Jump to content

The Protestant Community

Sincerely inquiring about the Protestant faith? Welcome to Christforums the Christian Protestant community. You'll first need to register in order to join our community. Create or respond to threads on your favorite topics and subjects. Registration takes less than a minute, it's simple, fast, and free! Enjoy the fellowship! God bless, Christforums' Staff
Register now

Christian Fellowship

John Calvin puts forward a very simple reason why love is the greatest gift: “Because faith and hope are our own: love is diffused among others.” In other words, faith and hope benefit the possessor, but love always benefits another. In John 13:34–35 Jesus says, “A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.” Love always requires an “other” as an object; love cannot remain within itself, and that is part of what makes love the greatest gift.
Sign in to follow this  
Origen

Poll Question: Who is the Author of Hebrews?

Poll Question: Who is the Author of Hebrews?  

8 members have voted

  1. 1. Poll Question: Who is the Author of Hebrews?

    • Paul
    • Clement of Rome
      0
    • Luke
      0
    • Barnabas
      0
    • Other: Please explain in post.
    • Don't Know


Recommended Posts

Staff

Over the years numerous scholars have pondered this question: Who wrote the book of Hebrews? Many names have been suggested (i.e. Peter, Jude, Stephen, Philip the deacon, Aristion, Epaphras, Apollos, Priscilla and\or Aquiala etc.). The problem is that none of these have any early support. They are all, more or less, modern suggestions. Therefore I will stick to only authors that have some early support within church history.

Edited by Origen

Share this post


Link to post
Staff

If I were to guess, and that is all this would be, I would say most likely Paul but he used an amanuensis.

Share this post


Link to post
Staff

Thought to include a write up from Gotquestions.org: Who wrote the Book of Hebrews? Who was the author of Hebrews?

 

 

Answer: Theologically speaking, scholars generally regard the book of Hebrews to be second in importance only to Paul's letter to the Romans in the New Testament. No other book so eloquently defines Christ as high priest of Christianity, superior to the Aaronic priesthood, and the fulfillment of the Law and the Prophets. This book presents Christ as the Author and Perfecter of our faith (Hebrews 12:2). However, both the authorship and audience are in question.

 

The title, "To the Hebrews," which appears in the earliest known copy of the epistle is not a part of the original manuscript. There is no salutation, the letter simply begins with the assertion that Jesus, the Son of God, has appeared, atoned for our sins, and is now seated at the right hand of God in heaven (Hebrews 1:1-4).

 

The letter closes with the words "Grace be with you all" (Hebrews 13:25), which is the same closing found in each of Paul's known letters (see Romans 16:20; 1 Corinthians 16:23; 2 Corinthians 13:14; Galatians 6:18; Ephesians 6:24; Philippians 4:23; Colossians 4:18; 1 Thessalonians 5:28; 2 Thessalonians 3:18; 1 Timothy 6:21; 2 Timothy 4:22; Titus 3:15; and Philemon 25). However, it should be noted that Peter (1 Peter 5:14; 2 Peter 3:18) used similar—though not identical—closings. Possibly that it was simply customary to close letters like this with the words "Grace be with you all" during this time period.

 

Church tradition teaches that Paul wrote the book of Hebrews, and until the 1800s, that issue was closed. However, though a vast majority of Christians—both and scholars and the laity—still believe Paul wrote the book, there are some tempting reasons to think otherwise.

 

First and foremost is the lack of a salutation. Some sort of personal salutation from Paul appears in all of his letters. So it would seem that writing anonymously is not his usual method; therefore, the reasoning goes, Hebrews cannot be one of his letters. Second, the overall composition and style is of a person who is a very sophisticated writer. Even though he was certainly a sophisticated communicator, Paul stated that he purposely did not speak with a commanding vocabulary (1 Corinthians 1:17; 2:1; 2 Corinthians 11:6).

 

The book of Hebrews quotes extensively from the Old Testament. Paul, as a Pharisee, would have been familiar with the Scripture in its original Hebrew language. In other letters, Paul either quotes the Masoretic Text (the original Hebrew) or paraphrases it. However, all of the quotes in this epistle are taken out of the Septuagint (the Greek Old Testament), which is inconsistent with Paul's usage. Finally, Paul was an apostle who claimed to receive his revelations directly from the Lord Jesus (1 Corinthians 11:23; Galatians 1:12). The writer of Hebrews specifically says that he was taught by an apostle (Hebrews 2:3).

 

If Paul didn't write the letter, who did? The most plausible suggestion is that this was actually a sermon Paul gave and it was transcribed later by Luke, a person who would have had the command of the Greek language which the writer shows. Barnabas is another likely prospect, since he was a Levite and would have been speaking on a subject that he knew much about. Martin Luther suggested Apollos, since he would have had the education the writer of this letter must have had. Priscilla and Clemet of Rome have been suggested by other scholars.

 

However, there is still much evidence that Paul wrote the letter. The most compelling comes from Scripture itself. Remember that Peter wrote to the Hebrews (that is, the Jews; see Galatians 2:7, 9 and 1 Peter 1:1). Peter wrote: "...just as our dear brother Paul also wrote you with the wisdom that God gave him [emphasis added]" (2 Peter 3:15). In that last verse, Peter is confirming that Paul had also written a letter to the Hebrews!

