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northwye

Tyndale's Translation of II Thessalonians 2: 3-8 and of Ekklesia

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Tyndale's Translation of II Thessalonians 2: 3-8 and of Ekklesia

William Tyndale has credibility as a lone translator of the Textus Receptus Greek of Erasmus. See: http://www.themoorings.org/doctrine/...rsions/WH.htm

"It will be seen that in these nine chapters more than 83% of the words in the Geneva Version were taken direct from Tyndale, and more than 81% of the words in the King James Version. I believe this sample is statistically valid for the whole New Testament."

 

Tyndale also has credibility as a Remnant leader of the Reformation who wrote in the English of the 16th century, which we can mostly understand. The writings of other major leaders of he Reformation were in German or Latin.  Tyndale's dates are 1494–1536, Luther's dates are 1483-1546, while Calvin lived from 1509 to  1564.


Tyndale's 1526  translation of  Oikonomia, is different from  the Catholic English New Testament of Wycliffe  of about 1382, which has  the Old English spelling "dispensacioun."   Tyndale translated Oikonomia as  office, ministration and ordinance in I Corinthians 9: 17,  Ephesians 1: 10. Ephesians 3: 2 and in Colossians  1: 25.

Then Theodore Beza, a Calvinist, returned to the translation of Oikonomia as dispensation.  The Geneva Bible Committee followed Beza and used dispensation for Oikonomia. While Wycliffe in his Catholic English New Testament used the Old English spelling of Chirche, Tyndale broke with Catholic tradition and used Congregation for ekklesia consistently.

 

There are other translations of Greek words by Tyndale which are interesting.

Here is the King James Version for II Thessalonians 2: 3-8:

"Let no man deceive you by any means: for that day
shall not come, unless there
come a falling away first, and that man of sin be revealed, the son of perdition;
Who opposes and exalts himself above all that is called God, or that is worshipped;
so that he as God sits in the temple of God, showing
himself that he is God. Remember ye not, that when I was yet with you, I told
you these things?

And now you know what withholds, that he might be revealed
in his time. For the mystery of iniquity does already work: only he who now lets
will let, until he be taken out of the way. And then shall that wicked be revealed, whom the Lord
shall consume with the spirit of his mouth, and shall destroy
with the brightness of his coming..."

II Thessalonians 2: 7 is translated differently in the King James Version than in Tyndale's 1534 New Testament. Tyndale says

Here is William Tyndale's 1534 translation of II Thessalonians 2: 3-8:

"Let no man deceive you by any means, for the Lord comes not, unless there come
a departing first, and that sinful man be revealed,
the son of perdition which is an
adversary, and is exalted above all that is called
God, or that is worshipped: so that
he shall sit as God in the temple of God, and show
himself as God. Remember ye
not, that when I was yet with you, I told you these
things?

And now you know what withholds, that he might be revealed at his time.
For the mystery of that iniquity
does he already work, which only locks until it be
taken out of the way. And then shall that wicked be revealed, whom the Lord shall consume with the spirit of his mouth, and shall destroy with the appearance of
his coming..."

The Tyndale  New Testament for II Thessalonians 2: 3-8  says  "For the mystery of that iniquity
does he already work, which only locks until it be
taken out of the way."

But the King James says "For the mystery of iniquity does already work: only he who now lets
will let, until he be taken out of the way."

Tyndale's translation does not include a restrainer in II Thessalonians 2: 3-8 as does the King James Version.

Letteth" is from The Greek kateko, Strong's Exhaustive Concordance Number 2722, "to hold down, withhold..." Letteth can mean to restrain. But Tyndale translates it as "locks," meaning to lock in place that takeover of the temple of God in the believer by the sinful man.

In his writings Tyndale explains that the anti-Christ is not a single individual but is a present danger to Christians, since it is not something that is always in the future.

Lets see what the Geneva Bible says for II Thessalonians 2: 7, "For the mysterie of iniquitie doeth already worke: onely he which nowe withholdeth, shall let till he be taken out of the way."

The Geneva Bible translation group changed Tyndale's translation of II Thessalonians 2: 7 and the King James Committee followed the Geneva Bible.

There is also a significant  difference between the King James translation for ekklesia and that of the Tyndale New Testament.

John Wyclife, of England,  translated the Latin word ecclesiam into chirche  - in old English spelling.  Wycliffe did not have the Textus Receptus Greek text that Tyndale used, but Wycliffe used the Latin Vulgate

But then William Tyndale in his 1526 New Testament consistently translated ekklesia as congregation, except for Acts 14: 13 and Acts 19: 37 where he used churche, meaning a pagan place of worship. Tyndale broke with Catholic tradition and used congregation for ekklesia something which might have contributed to his being strangled at the stake by the Catholics.

And after the death of John Calvin, Theodore Beza in 1556 returned to the use of church to translate ekklesia - and the Geneva Bible followed him, using church instead of congregation. Beza returned to the Catholic Capital C Church translation of ekklesia as chirche.

I Peter 5: 2-3 says "Feed the flock of God which is among you, taking the oversight thereof, not by constraint, but willingly; not for filthy lucre, but of a ready mind;
3. Neither as being lords over God's heritage, but being ensamples to the flock."

In the Catholic Church the clergy class tended to rule over the congregations like "lords over God's heritage," controlling in detail the doctrines followed by the people under them. This is what is meant by the Capital C Church.  Since ekklesia is a common noun, so any word used to translate it should also be a common noun, not capitalized.

Any doctrine is established by the original meaning of the Hebrew or Greek words used to express that doctrine. A translation into English should not change that doctrine. Strong's Exhaustive Concordance defines ekklesia, number 1577, as "a calling out, i.e. (to) a popular meeting, especially a religious congregation..."

See: http://www.christianassemblies.co/in...icle&article=1

"The word "church" was used by Theodore Beza in 1556, a Protestant, who followed John Calvin at Geneva, Switzerland. As a Presbyterian, Beza believed in the idea of a catholic church and its hierarchical form of government and therefore chose to support this false concept by using the word "church" instead of "assembly." The reason is obvious in that the use of the word "congregation" or "assembly" would not support his church's hierarchical form of church government. William Whittingham's Testament of 1557 followed Beza's usage of "church" and was actually the first edition of the Geneva Bible and was a revision of the Tyndale New Testament."

The Geneva and King James translations consistently use church for ekklesia. Congregation has a meaning  closer to the meaning of ekklesia, as a meeting, assembly or congregation, than does church which the Oxford English Dictionary reveals. See: http://civ.icelord.net/read.php?f=3&i=63650&t=63650&v=f

"CHURCH: FORMS: (a) cirice, cyrice, chiriche, churiche, chereche, CIRCE, cyrce, chyrce, cirke, etc., etc."

"...there is now a general
agreement among scholars in referring it to the Greek word, properly kurion adj. 'of the Lord, dominicum, dominical' (f. Kurios lord), which
occurs, from the 3rd century at least, used substantively (sc. doma, or the like) = 'house of the Lord.." But the early use of Kurios was perhaps to a pagan house of worship."

The Oxford English Dictionary mentions the Greek goddess circe, and also says in caps in its list of spellings of church, the word CIRCE. The Catholic Encyclopedia lists circe as one spelling of church, but does not mention a possible origin of circe from the Greek goddess circe.




 

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