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theophilus

Good Wednesday

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Two days before Easter we observe Good Friday as the day on which Jesus was crucified. For anyone who is familiar with Jesus’ predictions about his death and resurrection this raises a problem. He said that just as Jonah was in the belly of the fish three days and three nights he would be in the earth three days and three nights. But how could this be if he was crucified on Friday and resurrected on Sunday? Friday, Saturday, and Sunday make up three days but there are only two nights.

 

The Bible says that the women who discovered that his tomb was empty came early on the first day of the week, which in the Jewish calendar was Sunday, so there is no doubt about which day the resurrection took place.

 

But was the crucifixion really on Friday? The Bible says it took place on the day before the Sabbath, and since Saturday is the Sabbath it would seem that it must have been on a Friday. But John 19:31 says,

 

That Sabbath was a high day.

 

Does this mean that it wasn’t the regular weekly Sabbath?

 

The Sabbath was a day in which work was prohibited. Leviticus 23 shows that there was more than one kind of Sabbath. Verse three says that the seventh day of every week was a Sabbath.

 

Six days shall work be done, but on the seventh day is a Sabbath of solemn rest, a holy convocation. You shall do no work. It is a Sabbath to the LORD in all your dwelling places.

 

But the rest of the chapter describes annual feasts that the Israelites were to observe and they included days in which work was forbidden. These Sabbaths were to be observed on a specific day of the month so they could fall on any day of the week.

 

Jesus was crucified on Passover, which was the 14th day of the first month. Leviticus 23:5-7 shows that Passover was followed immediately by the seven day Feast of Unleavened Bread and the first day of this feast, which was the day after Passover, was day in which work was forbidden.

 

In the first month, on the fourteenth day of the month at twilight, is the LORD’s Passover. And on the fifteenth day of the same month is the Feast of Unleavened Bread to the LORD; for seven days you shall eat unleavened bread. On the first day you shall have a holy convocation; you shall not do any ordinary work.

 

Since this day was on the 15th day of the month it could fall on any day of the week.

 

On what day of the week must Jesus have been crucified if he was to stay buried for three days and three nights? He was taken down from the cross and buried just before sunset, which the Jews considered the start of the new day. If the crucifixion was on a Wednesday then he would have been buried all of Thursday, the Sabbath which was the first day of the Feast of Unleavened Bread; Friday, which was a regular work day; and Saturday, the regular weekly Sabbath. His resurrection occurred just after sunset on Saturday, when the first day of the week began, and the women came to the tomb the next morning and found it empty. It is commonly believed that Jesus rose on Sunday morning but actually that is when the women discovered that his tomb was empty.

 

Luke 23:54-56 shows clearly that this was what happened.

 

It was the day of Preparation, and the Sabbath was beginning. The women who had come with him from Galilee followed and say the tomb and how his body was laid. Then they returned and prepared spices and ointment. On the Sabbath day they rested according to the commandment.

 

The women saw Jesus buried as the Sabbath was beginning, prepared spices and ointment to anoint his body, and then rested on the Sabbath. These must have been two different Sabbath, because they wouldn’t have had time to prepare the spices on the same day as the burial. On Friday they prepared the spices but couldn’t put them on Jesus’ body that day because the tomb was being guarded by Roman soldiers.

 

The practice of observing Good Friday arose because the belief arose that the Sabbath after the crucifixion and the Sabbath before the resurrection were the same day. If people understood the Bible better we would probably observe Good Wednesday instead.

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theophilus,

re: "If people understood the Bible better we would probably observe Good Wednesday instead."

 

 

How do you reconcile a 4th day of the week crucifixion/1st day of the week resurrection with Luke 24:21?

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How do you reconcile a 4th day of the week crucifixion/1st day of the week resurrection with Luke 24:21?

 

A 4th day crucifixion and 3 days burial would mean the resurrection was on the 7th day. He was buried at sunset just as the 4th day was ending; he rose on the 7th day at sunset just as the day was ending. It was on the 1st day that the fact of his resurrection was discovered. I don't know how this can be reconciled with the scripture you referred to.

 

 

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theophilus,

re: "

I don't know how this can be reconciled with the scripture you referred to."

 

Neither do I.

