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NetChaplain

True Consecration

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NetChaplain

Though the word “sanctification” has been often described as some type of process or progression, Scripture always presents it in its completed sense at the time of rebirth (same for righteousness and justification). Its general meaning is the same for holy and “consecration” (OT term), of which all three are perpetual one-time occurrences included with salvation, e.g. redemption. The general thought of consecration in the OT was to be set apart for God by your doing. If consecration was instructed in the present dispensation it would only involve the work of the Spirit, for all things godly are by the Spirit—in the life of Christ.

 

1 John 4:17 (“as He is”) is in reference to the spiritual position of believers in the above attributes of the Lord Jesus; 1 John 3:2 (“we shall be like Him”) is in reference to the physical condition of believers at His “appearing” (2Tim 4:1; Rom 8:23), along with of course the final absence of that which impedes perfect fellowship with God—the sinful human nature! The Son’s present position before the Father is also our present position (soon our present condition). I say “present” because our eternal presence with Them is as certain as though we are in Their presence now.

NC

 

 

 

 

 

True Consecration

 

The Lord Jesus is in glory, and I am united to Him in spirit in all His beauty and perfection. I am also left in this world to be for Him down here. The same One who has gone up there is the same One who is down here in His saints (via the Spirit of course and is how all those reborn are in one another—NC). Up there I am in all His perfection in the Holiest, sustained there in all the sweet savor of the One whom the Father has taken up.

 

This we surely all know, otherwise we do not have the sense of our acceptance with the Father. So it says, “As He is,” not as He was. “As He is, so are we.” It does not say that we shall be as He is, but that we are at this moment. It is perfectly true that I shall be like Him in the glory, but that is not what this passage says. It is, “As He is, so are we, in this world”—not in heaven. The thought is that we cannot be placed in any higher position; and any place except that one up there would neither be commensurate with the work He has wrought, nor satisfy the heart of the Father for me.

 

My apprehension of the Lord Jesus in glory at the right hand of the Father determines my expression of Him down here. See how it comes out in Paul. He says that he sees the Lord Jesus; that he has to do with Him where He is: “With open face beholding as in a glass the glory of the Lord, are changed into the same image (via the “new nature” which is “after the image of Him that created him – Col 3:10—NC) from glory to glory”; and so he adds, “bearing about in the body the dying of the Lord Jesus, that the life also of Jesus might be made manifest in our body.”

 

In Romans 12 we read, “I beseech you therefor brethren, by the mercies of God, that ye present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God, which is your reasonable service.” People read this, and fancy that they are giving God something; but this is not the fact at all. In Romans 7 you find that you have a new life, a new nature, but you have also with it a very unpleasant guest, which ultimately causes you to cry out, “O wretched man that I am! Who shall deliver me?”

 

I long to subdue the flesh, and who does this for me? Why, Christ. “I thank God through Jesus Christ our Lord.” I say to Him: I was a sufferer from this noxious guest, but now I have got deliverance; and as it is You who have done it, I present my body to You, which is the least I can do. I give You nothing but an empty house, and You may make the most of it. “Present your bodies a living sacrifice, hoy, acceptable unto God, which is your reasonable (not legal) service; and be not conformed to this world, but be ye transformed.” It is not reformation, it is “transformation.” I find my deliverance in Christ, and now I would present my body to my Deliverer; but that body is only an empty vessel, one which He must fill Himself, and His filling is consecration.

 

Hence consecration is not that I have given Him anything, for I have nothing to give. People talk about consecrating themselves, their talents, their property, and so on, and I know is a certain sense what they mean; but the fact really is, that I put aside everything in me which would hinder the expression of Christ flowing out of me, that the life of Jesus may be made manifest in my body.

 

For this Paul prays in Ephesians 3, “that Christ may dwell in your hearts”: the true force of the word is domicile. That He may so dwell there that we “may be able to comprehend with all saints what is the breadth, and length, and depth, and height” of our Father’s own favor—the full scope of blessing; “and to know the love of Christ, which passeth knowledge, that ye might be filled with all the fullness of God.” Christ is that fullness, having Him thus dwell in the heart is real consecration.

 

- J B Stoney

 

 

 

Excerpt from MJS devotional for Feb. 13:

 

“The great secret of the Christian life is found in ceasing from self, in which the power of the Cross manifests itself in us.” – A M

http://www.abideabove.com/hungry-heart/

 

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Faber

Do you think consecration is equivalent to being filled with the Holy Spirit since sanctification is still to be pursued (Hebrews 12:14)?

