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John Calvin puts forward a very simple reason why love is the greatest gift: “Because faith and hope are our own: love is diffused among others.” In other words, faith and hope benefit the possessor, but love always benefits another. In John 13:34–35 Jesus says, “A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.” Love always requires an “other” as an object; love cannot remain within itself, and that is part of what makes love the greatest gift.
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adssolsn

How to know you are worshiping money?

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The love of money is the root of all evil; but the million dollar question is how do i know am lôving money? its hard to tell since money is a necessity.

​​​​​​​my simple question is; how do you draw the line bêtween the need and love for money?

 

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The love of money is the root of all evil; but the million dollar question is how do i know am lôving money? its hard to tell since money is a necessity.

​​​​​​​my simple question is; how do you draw the line bêtween the need and love for money?

I think it depends on whether you are trying to get money as a means to fulfil your or another's needs, like food, shelter, etc, or money for its own sake. How easily could you let it go? If a stranger was dangling off a cliff and you had a choice to save them or a briefcase with £1M, and you save the briefcase you probably love money too much. (If you save a dollar bill instead of the stranger, you DEFINITELY love money too much!)

 

Will you hurt someone else to get it, lie, cheat, steal, and put it above your ethics and morals? There are people who will, and it is that type of destructive behaviour that is the evil money causes. If you remember it is a tool, and Caesar's not Christ's, it helps keep money's true value in perspective.

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Thanks @ChatterBox, I will definitely not hurt, lie or cheat anyone to get money. It's just that I sometimes find myself fussing too much about money than anything else.

And find myself working so hard to an extent of ignoring other important things.

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As Chatterbox stated, it's all about your perspective of it, if your intention is to make money for shelter, food or any other necessity then regardless of how hard you work it's justified. But once you focus on the meaningless material things in life and consider them as a priority, then you're walking in the wrong path.

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Staff
The love of money is the root of all evil; but the million dollar question is how do i know am lôving money? its hard to tell since money is a necessity.

​​​​​​​my simple question is; how do you draw the line bêtween the need and love for money?

 

It helps to read the context surrounding the verse in question. To answer your question covetousness is a sure sign that you're worshiping money, and its symptoms are an infinite sort of lusts:

 

1 Timothy 6:

 

Teach and urge these things. 3 If anyone teaches a different doctrine and does not agree with the sound[b] words of our Lord Jesus Christ and the teaching that accords with godliness, 4 he is puffed up with conceit and understands nothing. He has an unhealthy craving for controversy and for quarrels about words, which produce envy, dissension, slander, evil suspicions, 5 and constant friction among people who are depraved in mind and deprived of the truth, imagining that godliness is a means of gain. 6 But godliness with contentment is great gain, 7 for we brought nothing into the world, and[c] we cannot take anything out of the world. 8 But if we have food and clothing, with these we will be content. 9 But those who desire to be rich fall into temptation, into a snare, into many senseless and harmful desires that plunge people into ruin and destruction. 10 For the love of money is a root of all kinds of evils. It is through this craving that some have wandered away from the faith and pierced themselves with many pangs.

 

God bless,

William

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I don't know. I prioritize my family and I want to provide them a comfortable life. I don't try to live with luxury but I don't know if traveling is a luxury.

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Money is not a bad thing but it depends on how you spend it. If you are spending to feed your family and helping other then it is the best way to spend it. If you are spending it to disturb someone then it must be be bad. I always wanted a normal and simple life as i never want something that comes into the list of luxury.

 

We should earn enough money to buy food, clothes and other necessities for our family and poor people around us. It is my suggestion.

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Whether or not traveling is a luxury depends on where and why you travel.

 

I usually take my family to places they have never been as a form of appreciation or reward. Traveling, for me, is my way of encouraging them to bond and spend quality time together. Does that count as luxury?

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I usually take my family to places they have never been as a form of appreciation or reward. Traveling, for me, is my way of encouraging them to bond and spend quality time together. Does that count as luxury?

 

It doesn't sound like a luxury to me but this is an area where different people could have different opinions.

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I usually take my family to places they have never been as a form of appreciation or reward. Traveling, for me, is my way of encouraging them to bond and spend quality time together. Does that count as luxury?

 

Not really, we work hard in life so we need to treat ourselves from time to time to somethings we wouldn't be able to afford otherwise. Because i believe that if you only focus on making money you'll end up depressed and lose your motivation.

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Yes,I think you should never fall in love with money because it leads to all sorts of sin and evil,also jealousy or greed can make people do things they normally would not do. You can see how "for the love of money",can lead a person to commit greater sins against his fellow man but no one can serve two masters(God and money). Wealth can become a slave master and drive us further away from God.

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Money should be viewed as a tool, a means to an end. As we all know to well, we need it to live and we need it to afford our children opportunities and safety.

 

Ask yourself one simple question. What is your motivation for seeking money? Is it to provide a safe comfortable and nurturing environment for your family or yourself or is it simply for the pursuit of acquiring wealth. Money for the sake of money.

 

I have been there and it's a very fine line between providing for your family and slipping into the trap ofof money simply for the sake of money. If acquiring wealth interferes with your family life, robs you of time with loved ones and becomes the driving force in your life, you have crossed this line.

 

Take a step back and appraise what is really important to you in your life. I think you will find that the money appears at the bottom of the list.

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The love of money is the root of all evil; but the million dollar question is how do i know am lôving money? its hard to tell since money is a necessity.

my simple question is; how do you draw the line bêtween the need and love for money?

 

Two tests: Does the thought of not having money (beyond the necessities of life) cause you anxiety? If you didn't have money, (beyond the necessities of life) would you not want to live?

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There is another school of thought that beleves that worrying continuously about money, this applies to those who need it as opposed to those who obsess about it, actually hinders you making money.

 

You need to focus on the end goal and believe that your honest labour will be rewarded. In other words, focus on your actions, not the reward at the end. Work honestly, work ethicaly and your finances will take care of themselves.

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Remember that Judas, a disciple that watched Jesus Christ perform miracles, chose mammon.

 

He was also the treasurer of the group. I wonder how he got this job? Did he volunteer for it?

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