Jump to content

SovereignGraceSingles

Welcome to SovereignGraceSingles.com. Where Reformed Faith and Romance Come Together! We are the only Christian dating website for Christian Singles in the Reformed Faith worldwide. Our focus is to bring together Christian singles of all ages. Reformed single Christian men and women who wish to meet other Reformed Christian singles for spiritually, like-minded, loving relationships.

SovereignGraceSingles

Then the Lord God said, “It is not good for the man to be alone; I will make him a helper suitable for him.” - Genesis 2:18

SovereignGraceSingles

Meet Like Minded Believers Can two walk together except they be agreed? - Amos 3:3

SovereignGraceSingles

John Calvin puts forward a very simple reason why love is the greatest gift: “Because faith and hope are our own: love is diffused among others.” In other words, faith and hope benefit the possessor, but love always benefits another. In John 13:34–35 Jesus says, “A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.” Love always requires an “other” as an object; love cannot remain within itself, and that is part of what makes love the greatest gift.

SovereignGraceSingles

SGS offers a "fenced" community: both for private single members and also a public Protestant forums open to Bible-believing Christians such as Presbyterians, Lutherans, Reformed, Baptists, Church of Christ members, Pentecostals, Anglicans. Methodists, Charismatics, or any other conservative, Nicene-derived Christian Church.
Sign in to follow this  
Support

4 Ways the Church Can Help Those with Mental Illness

Recommended Posts

Support

“The flesh can bear only a certain number of wounds and no more, but the soul can bleed in ten thousand ways, and die over and over again each hour.” Those are words from the iconic 19th century pastor/theologian, Charles H. Spurgeon, who personally understood the silent, unnamed pains of depression.Just as we are not immune to physical health problems, people of faith are not immune to mental and emotional suffering. The psalmist cried out, “Darkness is my only friend” (Ps. 88:18). Many people in our churches relate to this ongoing sense of loneliness and despair.

Spurgeon’s self-awareness and candor were ahead of his time, but we now know it is estimated that half of us will experience some form of mental illness in our lifetime. “Combining the child and adult populations, more than fifty million Americans today experience at least one diagnosable mental health disorder on any given day. And it’s reported that there are 123 suicides in the U.S. every single day.

As pastors and churches invite people to follow Jesus, we also invite them to bring all of their brokenness into our community of faith. Jesus reconciles people to God, but he will not restore all that sin has stolen until he returns again. So until then, we serve people in their suffering. We voluntarily walk with them through the maze of their emotional, physical, relational, and spiritual challenges. Rather than viewing them as new recruits to serve our church goals, we eagerly join God’s redeeming work in their lives.

The complexities of mental health issues, however, strain pastors and churches in some very practical ways. While we want to help, we are not always sure of our role in diagnosis and treatment of those who suffer in this way. So let’s consider these four guidelines for serving people facing mental health issues:

Photo courtesy: ©Thinkstock/Evgeny-Gromov

 

 

 

 

More...

Share this post


Link to post
Sue D.

A person needs to be willing to acknowledge their need. And be willing to accept help.

Share this post


Link to post
Just Mike

For a Pastor its time well spent to take some college or seminary classes in Counseling. The likelihood of someone needing counseling during their ministry is a certainty. A pastor can not always refer a church member to a mental health professional every time someone comes in with a mental problem. Knowing when a persons problem is beyond their ability to help is just as important. Most people facing short term spiritual and mental problems are helped by someone just listening with caring Christian love and sharing a Bible verse and prayer helps a person on a short term basis. Sometimes a few visits helps most people with minor problems. Just basic Biblical Counseling training is all that is needed for this type of counseling However, beyond basic Biblical Counseling many pastors are not trained to deal with those with real Mental Illness. Only those pastors that have completed classes and taken clinical training should counsel people on a long term basis,

 

Mental illnesses should be diagnosed only by a Psychologist or Psychiatrist. Knowing when to refer a person for mental health professionals should be part of every pastors training is seminary. Asking other Ministers who they use when referring someone for help is well worth while. Denominational leaders might be a help in finding help might be good as well.

 

In the last four decades most all of the Christian Psychologists I met with were secular humanist. Just because someone says they are a Christian Psychologist does not mean they use the Scripture in any way in their counseling, it just means they personally are Christians. For pastors, and families always ask if a Psychologist uses the Bible in their counseling, other wise you do not know what kind of Christian counselor they are.

Share this post


Link to post
Sue D.
For a Pastor its time well spent to take some college or seminary classes in Counseling. The likelihood of someone needing counseling during their ministry is a certainty. A pastor can not always refer a church member to a mental health professional every time someone comes in with a mental problem. Knowing when a persons problem is beyond their ability to help is just as important. Most people facing short term spiritual and mental problems are helped by someone just listening with caring Christian love and sharing a Bible verse and prayer helps a person on a short term basis. Sometimes a few visits helps most people with minor problems. Just basic Biblical Counseling training is all that is needed for this type of counseling However, beyond basic Biblical Counseling many pastors are not trained to deal with those with real Mental Illness. Only those pastors that have completed classes and taken clinical training should counsel people on a long term basis,

 

Mental illnesses should be diagnosed only by a Psychologist or Psychiatrist. Knowing when to refer a person for mental health professionals should be part of every pastors training is seminary. Asking other Ministers who they use when referring someone for help is well worth while. Denominational leaders might be a help in finding help might be good as well.

 

In the last four decades most all of the Christian Psychologists I met with were secular humanist. Just because someone says they are a Christian Psychologist does not mean they use the Scripture in any way in their counseling, it just means they personally are Christians. For pastors, and families always ask if a Psychologist uses the Bible in their counseling, other wise you do not know what kind of Christian counselor they are.

I was in Biblical counseling for a couple of years -- finished about a year ago. There are Lots of views concerning it and who should be doing it and the need For it at all.

 

The field of Christian Psychology -- some feel that there's no such thing. But Psychology started out very differently than it is Now. These fields Need more Christians in them.

 

And there are those who believe that a spiritual Christian should never Need counseling. So -- apparently -- there are a lot of non-spiritual Christians. And there is Nouthetic Counseling -- use Bible Only. Nothing else is needed. That delving into the why's and wherefores' OF various problems isn't really needed. Just Stop the 'sinful activity'.

 

Many years ago I'd wanted to go into Biblical counseling. The schooling didn't work out. In the meantime, I bought many books on the subject. Some in an effort to be my own 'counselor'. Some books encourage inter-church counseling. Some discourage it.

 

Part of the discussion is probably that being called to be a pastor is preaching God's Word / studying during the week / visiting people in the hospital, various meetings in the church As Well As being a husband and parent. Counseling -- lots of times -- is 'simply' taking time To listen and sharing Scripture with a person. Being an encourager. Praying with a person. And that's possibly all people Need is someone to take time with them. And that's what Sunday School classes Can be for. Teachers taking time to relate more with those in their classes. But everyone has a 'busy schedule' -- are we simply too busy being 'busy'.

 

 

People can Also end up feeling 'strange' going to the church when they know the pastor 'knows' something about them.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...