 

William Mounce: Even after people are permanently filled with the Spirit at conversion, the Spirit can again fill them in a sense that he possesses and empowers them in a special way for a temporary, specific task, such as when Peter spoke to the Sanhedrin (Acts 4:8) and the church prayed for boldness (4:31). Paul is filled with the Spirit (9:17) and almost immediately begins to testify (9:20). He is later filled with the Spirit again and denounces Elymas the magician (13:9) (Mounce's Complete Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words, Fill, page 250).

 

 

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nolidad
Though the word “sanctification” has been often described as some type of process or progression, Scripture always presents it in its completed sense at the time of rebirth (same for righteousness and justification). Its general meaning is the same for holy and “consecration” (OT term), of which all three are perpetual one-time occurrences included with salvation, e.g. redemption. The general thought of consecration in the OT was to be set apart for God by your doing. If consecration was instructed in the present dispensation it would only involve the work of the Spirit, for all things godly are by the Spirit—in the life of Christ.

 

1 John 4:17 (“as He is”) is in reference to the spiritual position of believers in the above attributes of the Lord Jesus; 1 John 3:2 (“we shall be like Him”) is in reference to the physical condition of believers at His “appearing” (2Tim 4:1; Rom 8:23), along with of course the final absence of that which impedes perfect fellowship with God—the sinful human nature! The Son’s present position before the Father is also our present position (soon our present condition). I say “present” because our eternal presence with Them is as certain as though we are in Their presence now.

NC

 

 

 

 

 

True Consecration

 

The Lord Jesus is in glory, and I am united to Him in spirit in all His beauty and perfection. I am also left in this world to be for Him down here. The same One who has gone up there is the same One who is down here in His saints (via the Spirit of course and is how all those reborn are in one another—NC). Up there I am in all His perfection in the Holiest, sustained there in all the sweet savor of the One whom the Father has taken up.

 

This we surely all know, otherwise we do not have the sense of our acceptance with the Father. So it says, “As He is,” not as He was. “As He is, so are we.” It does not say that we shall be as He is, but that we are at this moment. It is perfectly true that I shall be like Him in the glory, but that is not what this passage says. It is, “As He is, so are we, in this world”—not in heaven. The thought is that we cannot be placed in any higher position; and any place except that one up there would neither be commensurate with the work He has wrought, nor satisfy the heart of the Father for me.

 

My apprehension of the Lord Jesus in glory at the right hand of the Father determines my expression of Him down here. See how it comes out in Paul. He says that he sees the Lord Jesus; that he has to do with Him where He is: “With open face beholding as in a glass the glory of the Lord, are changed into the same image (via the “new nature” which is “after the image of Him that created him – Col 3:10—NC) from glory to glory”; and so he adds, “bearing about in the body the dying of the Lord Jesus, that the life also of Jesus might be made manifest in our body.”

 

In Romans 12 we read, “I beseech you therefor brethren, by the mercies of God, that ye present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God, which is your reasonable service.” People read this, and fancy that they are giving God something; but this is not the fact at all. In Romans 7 you find that you have a new life, a new nature, but you have also with it a very unpleasant guest, which ultimately causes you to cry out, “O wretched man that I am! Who shall deliver me?”

 

I long to subdue the flesh, and who does this for me? Why, Christ. “I thank God through Jesus Christ our Lord.” I say to Him: I was a sufferer from this noxious guest, but now I have got deliverance; and as it is You who have done it, I present my body to You, which is the least I can do. I give You nothing but an empty house, and You may make the most of it. “Present your bodies a living sacrifice, hoy, acceptable unto God, which is your reasonable (not legal) service; and be not conformed to this world, but be ye transformed.” It is not reformation, it is “transformation.” I find my deliverance in Christ, and now I would present my body to my Deliverer; but that body is only an empty vessel, one which He must fill Himself, and His filling is consecration.

 

Hence consecration is not that I have given Him anything, for I have nothing to give. People talk about consecrating themselves, their talents, their property, and so on, and I know is a certain sense what they mean; but the fact really is, that I put aside everything in me which would hinder the expression of Christ flowing out of me, that the life of Jesus may be made manifest in my body.

