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John Calvin puts forward a very simple reason why love is the greatest gift: “Because faith and hope are our own: love is diffused among others.” In other words, faith and hope benefit the possessor, but love always benefits another. In John 13:34–35 Jesus says, “A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.” Love always requires an “other” as an object; love cannot remain within itself, and that is part of what makes love the greatest gift.
Origen

What are you reading right now?

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Just finished this.

 

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Just started this.

 

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Just picked up from where I left off some months ago. "A Case for Amillennialism: Understanding the End Times" by Kim Riddlebarger

 

 

 

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I was beginning to wonder if this thread was going to get any action. Thanks William

 

Hey folks it could be any kind of book or story. I, myself, have read all of Edgar Allan Poe's short stories and poems many, many times. Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories are my favorite.

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I just purchased Pilgrim's Progress for my daughter. I hope she reads it. There is an incentive in the book, a hundred dollar bill, but I will not tell her that it is there. It will stay there unknown unless she reads it. :rolleyes:

 

I went to a Ligonier conference where the central subject was Pilgrim's Progress. I was blown away by the story of John Bunyan and thought to pass it forward to my daughter.

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There is an incentive in the book, a hundred dollar bill, but I will not tell her that it is there. It will stay there unknown unless she reads it.

Or until she reads your post and finds out it is there.

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Or until she reads your post and finds out it is there.
LOL There is a flaw in Williams' plan.

 

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I was beginning to wonder if this thread was going to get any action.

 

If you had used the word "watching" rather than "reading", I'd have more to say. What worthless TV show am I wasting my life with right now?

I've been reading the 新譯本 translation of the Bible to polish my Chinese reading skills.

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If you had used the word "watching" rather than "reading", I'd have more to say. What worthless TV show am I wasting my life with right now?
LOL We can expand the topic. So what worthless TV shows are you wasting your life with right now? There is nothing really out there right now for me but The Walking Dead will be back soon.

 

I've been reading the 新譯本 translation of the Bible to polish my Chinese reading skills.
Wow! Do you know any other languages?

 

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LOL We can expand the topic. So what worthless TV shows are you wasting your life with right now? There is nothing really out there right now for me but The Walking Dead will be back soon.

 

Wow! Do you know any other languages?

 

Chinese is super-easy to learn to read. The grammar of sentences is a western concept, so not a problem in Chinese. The words are pictographs, so you can learn to read Chinese in English. For example, the word for woman is the side view of a stick figure, with boobs, on her knees. It's abstract enough that you wouldn't recognize it without being told what it is, but once you know, you don't forget. When I read the Chinese word for woman, I read it as "woman". The word milk in Chinese is a pictograph of a cow along with a pictograph for, let's say, an udder. I'll actually read it in English as "milk". The closest to Chinese I speak is Sino-Korean and so a Chinese speaker would have a very hard time understanding what I'm speaking ("oo-you" for milk, "nyo" for woman, although, I actually do know the Mandarin pronunciation of these two examples).

 

With most languages, you have to actually know the language to read it, not so with Chinese. With Chinese, you just have to know the easy-to-learn alphabet, as it were.

 

Of Asian languages, I've read the Bible in Khmer (Cambodian) and Korean. Now, I'm reading it in Chinese. Asian Christians really have an uphill battle studying the Bible, because their languages are so imprecise and their translations so amateurish (i.e. I don't think the translators aren't Bible experts, so they don't see a problem with translating "daily bread" as "today's food.", for example).

 

Learning language is a hobby of mine.

 

 

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Or until she reads your post and finds out it is there.

 

Just learned this morning that she has already found her Christmas gift within the book. She doesn't read this forum, though I wish she would. Perhaps next year we may see her. She's currently in her 3rd year of Nursing school working towards a B.S. from Pacific Lutheran University. She has delayed her required religious classes until her 4th year, but I hope that those classes as well as the reading material I have provided fans some dying embers.

 

God bless,

William

 

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Just learned this morning that she has already found her Christmas gift within the book. She doesn't read this forum, though I wish she would. Perhaps next year we may see her. She's currently in her 3rd year of Nursing school working towards a B.S. from Pacific Lutheran University. She has delayed her required religious classes until her 4th year, but I hope that those classes as well as the reading material I have provided fans some dying embers.

 

God bless,

William

Hi William, From your bought book, we can tell that it represent Dad´s love and hope for daughter. She is a lucky girl that the God gives her a good dad. Reading your this gift post make me miss my dad more , i cant love my dad enough, I also love any gift from my dad too, the most thing my dad did for me i kept in my memory ,so that when i miss my dad , i can recall it.