 

The theology presented in Hebrews is consistent with Paul's. Paul was a proponent of salvation by faith alone (Ephesians 2:8, 9), and that message is strongly communicated in this epistle (Hebrews 4:2, 6:12, 10:19-22, 10:37-39, and 11:1-40). Either Paul wrote the epistle, or the writer was trained by Paul. Although it is a small detail, this epistle makes mention of Timothy (Hebrews 13:23), and Paul is the only apostle known to have ever done that in any letter.

 

So, who actually wrote Hebrews? The letter fills a needed space in Scripture and both outlines our faith and defines faith itself in the same way that Romans defines the tenets of Christian living. It closes the chapters of faith alone and serves as a prelude to the chapters on good works built on a foundation of faith in God. In short, this book belongs in the Bible. Therefore, its human author is unimportant. What is important is to treat the book as inspired Scripture as defined in 2 Timothy 3:16-17. The Holy Spirit was the divine author of Hebrews, and of all Scripture, even though we don't know who put the physical pen to the physical paper and traced the words.

 

God bless,

William

Share this post


Link to post

Luke wrote in a more sophisticated Greek style. Paul wrote with greater knowledge of scripture. If between their own handwritten works, there would never be a question of who wrote what. But, what if Luke wrote Paul's sermon? I doubt Luke would reword Paul's sermon.

 

I'm confidant Hebrews was accepted as canon in the days of the Apostles, so it belongs in the Bible, regardless of who wrote it. For the sake of tradition, I'll attribute it to Paul. And, Hebrews lacks the Greek sophistication of Luke's writing.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

I don't know who wrote Hebrews but I don't believe it was Paul because of this statement in Hebrews 2:3: "It was declared at first by the Lord, and it was attested to us by those who heard." The author of Hebrews heard the message of salvation from someone else. Paul heard it directly from Jesus.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Staff

Anyone else have any thoughts on the topic?

Share this post


Link to post
Staff

Lots of new people here. Any thought?

Share this post


Link to post

I personally think it is Paul who wrote it, though I don't hold any weight behind it. If someday we find a manuscript with Luke's name on it or something I have no issue switching sides.

 

The reason I think it was written by Paul mostly comes from my understanding of the audiences of the books. The majority of Paul's letters were written to Gentiles, and so they were written in a manner that was familiar to them. Using language, idioms, and allusions that the audience would be familiar with and would understand. The book of Hebrews was written for the Jews, a completely different audience with a completely different history and background. And consequently Paul changed his writing style to match the people he would have been writing too.

 

Ultimately though I don't feel it's a very important issue, the book was meant to be in the bible so that's good enough for me.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Topics

    • Electrical Question

      This is for the electrical engineers of the group, or at those who fancy themselves in that group.  I have a couple of motion sensor switches I want to install in my bathrooms.  The problem is that nearly nothing in this house is grounded, as it was built in the 50's.  My question is, is it possible, or simply inadvisable, to connect the ground wire of the switch to the neutral wire, which should ultimately be connected to the main ground out at the power pole?  Is this stupidly dangerous, or ac

      in Computers & Technology

    • Supreme Court To Decide On Citizenship Question In 2020 Census

      By Kevin Daley - The Supreme Court will decide whether the Trump administration may include a citizenship question on the 2020 census questionnaire. The justices released a short order Friday granting the government’s appeal of a lower court order which struck the citizenship question from the census form. The high court will hear oral arguments on the matter in April and issue a decision by late June. U.S. District Judge Jesse Furman found that the administration unlawfully appended the

      in Political Conservative News

    • Beto Answers Dan Crenshaw’s Question: Would You Take Down The Border Wall?

      By Molly Prince - Former Democratic Rep. Beto O’Rourke stated on Thursday that he would remove the existing border barrier in his hometown of El Paso if he had the ability to do so, a question proposed to him by his fellow Texan, Republican Rep. Dan Crenshaw. Prior to President Donald Trump’s rally in El Paso on Monday, Crenshaw tweeted at O’Rourke asking “if you could snap your fingers and make El Paso’s border wall disappear, would you?” “Yes, absolutely. I’d take the wall down,” O’Rou

      in Political Conservative News

    • House Oversight Set To Drag Wilbur Ross In Front Of Congress Over Citizenship Question

      By Evie Fordham - The House Oversight Committee will question Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross in March about a citizenship question he supported adding back to the 2020 census, the committee announced Tuesday. The announcement from the committee, which is headed by Democratic Maryland Rep. Elijah Cummings, comes less than a week after a federal judge ordered the removal of the question Jan. 15. U.S. District Judge Jesse Furman said that Ross’s department violated federal law by including a

      in Political Conservative News

    • Trump Administration Will Ask The Supreme Court To Protect The Census Citizenship Question

      By Kevin Daley - The Trump administration will ask the Supreme Court to decide whether the government can append a citizenship question to the 2020 census questionnaire, the Department of Justice said Tuesday. U.S. District Judge Jesse Furman forbade the government from incorporating the citizenship question on Jan. 15 in a sweeping decision that ran almost 300 pages. At the administration’s bidding, the Court agreed to review a separate question arising from the citizenship case in Decem

      in Political Conservative News

×
×
  • Create New...