 

 

 

Hi rstrats and theophilus,

 

I guess no one reads my posts anymore. I just happen to have found an old post in a MS/Word Doc.:

 

Maybe this will answer this question: Jesus was crucified on a Wednesday. The Romans said it was Friday because of the sundown Sabbath was approaching. But it says in John 19:14 it was the preparation day (crucifixion day) which is the day before the annual Sabbath of the First Day of Unleavened Bread. Ask any Jew what the preparation day is. Three days and three nights raises Him on Saturday evening. He had already risen by early Sunday (John 20:1).

 

Jesus was talking with Mary saying he had not ascended to His Father yet: John 20:16,17: “Jesus saith unto her, Mary. She turned herself, and saith unto him, Rabboni; which is to say, Master. Jesus saith unto her, touch me not; for I am not yet ascended to my Father: but go to my brethren, and say unto them, I ascend unto my Father, and your Father; and to my God, and your God.”

 

Later that same day He appeared to His disciples and they could touch Him. So we can say for sure the ascension was on Sunday. We are given a picture of His ascension as the wave sheath day, when the first fruits were waved before God as a tribute. This was always done on the first Sunday after Passover. [look up wave sheath day for yourself] This still does not make Sunday the Sabbath.

 

You argue the resurrection was on a Sunday, but it was actually on a Saturday evening. Christ was buried just before sundown: and 3 days/3 nights add up to a sundown resurrection. I am a Christian author/missionary that keeps the Saturday Sabbath. I am not a SDA as I don't agree with any of Ellen White's writings.

 

If your worship God through Christ, that is enough but do not judge me for keeping the true Sabbath and I won't judge you.

 

Yours,

 

Deade

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Thank you for poking me on this ... it made me go and look for myself.

 

The THIRD Day ...

 

Matthew 16:21 NASB From that time Jesus began to show His disciples that He must go to Jerusalem, and suffer many things from the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be killed, and be raised up on the third day.

Matthew 17:23 NASB and they will kill Him, and He will be raised on the thirdday.” And they were deeply grieved.

Matthew 20:19 NASB and will hand Him over to the Gentiles to mock and scourge and crucify Him, and on the thirdday He will be raised up.”

Luke 9:22 NASB saying, “The Son of Man must suffer many things and be rejected by the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be killed and be raised up on the third day.”

Luke 18:33 NASB and after they have scourged Him, they will kill Him; and the third day He will rise again.”

Luke 24:7 NASB saying that the Son of Man must be delivered into the hands of sinful men, and be crucified, and the third day rise again.”

Luke 24:21 NASB “But we were hoping that it was He who was going to redeem Israel. Indeed, besides all this, it is the third day since these things happened.

Luke 24:46 NASB and He said to them, “Thus it is written, that the Christ would suffer and rise again from the dead the third day,

Acts 10:40 NASB “God raised Him up on the third day and granted that He become visible,

1 Corinthians 15:4 NASB and that He was buried, and that He was raised on the third day according to the Scriptures,

 

 

THREE Days ...

 

Matthew 12:40 NASB for just as JONAH WAS THREE DAYS AND THREE NIGHTS IN THE BELLY OF THE SEA MONSTER, so will the Son of Man be three days and three nights in the heart of the earth.

Matthew 26:61 NASB and said, “This man stated, ‘I am able to destroy the temple of God and to rebuild it in three days.'”

Matthew 27:40 NASB and saying, “You who are going to destroy the temple and rebuild it in three days, save Yourself! If You are the Son of God, come down from the cross.”

Matthew 27:63 NASB and said, “Sir, we remember that when He was still alive that deceiver said, ‘After three days I am to rise again.'

Mark 8:31 NASB And He began to teach them that the Son of Man must suffer many things and be rejected by the elders and the chief priests and the scribes, and be killed, and after three days rise again.

Mark 9:31 NASB For He was teaching His disciples and telling them, “The Son of Man is to be delivered into the hands of men, and they will kill Him; and when He has been killed, He will rise three days later.”

Mark 10:34 NASB “They will mock Him and spit on Him, and scourge Him and kill Him, and three days later He will rise again.”

Mark 14:58 NASB “We heard Him say, ‘I will destroy this temple made with hands, and in three days I will build another made without hands.'”

Mark 15:29 NASB Those passing by were hurling abuse at Him, wagging their heads, and saying, “Ha! You who are going to destroy the temple and rebuild it in three days,

John 2:19-20 NASB Jesus answered them, “Destroy this temple, and in three days I will raise it up.” The Jews then said, “It took forty-six years to build this temple, and will You raise it up in three days?”