 

For this Paul prays in Ephesians 3, “that Christ may dwell in your hearts”: the true force of the word is domicile. That He may so dwell there that we “may be able to comprehend with all saints what is the breadth, and length, and depth, and height” of our Father’s own favor—the full scope of blessing; “and to know the love of Christ, which passeth knowledge, that ye might be filled with all the fullness of God.” Christ is that fullness, having Him thus dwell in the heart is real consecration.

 

- J B Stoney

 

 

 

Excerpt from MJS devotional for Feb. 13:

 

“The great secret of the Christian life is found in ceasing from self, in which the power of the Cross manifests itself in us.” – A M

http://www.abideabove.com/hungry-heart/

 

Sanctification is the ongoing process of God making us what He already sees us to be

 

Hebrews 10:14

For by one offering he hath perfected for ever them that are sanctified.

 

Consecration is a one time act of something or someone being set apart for a specific use or person. Even though we fail and fall short- we are and remain consecrated unto the Lord.

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NetChaplain
Do you think consecration is equivalent to being filled with the Holy Spirit since sanctification is still to be pursued (Hebrews 12:14)?

 

William Mounce: Even after people are permanently filled with the Spirit at conversion, the Spirit can again fill them in a sense that he possesses and empowers them in a special way for a temporary, specific task, such as when Peter spoke to the Sanhedrin (Acts 4:8) and the church prayed for boldness (4:31). Paul is filled with the Spirit (9:17) and almost immediately begins to testify (9:20). He is later filled with the Spirit again and denounces Elymas the magician (13:9) (Mounce's Complete Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words, Fill, page 250).

 

 

Hi Fab, and thanks for your reply and comments! It's my understanding that sanctification and holiness are in the same category concerning their states, e.g. they do not admit in degrees (no believer is more or less in any of these than another), same for righteousness and justification, because they are always based upon Christ which is ever complete at all times. None of these attributes derive from man so can only be imputed--not imparted--for they are incommunicable to the creature (man).

 

The filling of the Spirit does not differ either because you get all of Him or none. Believers walk in the Spirit at varying levels due to varying mature levels in their understanding of the Word concerning spiritual growth, and I believe this is often confused with being filled verses walking closer.

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NetChaplain

 

Sanctification is the ongoing process of God making us what He already sees us to be

 

Hebrews 10:14

For by one offering he hath perfected for ever them that are sanctified.

 

Consecration is a one time act of something or someone being set apart for a specific use or person. Even though we fail and fall short- we are and remain consecrated unto the Lord.

 

HI Noli, and appreciate your reply! The reason why I presented "sanctified" as a single occurrence is because there is no scriptural evidence of it being used in a progressive sense, but is always used in a completed sense.

 

Blessings!

 

 

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William
Staff
Though the word “sanctification” has been often described as some type of process or progression, Scripture always presents it in its completed sense at the time of rebirth (same for righteousness and justification).

 

Correct me if wrong, but I think in Reformed Presbyterian circles what you are suggesting is called "definitive sanctification". I was reminded of it as there was a disturbance that came about when John Murray (Calvin Theological Journal 1967) began teaching a differentiation between progressive and definitive sanctification. Definitive sanctification is the notion that the Spirit creates union with Christ and constitutes us definitively sanctified by this union/identification with Christ:

 

Theologically considered, Murray's teaching that we are definitively sanctified by identification with Christ’s death and resurrection (Rom. 6) seems somewhat problematic. There is no question, in Rom. 6, believers are said to be identified with Christ, but the question arises as to how and when that identification takes place. We should agree with Mr. Murray that “vital and spiritual union” is in view in Rom. 6. We can even say that the “decisive breach” occurs at the inception of the Christian life, but it is not clear that it is terribly helpful to speak of this as “definitive sanctification.” Further, one is struck by the relative absence of any clear explanation (especially in the second essay) of the relations between faith (or sola fide) union, and definitive sanctification.

 

However, theologians such as William Ames, in his Marrow of Theology (1627; cap 29) dealt with sanctification entirely as progressive:

 

1. The real change of state is an alteration of qualities made in man himself. 2 Cor. 5. 17. Old things are past away, all things are become new.

 

2. But because it doth not consist in relation and respect, but in real effecting; therefore it admits diverse degrees, of beginning, progress, and perfection. 2. Cor. 4. 16. The inward man is renewed day by day.