 

God bless

 

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I just started Cost Of Discipleship by Deitrich Bonhoeffer. I need to spend more time reading and less time crocheting so my cats can get in my lap (according to them anyway).

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I just started Cost Of Discipleship by Deitrich Bonhoeffer. I need to spend more time reading and less time crocheting so my cats can get in my lap (according to them anyway).
Hey thanks. I completely forgot about this topic. Since you brought it up, I am almost done with this.

TOVSEPTUA3.jpg

 

 

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Reading "Acts Life Application Bible Studies." It's in NLV so it's different but its very detailed, containing maps of Pete's and Paul's travels as well as in-text character profiles. Found it free at a thrift store.

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Hey thanks. I completely forgot about this topic. Since you brought it up, I am almost done with this.

TOVSEPTUA3.jpg

 

 

That's quite an interesting title. What does it have to add to what we already know?

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That's quite an interesting title. What does it have to add to what we already know?
Before the Dead Sea scrolls were discovered (between 1946 and 1956) the earliest witness was the Greek text of the O.T. not the Hebrew (by the way fragments of the Greek text were also found among the Dead Sea scrolls). The oldest complete Hebrew texts are the Aleppo Codex (ca. 920) and the Leningrad Codex (1008\9).

 

O.T. quotes in the N.T. are almost always from the LXX not the Hebrew text. The church fathers used the LXX almost exclusively. There are two notable exceptions Origen and Jerome but even they still used the LXX.

 

One interesting point is that the Greek text and the Hebrew text don't always match. There are differences between the two texts.

 

Another important point concern the early copies of the LXX and the use of the tetragrammaton (i.e. the divine name). Here are two fragments of the LXX. In the Greek text the tetragrammaton is written in the Paleo-Hebrew script (see arrows below). lxxminorprophets.gif

lxxjob.gif

 

I know it does not look like much to those who do not know what they are looking at but it is important. These are Jewish copies of the LXX not Christian. The reason we know this is that the tetragrammaton is present in the text. This practice was not followed by Christians.

Edited by Origen

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I am reading Burn, a novel by Ted Dekker and Erin Healy. After reading the previous posts, about books that help in our understanding of the Bible, I am almost afraid to admit that I am spending time on a book like this. :)

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I am reading Burn, a novel by Ted Dekker and Erin Healy. After reading the previous posts, about books that help in our understanding of the Bible, I am almost afraid to admit that I am spending time on a book like this. :)
Don't be. Every year I read the Sherlock Holmes stories, all of them. I love them. I have read 1984 more times than I can remember. And I also read Edgar Allan Poe's works over and over again. I just don't get into anything modern. Old is better, at least to me.
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Before the Dead Sea scrolls were discovered (between 1946 and 1956) the earliest witness was the Greek text of the O.T. not the Hebrew (by the way fragments of the Greek text were also found among the Dead Sea scrolls). The oldest complete Hebrew texts are the Aleppo Codex (ca. 920) and the Leningrad Codex (1008\9).

 

O.T. quotes in the N.T. are almost always from the LXX not the Hebrew text. The church fathers used the LXX almost exclusively. There are two notable exceptions Origen and Jerome but even they still used the LXX.

 

One interesting point is that the Greek text and the Hebrew text don't always match. There are differences between the two texts.

 

Another important point concern the early copies of the LXX and the use of the tetragrammaton (i.e. the divine name). Here are two fragments of the LXX. In the Greek text the tetragrammaton is written in the Paleo-Hebrew script (see arrows below). lxxminorprophets.gif

lxxjob.gif

 

I know it does not look like much to those who do not know what they are looking at but it is important. These are Jewish copies of the LXX not Christian. The reason we know this is that the tetragrammaton is present in the text. This practice was not followed by Christians.

 

Thank you, Origen. That is just fascinating.

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I am reading Burn, a novel by Ted Dekker and Erin Healy. After reading the previous posts, about books that help in our understanding of the Bible, I am almost afraid to admit that I am spending time on a book like this. :)

 

If it helps, one of my favorite books is about a pair of possibly crazy men who started a cattle ranch in British Colombia :D I just thought I might should be reading something a little more serious about now.

Edited by Meg
typo

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Right now I am reading 2 books, "Stupor Mundi: The Life and Times of Frederick II, Emperor of the Romans, King of Sicily and Jerusalem", by Lionel Allshorn, and "The Book of Concord, the Lutheran Confessions of Faith". The first is research for a book I am writing. The second is for personal spiritual enlightenment.

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