 

 

So what do we have? Only one verse (Matthew 12:40) mentions 3 days and 3 nights and it is a slightly symbolic reference ... being both tied to Jonah and in the "heart of the earth" which could mean buried, or simply dead ... or 'three days and three nights' could be a symbolic phrase, rather than a literal claim to 72 hours. However it could also be a literal claim to 72 hours (either dead or in the tomb).

 

What we have in abundant clarity is that "three days later" (Mark 9:31) is also "on the third day" (Matthew 17:23 & Acts 10:40).

I am now more than a bit uncomfortable bending so many scriptures to fit just one reference to the word "and nights".

I do not have an answer, but it is an area that I will tread with caution.

 

 

 

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atpollard,

re: "So what do we have? Only one verse (Matthew 12:40) mentions 3 days and 3 nights and it is a slightly symbolic reference ... being both tied to Jonah and in the 'heart of the earth' which could mean buried, or simply dead..."

 

It wouldn't matter since either condition would have occurred during the same daytime.

 

 

 

re: " I am now more than a bit uncomfortable bending so many scriptures to fit just one reference to the word 'and nights'".

 

I'm not aware of any scriptures that need "bending" to arrive at a 3rd night. What do you have in mind?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by rstrats

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I'm not aware of any scriptures that need "bending" to arrive at a 3rd night. What do you have in mind?

I'm just looking to stick with the traditional "Jesus died on Good Friday and was raised on Easter Sunday", rather than begin with the assumption that the Early Church Fathers just didn't understand Passover or Jewish timekeeping. Friday, Saturday, Sunday is "three days" and Sunday could be viewed as the third day. It was not "three days and three nights". So I will stick with the many verses and the traditional belief rather than reinterpret all those verses to accommodate "three days and three nights" and assume that the Early church never knew what day Jesus died on or anything about Jewish Passovers.

 

I am open to being proven wrong, and I have heard a lot of interesting theories, but the burden of proof is on the non-traditional view and "three days and three nights" is not enough to convince me.

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German- English :Sunday meaning literally: 'washing day'

 

Latin -Dominica meaning: 'of the Lord'

 

Hebrew- Yom Reeshone :' first day'

Sounds like the washing of the Lord gives all their first day of LIFE! Born Again! Easter Sunday! I call that a 'God Winks Moment:RpS_wink:'

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I'm amazed that this comes up every Easter time, and people continue to get so hung up on the 'sign of Jonah' and ignore the basic biblical principle of using the clear texts to understand the less clear ones.

 

Jesus Christ said he would rise again on the third day - eg. Matt 16:21

 

On the road to Emmaus those travelling report it was the third day, Luke 24:21 to which Jesus again responds that 'it is written that he would rise the third day' Luke 24:46

 

And this is the testimony of the apostles - Acts 10:40: 27:19 & 1 Cor 15:4

 

And we now the woman came on Sunday (after dawn) and found the tomb empty - so it is very simple to work it backwards:

 

Sunday - third day (day of resurrection)

Saturday - second day

Friday - first day

 

If we place the year of Jesus death as ad33 (as the early church obviously did to give us 0AD) we find that Passover occurred on the normal Sabbath Saturday and so preparation day, was a for a high sabbath that year - hence John was correct when he said Jesus was Crucified on a Friday (preparation day)

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A need for a sign is need for proof to be believe. Are we speaking amongst believers in Christ or sign seekers? I simply believe in the Omniscient God "the story is told by an omniscient narrator".

It is His story and all things which are, is because of Him even the days of the week. It is called sense of humor. I see "God Winks" moments as His sense of humor. And as far as I can see, I have not met anyone here fishing for signs.

Have you tried to judge my heart? Are you bearing false witness against your neighbor?

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James4:11-12

Drawing Near to God

…11Brothers, do not slander one another. Anyone who speaks against his brother or judges him speaks against the Law and judges it. And if you judge the Law, you are not a practitioner of the Law, but a judge of it. 12There is only one Lawgiver and Judge, the One who is able to save and destroy. But who are you to judge your neighbor?

 

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reformed baptist,

re: "Jesus Christ said he would rise again on the third day - eg. Matt 16:21"

 

Which is more specific - on the third day or three days and three nights?

