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John Calvin puts forward a very simple reason why love is the greatest gift: “Because faith and hope are our own: love is diffused among others.” In other words, faith and hope benefit the possessor, but love always benefits another. In John 13:34–35 Jesus says, “A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.” Love always requires an “other” as an object; love cannot remain within itself, and that is part of what makes love the greatest gift.
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What is forgiveness and who benefits by it being bestowed?

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Forgiveness is to stop anger at a person for an offense they have committed. Christians are to be quick to forgive the offenses of others. If someone genuinely apologizes for an offense, forgiveness should be granted. You can still hate the sin or offense they committed but stop being angry at the individual. We are all sinners and we all make mistakes so we need forgiveness from God and others as well.

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Forgiveness is an offence or wrong that is no longer held against the one forgiven. You already know that forgiveness from Christ is unimaginable benefit, it's eternal life and it's not face the judgment and punishment of our migthy God. Forgiveness from other people benefits our conisience and gives us a clear way to communicate with them again. To forgiv other as Christ commands us has reward in heaven and as Scripture tells us it's to a mans honour to forgive an offence. Unforginess enslaves us to those who have done us wrong, it let's that person make us angery and miserable via your focus in your mind.

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When God forgives someone the person forgiven benefits because he no longer has to face judgment and punishment for his sins. When one person forgives another the main beneficiary is the one who forgives. If he was planning to sue the other person or take some kind of action against him the one being forgiven will also benefit.

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Forgiveness, from God's point of view (and in my opinion as I obviously cannot explain the one who is infinite) is:

Reconciliation: removal of enmity between God and the elect

 

Propitiation: the appeasement of God's demand for righteousness

 

----------------------------------

I have a question about "FORGIVENESS" ... (verses not necessarily proof texts)

Let's use a person, Billy Graham, as an example and assume he is among the elect (seems a safe selection)

At what point in time are/were/will the sins of Billy Graham forgiven:

1) In Eternity past ALL Billy's sins were forgiven as he was among the elect ? (Ephesians 1:4)

2a) At that point in time at which Billy was regenerated? (Matthew 6:12)

2b) (assumes 2a is correct) At the time of Billy's regeneration

i) have all Billy's future sins been forgiven or

ii) his future sins are forgiven as he commits them or

iii) his future sins require his confession to actuate forgiveness ( 1 John 1:9 union vs. communion)

 

If all future sins have been forgiven, why would one ask for forgiveness; ask in effect for something already granted? I am not saying that one should not confess/acknowledge sins to God; rather, and if future sin have been forgiven then it seems a technical error to ask for something you already have. (example: I don't perpetually ask for regeneration (slang: Jesus come into my heart)).

 

Sorry for miscellaneous ramblings. I have an answer, but maybe someone can change my mind.

Aside: When I was young and silly (now I am old and silly) I used to worry about dying and having sin for which I had not asked for forgiveness. My solution was to hope I would have the opportunity to say one last prayer for forgiveness to clean the slate. (Again, I was young ... was my best solution at the time.)

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Forgiveness, from God's point of view (and in my opinion as I obviously cannot explain the one who is infinite) is:

Reconciliation: removal of enmity between God and the elect

 

Propitiation: the appeasement of God's demand for righteousness

 

----------------------------------

I have a question about "FORGIVENESS" ... (verses not necessarily proof texts)

Let's use a person, Billy Graham, as an example and assume he is among the elect (seems a safe selection)

At what point in time are/were/will the sins of Billy Graham forgiven:

1) In Eternity past ALL Billy's sins were forgiven as he was among the elect ? (Ephesians 1:4)

2a) At that point in time at which Billy was regenerated? (Matthew 6:12)

2b) (assumes 2a is correct) At the time of Billy's regeneration

i) have all Billy's future sins been forgiven or

ii) his future sins are forgiven as he commits them or

iii) his future sins require his confession to actuate forgiveness ( 1 John 1:9 union vs. communion)

 

If all future sins have been forgiven, why would one ask for forgiveness; ask in effect for something already granted? I am not saying that one should not confess/acknowledge sins to God; rather, and if future sin have been forgiven then it seems a technical error to ask for something you already have. (example: I don't perpetually ask for regeneration (slang: Jesus come into my heart)).

