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John Calvin puts forward a very simple reason why love is the greatest gift: “Because faith and hope are our own: love is diffused among others.” In other words, faith and hope benefit the possessor, but love always benefits another. In John 13:34–35 Jesus says, “A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.” Love always requires an “other” as an object; love cannot remain within itself, and that is part of what makes love the greatest gift.
William

Baptism and Circumcision According to Colossians 2:11–12

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What follows is taken from a larger essay, “A Contemporary Reformed Defense of Infant Baptism:”

 

What is the Connection Between Circumcision and Baptism?

 

The connection between baptism and circumcision is quite clear in Colossians 2:11–12. The connection is not direct, but indirect and the point of contact between them is Christ and baptism is the sign and seal of that circumcision. In v.11 Paul says “in him [i.e. in Christ] you were also circumcised with the circumcision done by Christ” and in v.12 he says exactly how it is that we were circumcised in and by Christ: “having been buried with him in baptism and raised with him through your faith….” For Paul, in the New covenant, our union with Christ is our circumcision. In baptism, we are identified with Christ’s baptism/circumcision, as it were, on the cross. Neither baptism nor circumcision effects this union (ex opere operato), rather God the Spirit unites us to Christ, makes us alive and gives us faith.

 

The point not to be missed is that, in Paul’s mind, baptism and circumcision are both signs and seals of Christ’s baptism/circumcision on the cross for us. By faith, we are united to Christ’s circumcision and by union with Christ we become participants in his circumcision/baptism. Because circumcision pointed forward to Christ’s death and baptism looks back to Christ’s death, they are closely linked in Paul’s mind and almost interchangeable. Paul’s point here is to teach us about our union with Christ, but along the way we see how he thinks about baptism and circumcision and his thinking should inform ours.

 

One of the reasons that Paul so strongly opposed the imposition of circumcision upon Christians by the Judaizers is that, by faith, we have already been circumcised in Christ, of which baptism is the sign and seal. We were already identified as belonging to God and we have undergone the curse in Christ. So actual physical circumcision is, in the new covenant, unnecessary. Paul tells those who wish to circumcise themselves, to go the whole way and emasculate themselves.

 

Acts 2:38, 39 also links circumcision and baptism. In Acts 2:38 the Apostle Peter calls for repentance, faith in Christ and baptism by Jews who are hearing his preaching. In v.39 he gives the reason for this action: “the promise is to you and to your children, and all who are far off….” The Apostle Peter consciously uses the same formula in his preaching as the LORD himself used when he instituted the sign of circumcision in Genesis 17, which the Jews listening understood precisely.

 

What are the Relations Between Faith and Circumcision?

 

Romans 4:1–8, 13–25 teaches that Abraham was justified by grace alone, through faith alone and not by works and yet God required that Abraham take the sign (mark) of circumcision. Romans 4:11 says that circumcision was a sign and a seal of “the righteousness that he (Abraham) had by faith while he was still uncircumcised.” Circumcision was a sign of God’s covenantal relationship to Abraham and to Abraham’s children, all who believe in Christ. The meaning of circumcision was spiritual and not just outward. Circumcision as a sign of faith and entrance into the covenant people as a member was also applied to children.

 

What is the Relationship Between Faith and Baptism?

 

Acts 2:38, 39 says,

Repent and be baptized every one of you, in the name of Jesus Christ, so that your sins may be forgiven and you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit.
The promise is for you and for your children
and for many who are-for all whom the Lord our God will call.

For adult converts, baptism is a sign of what Christ has done for them, forgiven them and washed them. Adult converts are baptized in the name of Jesus Christ. Forgiveness is through faith in Christ. Baptism is a sign of our new standing with God through faith. Notice, v.39 “The promise (of salvation to those who believe) is for you and for your children.”

Our faith is in the Christ who died for us. Like circumcision, baptism is a sign of being united to him in his death by faith. Peter says that the flood waters of Noah symbolize baptism, because baptism is a sign of dying to sin, the washing away of sin by Christ’s blood, and living by faith in Christ.

 

Everyone, (adults and children), who has been baptized must be united by faith to Christ for salvation. Unbaptized, adult converts, profess their faith before baptism. Children of believers who received the sign in infancy profess their faith as soon as they are able. Both are responsible before God to be faithful to the grace represented by the sign and seal they have received.

 

That, however, has always been true. No one has ever been accepted by God except by grace alone, through faith alone, in Christ alone. Christ and his benefits were illustrated by a forward-looking sign and seal under Abraham, Moses, David, and the prophets. In Christ the fulfillment has come and we no longer have need of the bloody illustration. It has been fulfilled and replaced by an unbloody, sign and seal that looks back to Christ’s finished work. The promise that God made to Abraham, however, is explicitly repeated in the New Covenant by the Apostle Peter. Therefore that promise (the promise is to you and to your children) does not belong to the illustration (Abraham, Moses et al) only. Rather, the promise is also part of the covenant of grace. The administration of the promise included adults and children under Abraham and, according to Peter, it includes them in the New Covenant as well. This is why the Apostle Paul links circumcision and baptism via Christ’s death.