Which is more specific - on the third day or after three days?

Which is more specific - on the third day or "this is the third day since these things happened"?

 

 

re: "Sunday - third day (day of resurrection)"

"Saturday - second day"

"Friday - first day"

 

How do you account for the lack of the prophesied 3rd night?

 

 

 

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I'm amazed that this comes up every Easter time, and people continue to get so hung up on the 'sign of Jonah' and ignore the basic biblical principle of using the clear texts to understand the less clear ones.

 

Jesus Christ said he would rise again on the third day - eg. Matt 16:21

 

On the road to Emmaus those travelling report it was the third day, Luke 24:21 to which Jesus again responds that 'it is written that he would rise the third day' Luke 24:46

 

And this is the testimony of the apostles - Acts 10:40: 27:19 & 1 Cor 15:4

 

And we now the woman came on Sunday (after dawn) and found the tomb empty - so it is very simple to work it backwards:

 

Sunday - third day (day of resurrection)

Saturday - second day

Friday - first day

 

If we place the year of Jesus death as ad33 (as the early church obviously did to give us 0AD) we find that Passover occurred on the normal Sabbath Saturday and so preparation day, was a for a high sabbath that year - hence John was correct when he said Jesus was Crucified on a Friday (preparation day) [/quote

Ok?

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reformed baptist,

re: "Jesus Christ said he would rise again on the third day - eg. Matt 16:21"

 

Which is more specific - on the third day or three days and three nights?

Which is more specific - on the third day or after three days?

Which is more specific - on the third day or "this is the third day since these things happened"?

 

 

 

re: "Sunday - third day (day of resurrection)"

"Saturday - second day"

"Friday - first day"

 

How do account for the lack of the prophesied 3rd night?

 

 

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My friend, if you use the quote system it is much easier for me to find things that I need to respond to :RpS_thumbup:

 

reformed baptist,

re: "Jesus Christ said he would rise again on the third day - eg. Matt 16:21"

 

Which is more specific - on the third day or three days and three nights?

Which is more specific - on the third day or after three days?

Which is more specific - on the third day or "this is the third day since these things happened"?

 

 

re: "Sunday - third day (day of resurrection)"

"Saturday - second day"

"Friday - first day"

 

How do you account for the lack of the prophesied 3rd night?

 

 

 

Can I address your question from three different directions please:

 

1) We can turn the question around, how do you account for the clear (and far more frequent) references to a third day resurrection if you insist on having 3 days and 3 nights in the tomb/ dead - that would make the resurrection after the third day would it not?

 

That is to say that those who argue for 3 days and 3 nights and therefore a Thursday or Wednesday Crucifixion (depending how they calculate it) have exactly the same question to answer - but in my opinion less grounds for a satisfactory answer to the question, and in all honestly unless that question has been answered your demanding a level of evidence from me that your willing to supply yourself :RpS_biggrin:

 

2) Where does Jesus Christ ever say Jonah was in the belly of the fish for 3 whole nights and 3 whole days? In fact where in the bible are we told exactly what 3 days and 3 nights means. Now, certainly we can insist on interpreting that according to our modern, western time obsessed culture or we can recognize that in most subsistence cultures precise measuring of time is simply not a thing.

 

3) We have a biblical example in the life of Esther were she asked for prayer and fasting for 'three days, night and day' Est 4:16 and yet Eshter goes to see the king on the third day Est 5:1 - It's a striking similarity and there is no reason for this detail to be put in scripture other then to help us understand how the sign of Jonah can be reconciled to the clear and repeated testimony that the resurrection happened on the third day.

 

Now, having addressed your question, can you answer mine?

 

i) How do you reconcile 'three days and three nights' and 'third day'?

 

ii) Bearing in mind the church has always understood the execution of Jesus to happen on a Friday, and therefore the burden of proof lies with those disputing what - what concrete evidence can be put forward to support it?

 

iii) When we learn from the works of Josephus that παρασκευή is the greek term used by Jewish writers to designate a specific day of the week, ie Friday - on what grounds do we overturn common usage of a term?

 

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I'm amazed that this comes up every Easter time, and people continue to get so hung up on the 'sign of Jonah' and ignore the basic biblical principle of using the clear texts to understand the less clear ones.