 

3. This alteration of qualities doth either respect that good which is just, and honest, and it is called Sanctification: or that good which is profitable and honorable, and it is called glorification. Rom. 6. 22. Yee have your fruit in holinesse, and the end everlasting life.

 

4. Sanctification is a real change of a man from the filthiness of sin, to the purity of God’s Image. Eph. 4. 22. 23. 34.

 

God bless,

William

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NetChaplain

 

Correct me if wrong, but I think in Reformed Presbyterian circles what you are suggesting is called "definitive sanctification". I was reminded of it as there was a disturbance that came about when John Murray (Calvin Theological Journal 1967) began teaching a differentiation between progressive and definitive sanctification. Definitive sanctification is the notion that the Spirit creates union with Christ and constitutes us definitively sanctified by this union/identification with Christ:

 

 

 

However, theologians such as William Ames, in his Marrow of Theology (1627; cap 29) dealt with sanctification entirely as progressive:

 

 

 

God bless,

William

 

Hi Brother Will, and good to see your input, which is always instructional. Unless there is Scripture usage that I've yet to see using the word "sanctification," it's always used in the same sense as holiness, justification, etc. I've always found it most to be at the best advantage using Scripture.

 

Blessings!

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Eric T.
Scripture always presents it in its completed sense at the time of rebirth (same for righteousness and justification).

Hello @NetChaplain, what do you think of Hebrews 10:14, which the ESV renders as "For by a single offering he has perfected for all time those who are being sanctified." Being sanctified, rather than been sanctified makes it sound like an ongoing process to me.

 

The other comment I would make is that I hope it is a process, since if I live much longer and see no further improvement in my current state of holiness it will not be a good thing!

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NetChaplain

Hello @NetChaplain, what do you think of Hebrews 10:14, which the ESV renders as "For by a single offering he has perfected for all time those who are being sanctified." Being sanctified, rather than been sanctified makes it sound like an ongoing process to me.

 

The other comment I would make is that I hope it is a process, since if I live much longer and see no further improvement in my current state of holiness it will not be a good thing!

 

Hi Eric, and appreciate your input and comment! Just wanted to mention that the meaning of "are being sanctified" is often misunderstood to be in reference to those presently saved, which is incorrect, for it is in reference to future souls who will also be "sanctified." Just as we are made holy and righteous, which never needs repeated, the same is for sanctification, redemption, justification, etc. It's only our walk and our faith that will never be complete in this life, due to the "old man," but the believer himself (spirit and soul) is "perfected" at rebirth in Christ. No human could be in union with the Lord Jesus apart from His perfect sanctification (Heb 2:11).

 

Ellicott:

“Are sanctified”; No repetition of His offering is needed, for by one offering He hath brought all unto “perfection,” and that “forever.” In Hebrews 7:11 we have read that “perfection” did not come through the Levitical priesthood or through the law (Hebrews 10:19); the object of man’s hopes and of all priestly service has at last been attained, since through the “great High Priest” “we draw nigh to God” (Hebrews 7:19). In this is involved salvation to the uttermost (Hebrews 7:25). The last word of this verse has occurred before, in Hebrews 2:11. As was there explained, it literally means those who are being sanctified, all those who, from age to age, through faith (Hebrews 10:22) receive as their own that which has been procured for all men.

 

Adam Clark:

“Them that are sanctified” - Τους ἁγιαζομενους· Them that have received the sprinkling of the blood of this offering. These, therefore, receiving redemption through that blood, have no need of any other offering; as this was a complete atonement, purification, and title to eternal glory.

 

John Gill:

“He hath perfected forever them that are sanctified”; that is, who are sanctified by God the Father, Judges 1:1 or, who are set apart by him in eternal election, from the rest of the world, for his own use, service, and glory, to a state of grace and holiness here, and happiness hereafter; for this is not to be understood either of their being sanctified in Christ, though the Syriac version reads, "that are sanctified" in him, or by his Spirit, though both are true of the same persons.”

 

 

 

The literal rendering is as the KJV has it: Young's Literal Translation--"for by one offering he hath perfected to the end those sanctified."

 

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nolidad

 

Sanctification is the ongoing process of God making us what He already sees us to be

 

Hebrews 10:14

For by one offering he hath perfected for ever them that are sanctified.

 

Consecration is a one time act of something or someone being set apart for a specific use or person. Even though we fail and fall short- we are and remain consecrated unto the Lord.