 

Sorry for miscellaneous ramblings. I have an answer, but maybe someone can change my mind.

Aside: When I was young and silly (now I am old and silly) I used to worry about dying and having sin for which I had not asked for forgiveness. My solution was to hope I would have the opportunity to say one last prayer for forgiveness to clean the slate. (Again, I was young ... was my best solution at the time.)

 

Great questions.

 

We are to genuinely ask for forgiveness to acknowledge our wrong before God and then not commit that sin any longer. If we mess up again, we are to acknowledge that sin and genuinely ask forgiveness again. Just because future sins may be forgiven, we are not to take forgiveness for granted and this shows it. Same is true in every relationship. For example, we may know that our wife will forgive us for arguing with her but if we are in the wrong and know it, we should genuinely apologize and try not to make the same mistake again in the future.

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I see forgiveness as an acknowledgement that I am just as guilty as anyone else, and since God has bestowed on me the great gift of forgiveness, I should do the same to those who have done me wrong. I like reading the parable in Matt. 18:21-35. It points out how the servant owed a massive debt of 10,000 talents to the king and he forgave him, but a fellowservant only owed the servant 100 pence, but he threw him into prison; and God has forgiven us an eternal debt, yet we somehow think we are justified to hold any amount of debt against someone that has done us wrong. We must be willing to ask Christ to give us forgiveness for others as often as needed in order to lessen, and eventually do away with, the anger/hatred/bitterness we have toward others. If we are not willing to surrender the sin of unforgiveness, "neither will [our] Father which is in heaven forgive [our] trespasses" Mark 11:26, because God will never force us to give up some cherished sin. And that has eternal consequences. Let us remember the weight of debt that Christ has paid for us and dwell on the richness of His love toward us, and be willing to extend the same grace to be like Him in all things (Phil. 2:1-11). God bless!

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I see forgiveness as an acknowledgement that I am just as guilty as anyone else, and since God has bestowed on me the great gift of forgiveness, I should do the same to those who have done me wrong. I like reading the parable in Matt. 18:21-35. It points out how the servant owed a massive debt of 10,000 talents to the king and he forgave him, but a fellowservant only owed the servant 100 pence, but he threw him into prison; and God has forgiven us an eternal debt, yet we somehow think we are justified to hold any amount of debt against someone that has done us wrong. We must be willing to ask Christ to give us forgiveness for others as often as needed in order to lessen, and eventually do away with, the anger/hatred/bitterness we have toward others. If we are not willing to surrender the sin of unforgiveness, "neither will [our] Father which is in heaven forgive [our] trespasses" Mark 11:26, because God will never force us to give up some cherished sin. And that has eternal consequences. Let us remember the weight of debt that Christ has paid for us and dwell on the richness of His love toward us, and be willing to extend the same grace to be like Him in all things (Phil. 2:1-11). God bless!

 

Thank you, Thank you.:RpS_thumbsup:

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I see forgiveness as an acknowledgement that I am just as guilty as anyone else, and since God has bestowed on me the great gift of forgiveness, I should do the same to those who have done me wrong. I like reading the parable in Matt. 18:21-35. It points out how the servant owed a massive debt of 10,000 talents to the king and he forgave him, but a fellowservant only owed the servant 100 pence, but he threw him into prison; and God has forgiven us an eternal debt, yet we somehow think we are justified to hold any amount of debt against someone that has done us wrong. We must be willing to ask Christ to give us forgiveness for others as often as needed in order to lessen, and eventually do away with, the anger/hatred/bitterness we have toward others. If we are not willing to surrender the sin of unforgiveness, "neither will [our] Father which is in heaven forgive [our] trespasses" Mark 11:26, because God will never force us to give up some cherished sin. And that has eternal consequences. Let us remember the weight of debt that Christ has paid for us and dwell on the richness of His love toward us, and be willing to extend the same grace to be like Him in all things (Phil. 2:1-11). God bless!

 

Great post.

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