 

Jesus Christ said he would rise again on the third day - eg. Matt 16:21

 

On the road to Emmaus those travelling report it was the third day, Luke 24:21 to which Jesus again responds that 'it is written that he would rise the third day' Luke 24:46

 

And this is the testimony of the apostles - Acts 10:40: 27:19 & 1 Cor 15:4

 

And we now the woman came on Sunday (after dawn) and found the tomb empty - so it is very simple to work it backwards:

 

Sunday - third day (day of resurrection)

Saturday - second day

Friday - first day

 

If we place the year of Jesus death as ad33 (as the early church obviously did to give us 0AD) we find that Passover occurred on the normal Sabbath Saturday and so preparation day, was a for a high sabbath that year - hence John was correct when he said Jesus was Crucified on a Friday (preparation day)

Ok?

 

eh?

 

 

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reformed baptist,

re: "...John was correct when he said Jesus was Crucified on a Friday..."

 

 

That is not what the writer of John wrote - at least not in the KJV.

 

 

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Once again, if you want posts answered please use the quote function - it makes it much easier for people to see they have been replied to - and it makes it so much easier for others to follow the line of reasoning - it just seems like common courtesy to me

 

reformed baptist,

re: "...John was correct when he said Jesus was Crucified on a Friday..."

 

That is not what the writer of John wrote - at least not in the KJV.

 

 

John didn't write the AV, he wrote the original autograph and to the best of our knowledge he used the word παρασκευή - now if you have evidence to the contrary please provide it (I have enough of a familiarity with textual criticism to follow the argument). Also if you had read my last post to you you would have noticed that I expand upon why I said what I said in my third question to you :RpS_thumbsup:

 

So having addressed all your questions - will you do me the same courtesy please before asking me anymore

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Rather than argue in vauge 'John wrote', take your pick of John 19:31 translations...

KJV

The Jews therefore, because it was the preparation[G3904], that the bodies should not remain upon the cross on the sabbath day, (for that sabbath day was an high day,) besought Pilate that their legs might be broken, and that they might be taken away.

 

NKJV

Therefore, because it was the Preparation Day, that the bodies should not remain on the cross on the Sabbath (for that Sabbath was a high day), the Jews asked Pilate that their legs might be broken, and that they might be taken away.

 

NLT

It was the day of preparation, and the Jewish leaders didn’t want the bodies hanging there the next day, which was the Sabbath (and a very special Sabbath, because it was the Passover). So they asked Pilate to hasten their deaths by ordering that their legs be broken. Then their bodies could be taken down.

 

NIV

Now it was the day of Preparation, and the next day was to be a special Sabbath. Because the Jewish leaders did not want the bodies left on the crosses during the Sabbath, they asked Pilate to have the legs broken and the bodies taken down.

 

ESV

Since it was the day of Preparation, and so that the bodies would not remain on the cross on the Sabbath (for that Sabbath was a high day), the Jews asked Pilate that their legs might be broken and that they might be taken away.

 

NASB

Then the Jews, because it was the day of preparation[G3904], so that the bodies would not remain on the cross on the Sabbath ([fn]for that Sabbath was a high day), asked Pilate that their legs might be broken, and that they might be taken away.

 

RSV

Since it was the day of Preparation, in order to prevent the bodies from remaining on the cross on the sabbath (for that sabbath was a high day), the Jews asked Pilate that their legs might be broken, and that they might be taken away.

 

ASV

The Jews therefore, because it was the Preparation, that the bodies should not remain on the cross upon the sabbath (for the day of that sabbath was a high day), asked of Pilate that their legs might be broken, and that they might be taken away.

 

YLT

The Jews, therefore, that the bodies might not remain on the cross on the sabbath, since it was the preparation, (for that sabbath day was a great one,) asked of Pilate that their legs may be broken, and they taken away.

 

DBY

The Jews therefore, that the bodies might not remain on the cross on the sabbath, for it was the preparation, (for the day of that sabbath was a great day,) demanded of Pilate that their legs might be broken and they taken away.