 

HI Noli, and appreciate your reply! The reason why I presented "sanctified" as a single occurrence is because there is no scriptural evidence of it being used in a progressive sense, but is always used in a completed sense.

 

Blessings!

 

Hi Net chaplain. Hebrews 10:14 is a good example. For believers there is what is called positional truth and experiential truth as I am sure you are aware. We arew being made holy in expewrience to ultimately match what God has declared us to be.

 

Hebrews 10 because of the present passive participle construct of sanctified is beter read----He has perfected forever those that are being sanctified.

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nolidad

Hello @NetChaplain, what do you think of Hebrews 10:14, which the ESV renders as "For by a single offering he has perfected for all time those who are being sanctified." Being sanctified, rather than been sanctified makes it sound like an ongoing process to me.

 

The other comment I would make is that I hope it is a process, since if I live much longer and see no further improvement in my current state of holiness it will not be a good thing!

 

Hi Eric, and appreciate your input and comment! Just wanted to mention that the meaning of "are being sanctified" is often misunderstood to be in reference to those presently saved, which is incorrect, for it is in reference to future souls who will also be "sanctified." Just as we are made holy and righteous, which never needs repeated, the same is for sanctification, redemption, justification, etc. It's only our walk and our faith that will never be complete in this life, due to the "old man," but the believer himself (spirit and soul) is "perfected" at rebirth in Christ. No human could be in union with the Lord Jesus apart from His perfect sanctification (Heb 2:11).

 

Ellicott:

“Are sanctified”; No repetition of His offering is needed, for by one offering He hath brought all unto “perfection,” and that “forever.” In Hebrews 7:11 we have read that “perfection” did not come through the Levitical priesthood or through the law (Hebrews 10:19); the object of man’s hopes and of all priestly service has at last been attained, since through the “great High Priest” “we draw nigh to God” (Hebrews 7:19). In this is involved salvation to the uttermost (Hebrews 7:25). The last word of this verse has occurred before, in Hebrews 2:11. As was there explained, it literally means those who are being sanctified, all those who, from age to age, through faith (Hebrews 10:22) receive as their own that which has been procured for all men.

 

Adam Clark:

“Them that are sanctified” - Τους ἁγιαζομενους· Them that have received the sprinkling of the blood of this offering. These, therefore, receiving redemption through that blood, have no need of any other offering; as this was a complete atonement, purification, and title to eternal glory.

 

John Gill:

“He hath perfected forever them that are sanctified”; that is, who are sanctified by God the Father, Judges 1:1 or, who are set apart by him in eternal election, from the rest of the world, for his own use, service, and glory, to a state of grace and holiness here, and happiness hereafter; for this is not to be understood either of their being sanctified in Christ, though the Syriac version reads, "that are sanctified" in him, or by his Spirit, though both are true of the same persons.”

 

 

 

The literal rendering is as the KJV has it: Young's Literal Translation--"for by one offering he hath perfected to the end those sanctified."

Well not wanting to insult men of God gone by, but I must.

 

Hebrews 10:14 is not describing 2 differing classes of saints but describing teh work going on in each individual.

 

Heb 10:14

 

For by one offering he hath perfected for ever them that are sanctified. This does not lend itself to talking about 2 different peoples.

 

Those who are already complete (perfected) are those who are being sanctified.In your circles of fellowship I do not know what it is called, but for me we call this sentence an example of positional truth and experiential truth!

 

God views us as complete- now the work of the spirit is to make us what God sees us as!

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NetChaplain

I appreciate the good input from all who have been replying to this thread, and I think it all mostly right, but just want to add what I think is a major issue with the subject of "sanctified." Whether one sees it as a certain present work or a continued work, those who are in Christ have been placed perfect in God by His Cross-work and nothing can or needs added to this perfection we have in Him. 

 

The rest which is involved in the life of believers in no way address or effects this eternal position, thus all else has to do with our witness via our walk and works, which never produces any additions to our redemption (we can only please Him more because we couldn't be more favored in Christ), only to our outward examples of the Lord Jesus for the sake of outreach to others.

 

Christ's blessings to all in Him!

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Matto

I'm looking at this with the idea that Christ drew all men to Himself on the Cross. In His Divinity He lived all men's lives perfectly from Adam to the last man before The Father, in this way He paid the ransom for all.