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Hi William,

 

  As with 1 Corinthians 12:13; Romans 6:3 and Galatians 3:27 I take this baptism to refer to the baptism with the Holy Spirit - water baptism is a "picture" of the believer dying and being raised up. 

 Notice also that according to Colossians 2:12 this baptism (both Spirit baptism and water baptism) is to be done through faith.

 It takes the one being baptized to have faith for this baptism to be effective.

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10 minutes ago, Faber said:

Hi William,

 

  As with 1 Corinthians 12:13Romans 6:3 and Galatians 3:27 I take this baptism to refer to the baptism with the Holy Spirit - water baptism is a "picture" of the believer dying and being raised up. 

 Notice also that according to Colossians 2:12 this baptism (both Spirit baptism and water baptism) is to be done through faith.

 It takes the one being baptized to have faith for this baptism to be effective.

And why wouldn't your argument also apply to the OT Covenant in which Paul and both Peter are making allusions to?

 

You're referring to the believer which again, there's no question as to whether Covenant heads are to demonstrate the fruits of the Spirit (confession, repentance, and faith). However, seems you're suggesting that the Covenant sign and seal should only be limited to Abraham, Moses, etc despite the covenant allusions including children? 

 

There is a degree of inference being made here as well as allusions and parallelism to the OT. Yet, children are not explicitly abrogated from the New Covenant. Actually, the language is strongly covenant yet it seemingly is being ignored.

 

Along these lines I can see why some state that paedo, covenant, and household baptism are illegitimate and they re-administer the sign seal of the Covenant of Grace for a symbolic proof of faith. I don't agree with it but I do understand the position.

 

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4 minutes ago, William said:

And why wouldn't your argument also apply to the OT Covenant in which Paul and both Peter are making allusions to?

 Because Colossians 2 is referring to the circumcision of the heart. A circumcision "made without hands" by Christ through the Holy Spirit (Romans 2:29; 2 Corinthians 3:6).

 

 When a person today is baptized with the Holy Spirit they receive a new heart - they are now members of the body of Christ.

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25 minutes ago, Faber said:

 Because Colossians 2 is referring to the circumcision of the heart. A circumcision "made without hands" by Christ through the Holy Spirit (Romans 2:29; 2 Corinthians 3:6).

 

 When a person today is baptized with the Holy Spirit they receive a new heart - they are now members of the body of Christ.

And Paul is using both circumcision and baptism as a sign and seal of our identification with Christ. Just as circumcision did not create the reality it signified (children were included in Covenant Israel) baptism signifies and seals without creating the reality (children are included in the body of Christ - Church). Even John the Baptist Matthew 3:11 water baptized as a sign to all and seal to believers of that future reality.

 

Lastly, I do not think we're tackling the issue at hand from a similar perspective. You're pointing to a reality that is in believers, and I'm pointing to a reality that is promised (to our children and those far off).

 

For example, we can look towards one baptism for the remission of sins. However, that one baptism (made in the past with water) may be linked to a future reality (regeneration).

 

Acts 2:38-39 Repent and be baptized every one of you, in the name of Jesus Christ, so that your sins may be forgiven and you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit. The promise is for you and for your children and for many who are-for all whom the Lord our God will call.

Genesis 17:7 And I will establish my covenant between me and you and your offspring after you throughout their generations for an everlasting covenant, to be God to you and to your offspring after you.

 

I'm just unable to disassociate the allusion to Genesis 17:7. Likewise I am unable to disassociate the Covenant sign and seal with the allusion and parallelism to the recipients. Something so important needs to have an explicit mention. 

 

If what you're suggesting is correct, the OT Covenant was far superior for those heads of households with children. Children in the OT shared Covenant blessings though themselves never demonstrated that they were inwardly called (regeneration). And other verses too, such as 1 Corinthians 7:14 which explicitly states that our children are set apart from children of the world.

 

God bless,

William

 

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20 minutes ago, William said:

And Paul is using both circumcision and baptism as a sign and seal of our identification with Christ. 

 

 He is not using circumcision in reference to physical circumcision for it is a circumcision "made without hands."

 Physical circumcision requires hands.

 See Philippians 3:3.

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Just now, Faber said:

 He is not using circumcision in reference to physical circumcision for it is a circumcision "made without hands."

 Physical circumcision requires hands.

 See Philippians 3:3.

That point is clear. As to why Paul is paralleling them is addressed in the OP. 

 

God bless,

William 

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