 

VUL

Iudaei ergo quoniam parasceve erat ut non remanerent in cruce corpora sabbato erat enim magnus dies ille sabbati rogaverunt Pilatum ut frangerentur eorum crura et tollerentur

 

MGNT

οἱ οὖν Ἰουδαῖοι ἐπεὶ παρασκευὴ ἦν ἵνα μὴ μείνῃ ἐπὶ τοῦ σταυροῦ τὰ σώματα ἐν τῷ σαββάτῳ ἦν γὰρ μεγάλη ἡ ἡμέρα ἐκείνου τοῦ σαββάτου ἠρώτησαν τὸν Πιλᾶτον ἵνα κατεαγῶσιν αὐτῶν τὰ σκέλη καὶ ἀρθῶσιν

 

 

 

 

Thayer's Greek Lexicon

STRONGS NT 3904: παρασκευή

παρασκευή, παρασκευῆς, ἡ, from Herodotus down;

1. a making ready, preparation, equipping.

2. that which is prepared, equipment.

3. in the N. T. in a Jewish sense, the day of preparation, i. e. the day on which the Jews made the necessary preparation to celebrate a sabbath or a feast: Matthew 27:62; Mark 15:42; Luke 23:54; John 19:31 (Josephus, Antiquities 16, 6, 2); with a genitive of the object, τοῦ πάσχα (according to Winer's Grammar, 189 (177f) a possessive genitive), John 19:14 (cf. Rückert, Abendmahl, p. 31f); with a genitive of the subjunctive, τῶν Ἰουδαίων, ibid. 42. Cf. Bleek, Beiträge zur Evangelienkritik, p. 114ff; (on later usage cf. 'Teaching 8, 1 [ET] (and Harnack's note); Martyr. Polycarp, 7, 1 [ET] (and Zahn's note); Sophocles' Lexicon, under the word, 3).

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reformed baptist,

re: "...how do you account for the clear (and far more frequent) references to a third day resurrection if you insist on having 3 days and 3 nights in the tomb/ dead - that would make the resurrection after the third day would it not?"

 

Indeed it would. And this is in line with Matthew 12:40, Mark 8:31, and Luke 24:21 which I asked you about in post #16.

 

 

 

 

re: "Where does Jesus Christ ever say Jonah was in the belly of the fish for 3 whole nights and 3 whole days?"

 

He doesn't. However, He does say that "... Jonah was three days and three nights in the belly of the great fish..."

 

 

 

 

re: "In fact where in the bible are we told exactly what 3 days and 3 nights means."

 

I don't think it's spelled out. But what in scripture makes it absolutely, no question about it, necessary to think that it doesn't mean that at least a portion of three daytimes and at least a portion of 3 night times is involved?

 

 

 

 

 

re: "We have a biblical example in the life of Esther..."

 

The Esther account is not an appropriate example because nothing in the account precludes at least a portion of three daytimes and at least a portion of three night times.

 

 

 

 

 

re: "How do you reconcile 'three days and three nights' and 'third day'?"

 

1. Matthew 12:40 has the Messiah saying that three days and three nights would be involved with His time in the "heart of the earth". The following comment is predicated on the belief that "the heart of the earth" is referring to the tomb or at the earliest to the time when His spirit left His body around the ninth hour. Now in order to have at least a part of each one of three daytimes and at least a part of each one of three night times, four calendar days would have to be involved.

 

2. Mark 8:31 has the Messiah saying that He would rise after 3 days. So 4 calendar days had to have been involved.

 

3. Luke 24:21 has the men on the road to Emmaus saying that the 1st day of the week "is the 3rd day since these things happened" with the crucifixion being the last thing mentioned as happening. So if the 1st day of the week was the 3rd day since, then the 7th day of the week would be the 2nd since and the 6th day of the week would be the 1st day since, which makes the 5th day of the week the day when the last thing mentioned happened. Thus 4 calendar days were involved.

 

So the verses that say "on the third day" have to be referring to the third day after, with the word 'after' being understood in order to be in agreement with the first 3 verses.

 

 

 

 

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Still no quotes - I guess courtesy is too much to ask for!

 

reformed baptist,

re: "...how do you account for the clear (and far more frequent) references to a third day resurrection if you insist on having 3 days and 3 nights in the tomb/ dead - that would make the resurrection after the third day would it not?"

 

Indeed it would. And this is in line with Matthew 12:40, Mark 8:31, and Luke 24:21 which I asked you about in post #16.

 

Which I answered with a reasoned response - you are clearly avoiding the question posed back to you - why is that?

 

If Jesus said he would rise on 'the third day' and if the followers of Jesus said the tomb was empty on the third day, and if the testimony of the apostles is that Jesus rose on the third - how do you reconcile that with your view that Jesus was still in the tomb on the third day?