Christ took all the sins of the world because He lived all the lives of the world and lived the perfect version of them. Our lives are not our own, they were bought for a price. 

In being a member of Christ's Body the Church, The Father doesn't see the sinner, He sees Jesus.

Only the Divine Jesus could have done this, all we have to do is accept the salvation that comes from Christ's atonement of our sinful lives, because only in Jesus is salvation.

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reformed baptist
43 minutes ago, Matto said:

I'm looking at this with the idea that Christ drew all men to Himself on the Cross. In His Divinity He lived all men's lives perfectly from Adam to the last man before The Father, in this way He paid the ransom for all.

Are you a universalist, or would you say that Christ ransom is wasted on certain people who do not "accept 'the salvation that comes from Christ's atonement" ?

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Matto
19 hours ago, reformed baptist said:

Are you a universalist, or would you say that Christ ransom is wasted on certain people who do not "accept 'the salvation that comes from Christ's atonement" ?

 

Christ redeemed all men but not all accept it. The ransom was paid, but the hostage must choose to leave the prison.

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reformed baptist
2 hours ago, Matto said:

 

Christ redeemed all men but not all accept it. The ransom was paid, but the hostage must choose to leave the prison.

So what happens to the payment made for those who choose not to leave the prison - is that portion of it wasted?

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Matto
1 hour ago, reformed baptist said:

So what happens to the payment made for those who choose not to leave the prison - is that portion of it wasted?

 

That portion Jesus drank in Gethsemene, the anguish of His rejected love and sacrifice being thrown back at Him made Him sorrowful beyond our understanding.

Jesus suffered so terribly because of this, because He is great Love, and great Love rejected causes great suffering.

Like a loving Father alienated from his children, He calls them by name and the children throw back his gifts and every expression of love.

Its a sorrow that makes one shudder, choke in grief and want to die.

"My soul is sorrowful, even unto death"

 

To understand a little of Jesus great Love, understand in some small way His great sorrow.

This suffering was worse than all the physical pain Jesus  suffered, these were nothing by comparison.

 

Jesus was more innocent than any child, loving and good beyond any of our definitions, He wanted none to be lost, so this bitter cup He did not want to accept, but drank it in horror in obedience to the Father.

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reformed baptist
2 minutes ago, Matto said:

 

That portion Jesus drank in Gethsemene, the anguish of His rejected love and sacrifice being thrown back at Him made Him sorrowful beyond our understanding.

Jesus suffered so terribly because of this, because He is great Love, and great Love rejected causes great suffering.

Like a loving Father alienated from his children, He calls them by name and the children throw back his gifts and every expression of love.

Its a sorrow that makes one shudder, choke in grief and want to die.

That isn't an answer to my question friend - but I'm not going to pursue it further. 

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NetChaplain
On 2/15/2018 at 8:22 AM, nolidad said:

Hi Net chaplain. Hebrews 10:14 is a good example. For believers there is what is called positional truth and experiential truth as I am sure you are aware. We arew being made holy in expewrience to ultimately match what God has declared us to be.

 

Hebrews 10 because of the present passive participle construct of sanctified is beter read----He has perfected forever those that are being sanctified.

Hi Nolidad, and appreciate your replies! Wanted to point out the only place in the literal and many other translations that the phrase "being sanctified" is used is Rom 15:16 ("that the offering up of the Gentiles might be acceptable, being sanctified by the Holy Ghost"); and this is just denoting a present tense of condition, i.e. "since they are sanctified by the Holy Ghost."

 

The most consistent reading reading is "are sanctified," which parallels the usages of the word "sanctified" in the NT intending present tense. 

 

Young's Literal Translation: "he hath perfected to the end those sanctified;

Webster: "he hath perfected for ever them that are sanctified."

KJV: "he hath perfected for ever them that are sanctified."

Darby: "he has perfected in perpetuity the sanctified."

 

I think many confuse sanctification with the progressive conformation of the believer's walk and not the stat and condition of the soul, which is the same for holiness, righteousness, justification, all are conditions of the believer at rebirth and never admit in degree (exists only in one degree, i.e nobody is holier, justified, sanctified or righteous than any other believer.

 

But our faith admits in degrees because we are all at varying strengths of faith, which is commensurate with our understanding and applications of God's word as taught by His Spirit to each according to our level of maturity in our Christian walk in Christ's image.

 

Blessings!

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