I am tempted to make a privacy policy suggesting that the EU has no jurisdiction here, but if you ask nicely I may fulfill the request to delete all data supplied by a member at a later time. 

 

I have no idea why so many Americans see no issue with this or handing jurisdiction to second rate non leaders of economy. It is usually the practice of economic leaders to set the code or law for other nations to follow, isn't it?

 

God bless,

William

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deade

I believe it is a test, trying to determine who will and who won't surrender their sovereignty. You are right to raise a stink about this. They are already trying to take away sovereignty by implementing UN laws on member countries. If we go along, we may as well throw away our Constitution and Bill of Rights.

 

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Becky
Moderator

Time for another Tea Party.. 

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reformed baptist

@William

 

I get what your saying - I'm not entirely happy about GDPR myself (the paperwork and other hoops we have had to jump through as a church are just too much) however part of the thinking behind the laws is a push back in response to many ways giant companies like Google and facebook misuse our data - and I think that is a good thing. 

 

Also, the 'right to be forgotten' which seems to be your biggest concern has long been enshrined in the law of many lands (and it isn't without precedent in US law - although there does seem to be some conflict with freedom of speech laws in the US)  however even in GDPR it is not absolute - as I understand the law if a person has given us information and consented to our holding of that data then we are entitled to hold that data for as long as we can justifying keeping it.   

 

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William
Staff
8 hours ago, reformed baptist said:

@William

 

I get what your saying - I'm not entirely happy about GDPR myself (the paperwork and other hoops we have had to jump through as a church are just too much) however part of the thinking behind the laws is a push back in response to many ways giant companies like Google and facebook misuse our data - and I think that is a good thing. 

 

Also, the 'right to be forgotten' which seems to be your biggest concern has long been enshrined in the law of many lands (and it isn't without precedent in US law - although there does seem to be some conflict with freedom of speech laws in the US)  however even in GDPR it is not absolute - as I understand the law if a person has given us information and consented to our holding of that data then we are entitled to hold that data for as long as we can justifying keeping it.   

 

Check this out: http://www.breitbart.com/tech/2018/05/25/facebook-and-google-face-8-8-billion-lawsuits-on-first-day-of-new-eu-data-laws/

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Civilwarbuff
42 minutes ago, William said:

The paper this AM said there were quite a few sites that were blocking themselves from EU countries.  I stopped using FB years ago when I realized what they were doing.  

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William
Staff
21 minutes ago, Civilwarbuff said:

The paper this AM said there were quite a few sites that were blocking themselves from EU countries.  I stopped using FB years ago when I realized what they were doing.  

I have no idea why so many have no issue with handing out sovereignty to another nation. As far as blocking the EU I guess the intelligence community is not subject to these laws? Personally I think our CIA and NSA should cease sharing information with the EU while this law exists. We wouldn't want to collect and maintain info on suspected terrorist if it means violating the GDPR!

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Knotical

This will fly in the face of record retention laws, and will be very hard, if not impossible, to enforce.  Of course if someone from the EU decided to sue the owner of a small website, like this one, the owner won't have much choice but to comply with the demands, otherwise, they will have to hire an expensive lawyer to fight the suit.

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Civilwarbuff

What will be interesting is what happens when the EU fines a company who has no physical presence there; will Mexico, or China be willing to enforce an EU judgement against companies that they may be hosting?  Should the rest of the world be required to enforce EU law?  This is gonna be interesting.....stay tuned.

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