 

To be perfectly blunt - seeing that I have provided my reasoning for reconciling these texts, then there really isn't anything further for us to discuss is there?

 

re: "Where does Jesus Christ ever say Jonah was in the belly of the fish for 3 whole nights and 3 whole days?"

 

He doesn't. However, He does say that "... Jonah was three days and three nights in the belly of the great fish..."

 

OK - so your assuming that is what is meant!

 

re: "In fact where in the bible are we told exactly what 3 days and 3 nights means."

 

I don't think it's spelled out. But what in scripture makes it absolutely, no question about it, necessary to think that it doesn't mean that at least a portion of three daytimes and at least a portion of 3 night times is involved?

 

Where have i said it does?

 

 

re: "We have a biblical example in the life of Esther..."

 

The Esther account is not an appropriate example because nothing in the account precludes at least a portion of three daytimes and at least a portion of three night times.

 

Esthers speaks of three days and three nights (same language as the sign of Jonah)

 

Esther goes to the king on the third day (same timing as resurrection)

 

And you don't see that as significant in the discussion!

 

 

re: "How do you reconcile 'three days and three nights' and 'third day'?"

 

1. Matthew 12:40 has the Messiah saying that three days and three nights would be involved with His time in the "heart of the earth". The following comment is predicated on the belief that "the heart of the earth" is referring to the tomb or at the earliest to the time when His spirit left His body around the ninth hour. Now in order to have at least a part of each one of three daytimes and at least a part of each one of three night times, four calendar days would have to be involved.

 

2. Mark 8:31 has the Messiah saying that He would rise after 3 days. So 4 calendar days had to have been involved.

 

3. Luke 24:21 has the men on the road to Emmaus saying that the 1st day of the week "is the 3rd day since these things happened" with the crucifixion being the last thing mentioned as happening. So if the 1st day of the week was the 3rd day since, then the 7th day of the week would be the 2nd since and the 6th day of the week would be the 1st day since, which makes the 5th day of the week the day when the last thing mentioned happened. Thus 4 calendar days were involved.

 

So the verses that say "on the third day" have to be referring to the third day after, with the word 'after' being understood in order to be in agreement with the first 3 verses.

 

And I'm sure you can point out all these times we read 'after' in the context that you claim here?

 

NKJ Matthew 16:21 From that time Jesus began to show to His disciples that He must go to Jerusalem, and suffer many things from the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be killed, and be raised the third day.

 

NKJ Matthew 17:23 "and they will kill Him, and the third day He will be raised up." And they were exceedingly sorrowful.

 

NKJ Matthew 20:19 "and deliver Him to the Gentiles to mock and to scourge and to crucify. And the third day He will rise again."

 

NKJ Matthew 27:64 "Therefore command that the tomb be made secure until the third day, lest His disciples come by night and steal Him away , and say to the people,`He has risen from the dead.' So the last deception will be worse than the first."

 

NKJ Mark 9:31 For He taught His disciples and said to them, "The Son of Man is being betrayed into the hands of men, and they will kill Him. And after He is killed, He will rise the third day."

 

NKJ Mark 10:34 "and they will mock Him, and scourge Him, and spit on Him, and kill Him. And the third day He will rise again."

 

NKJ Luke 9:22 saying, "The Son of Man must suffer many things, and be rejected by the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be killed, and be raised the third day."

 

NKJ Luke 13:32 And He said to them, "Go, tell that fox,`Behold, I cast out demons and perform cures today and tomorrow, and the third day I shall be perfected.'

 

NKJ Luke 18:33 "They will scourge Him and kill Him. And the third day He will rise again."

 

NKJ Luke 24:7 "saying,`The Son of Man must be delivered into the hands of sinful men, and be crucified, and the third day rise again.'"

 

NKJ Luke 24:21 "But we were hoping that it was He who was going to redeem Israel. Indeed, besides all this, today is the third day since these things happened.

 

NKJ Luke 24:46 Then He said to them, "Thus it is written, and thus it was necessary for the Christ to suffer and to rise from the dead the third day,

 

NKJ John 2:1 On the third day there was a wedding in Cana of Galilee, and the mother of Jesus was there.

 

NKJ Acts 10:40 "Him God raised up on the third day, and showed Him openly,

 

NKJ 1 Corinthians 15:4 and that He was buried, and that He rose again the third day according to the Scriptures,

 

And just another one - when Luke says (Acts 27:19) On the third day we threw the ship's tackle overboard with our own hands. Does he really mean the fourth day - obviously not - that would be a nonsense.

 

With all due respect if your just going cite the same handful of verses, and insert a word into all the texts that prove you wrong to make them say some different then I really don't need to make any further case do I :RpS_cool:

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I'm amazed that this comes up every Easter time, and people continue to get so hung up on the 'sign of Jonah' and ignore the basic biblical principle of using the clear texts to understand the less clear ones.

 

Jesus Christ said he would rise again on the third day - eg. Matt 16:21

 

On the road to Emmaus those travelling report it was the third day, Luke 24:21 to which Jesus again responds that 'it is written that he would rise the third day' Luke 24:46

 

And this is the testimony of the apostles - Acts 10:40: 27:19 & 1 Cor 15:4

 

And we now the woman came on Sunday (after dawn) and found the tomb empty - so it is very simple to work it backwards:

 

Sunday - third day (day of resurrection)

Saturday - second day

Friday - first day

 

If we place the year of Jesus death as ad33 (as the early church obviously did to give us 0AD) we find that Passover occurred on the normal Sabbath Saturday and so preparation day, was a for a high sabbath that year - hence John was correct when he said Jesus was Crucified on a Friday (preparation day)

Can you prove that Passover fell on Saturday 33 AD?

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Rather than argue in vauge 'John wrote', .......

STRONGS NT 3904: παρασκευή

παρασκευή, παρασκευῆς, ἡ, from Herodotus down;

1. a making ready, preparation, equipping.

2. that which is prepared, equipment.

3. in the N. T. in a Jewish sense, the day of preparation, i. e. the day on which the Jews made the necessary preparation to celebrate a sabbath or a feast: Matthew 27:62; Mark 15:42; Luke 23:54; John 19:31 (Josephus, Antiquities 16, 6, 2); with a genitive of the object, τοῦ πάσχα (according to Winer's Grammar, 189 (177f) a possessive genitive), John 19:14 (cf. Rückert, Abendmahl, p. 31f); with a genitive of the subjunctive, τῶν Ἰουδαίων, ibid. 42. Cf. Bleek, Beiträge zur Evangelienkritik, p. 114ff; (on later usage cf. 'Teaching 8, 1 [ET] (and Harnack's note); Martyr. Polycarp, 7, 1 [ET] (and Zahn's note); Sophocles' Lexicon, under the word, 3).

 

Forgive me for shortening your post - I'm am well aware of what the many English translation say, let me ask you a question though - where is the word 'day' found in the Greek text? You may notice that the NKJV puts it in italics - that is because it isn't there!

 

Οἱ οὖν Ἰουδαῖοι, ἐπεὶ παρασκευὴ ἦν, ἵνα μὴ μείνῃ ἐπὶ τοῦ σταυροῦ τὰ σώματα ἐν τῷ σαββάτῳ, ἦν γὰρ μεγάλη ἡ ἡμέρα ἐκείνου τοῦ σαββάτου, ἠρώτησαν τὸν Πιλᾶτον ἵνα κατεαγῶσιν αὐτῶν τὰ σκέλη καὶ ἀρθῶσιν. (Joh 19:31 BGT)

 

It's simply 'preperation' (παρασκευὴ) so ask yourself does the insertion of the word day really clarify the emaning - well lets go to the lexiconms:

 

"67.201 παρασκευή, ῆς f: a day on which preparations were made for a sacred or feast day—‘day of preparation, Friday.’ τῇ δὲ ἐπαύριον, ἥτις ἐστὶν μετὰ τὴν παρασκευήν, συνήχθησαν ‘on the next day, the day after the day of preparation, they met’ or ‘the next day, which was a Sabbath, they met’ Mt 27:62. The identification of παρασκευή with Friday became so traditional that it eventually came to be the present-day Greek term for ‘Friday.’" [Louw, J. P., & Nida, E. A. (1996). Greek-English lexicon of the New Testament: based on semantic domains (electronic ed. of the 2nd edition., Vol. 1, p. 653). New York: United Bible Societies.]

 

In English we should translate παρασκευὴ when referring to a day as 'Friday' unless we have a good reason not to in my opinion.

 

 

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