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I personally love this Bible. I have had mine for about 4 months now, and can't imagine reading without it. The notes are so helpful, and really give great insight to the Word. I love the old English, it really adds a poetic element, making it much easier to memorize. 

 

Your thoughts? Like or Dislike? 

Would love to have discussion! 

 

God Bless!

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Bought a copy for my daughter when she began attending Pacific Lutheran University thinking the notes may help in her religion classes.  I use the electronic version with notes in ESword. 

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1 hour ago, William said:

Bought a copy for my daughter when she began attending Pacific Lutheran University thinking the notes may help in her religion classes.  I use the electronic version with notes in ESword. 

I absolutely love mine. It has helped me grow leaps and bounds in my understanding of the Word. 

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Ok I can check on line brothers but real life testimonials are best .

So what stands out the most . I have my My top 4 - 5  ( NASB ESV NKJV KJV and Amp ) that I have read some several times and am looking a new one to read . I have considered the Geneva Bible and the NET Bible. So on the personal level what is it about the Geneva that stands out ? I hear a lot about the notes can you elaborate? 

Blessings 

Bill 

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2 hours ago, Laish said:

Ok I can check on line brothers but real life testimonials are best .

So what stands out the most . I have my My top 4 - 5  ( NASB ESV NKJV KJV and Amp ) that I have read some several times and am looking a new one to read . I have considered the Geneva Bible and the NET Bible. So on the personal level what is it about the Geneva that stands out ? I hear a lot about the notes can you elaborate? 

Blessings 

Bill 

The Geneva Bible's notes were written by actual "Reformers". Consider the political motives which were behind the KJV. For me, the Geneva footnotes in my ESword are often visited but I glean far more from other reformed commentators like Calvin, Henry, etc. I like the net bible too as I have it also loaded in my ESword but it's more grammatical rather than theological. My bible preference to this day is the ESV (personal preference).

 

Consider the controversy or conflict of interest King James may of had with the Geneva and notes:

 

But it was not just that the Geneva Bible came from the republican, Presbyterian city of Geneva. It was much more. For King James, such an ecclesiology was evident in the annotations of the GB itself. McGrath has led the way in this regard, giving several examples of annotations upon texts King James disapproved of.[35] The annotations challenged the “divine right of kings,” a doctrine advocated by King James (cf. True Law of Free Monarchies of 1598; Basilikon Doron of 1598). As he says in Basilikon Doron, “God gives not Kings the style of Gods in vain, For on his throne his Sceptre do they sway; And as their subject ought them to obey, So Kings should fear and serve their God again.” The divine right of kings was foundational to monarchy. However, certain texts and annotations in the GB, which we must consider, undermined such a doctrine.

 

(1) Daniel 6:22 is an example of Daniel disobeying the King and being approved by God in so doing. The text states, “My just cause and uprightness in this thing in which I was charged, is approved by God.” The GB comments, “For he disobeyed the king’s wicked commandment in order to obey God, and so he did no injury to the king, who ought to command nothing by which God would be dishonoured.”

 

(2) Daniel 11:36 is a second text where the king is viewed as a tyrant. Notice the comment, “So long the tyrants will prevail as God has appointed to punish his people: but he shows that it is but for a time.” Surely, the political application to the sixteenth and early seventeenth century is impossible to ignore. Like Israel, God’s people, the Puritans were also being punished for their iniquities by wicked rulers. However, in due time, God would bring down the king. McGrath observes that the “Genevan notes regularly use the word ‘tyrant’ to refer to kings; the King James Bible never uses this word–a fact noted with approval as much as relief by many royalists at this point.”[36]

 

(3) Exodus 1:19 is yet a third example where Pharaoh wickedly commands the Hebrew midwives to kill all male Hebrew newborns. The midwives refused and even lied saying the “Hebrew women are not as the Egyptian women; for they are lively, and are delivered ere the midwives come in unto them.” The GB says that their disobedience in this act was lawful (though it qualifies that their deception was evil). Tricking the tyrant is allowed by the law. McGrath draws the parallel to the seventeenth century, “As radical Protestant factions, such as the Puritans, began to view James as their oppressor, the suggestion that it was lawful to disobey him became increasingly welcome to Puritans and worrying to James.”[37]

 

(4) 2 Chronicles 15:15-17 was yet another text with annotations King James disliked. Here King Asa discovers his own mother, Maachah, committing idolatry and so he removes her and cuts down her idol, burning it. Yet, he did not remove the high places nor kill her. The GB comments, however, that King Asa did not go far enough. He “showed that he lacked zeal, for she should have died both by the covenant and by the law of God, but he gave place to foolish pity and would also seem after a sort to satisfy the law.” King Asa’s lack of zeal contributed to his “negligence of his officers” and “his people’s superstition.” McGrath again observes that the parallel to King James is hard to avoid. James’ mother, Mary, Queen of Scots, had been executed by Elizabeth I. Without a doubt, James would have cringed at such commentary. Moreover, the commentary is clear that even the king is subservient to the law. His own pity cannot get in the way of his religious commitments.[38]

 

(5) Psalm 105:15 is the last text we will consider, “Touch not mine anointed, and do my prophets no harm.” While the GB saw the anointed here as referring to God’s people corporately, the KJV identified the anointed as the king himself. McGrath observes, “The text was thus interpreted [by the GB] in a way that made no reference whatsoever to the ‘divine right of kings.’ According to the Geneva Bible the text was actually, if anything, a criticism of kings, in that their right to harm the people of God was being absolutely denied.”[39]

 

To conclude, the implication of these texts and annotations is very lucid: the king must be disobeyed if he violates the will of God and commands us to do likewise. McGrath summarizes the issue insightfully, “James I held that kings had been ordained by God to rule the nations of the world, to promote justice, and to dispense wisdom. It was, therefore, imperative that kings should be respected and obeyed unconditionally and in all circumstances. The ample notes provided by the Geneva Bible taught otherwise. Tyrannical kings should not be obeyed; indeed, there were excellent reasons for suggesting that they should be overthrown.”[40]

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10 hours ago, Laish said:

Ok I can check on line brothers but real life testimonials are best .

So what stands out the most . I have my My top 4 - 5  ( NASB ESV NKJV KJV and Amp ) that I have read some several times and am looking a new one to read . I have considered the Geneva Bible and the NET Bible. So on the personal level what is it about the Geneva that stands out ? I hear a lot about the notes can you elaborate? 

Blessings 

Bill 

Sure! 

~ For me, one of the main things that I really enjoy about the Geneva is the poetic language. Since the Lord drew me to Himself, I used the KJV to memorize portions of Scripture... it was just easier for me to remember for some reason. I loved the KJV language, but really wanted to get a study bible whose notes I could trust would not lead me astray, and in doing some research, I came upon the Geneva Bible. I actually found one on Ebay for relatively cheap, so I decided to give it a try. I was not at all disappointed. So for me, the first thing that personally stands out is the poetic language.

 

~ Secondly, I can't get enough of the notes. Many, many times, I'll be reading a portion of the Scriptures, and get confused as to what was actually trying to be said. Then I'll look at the notes, and be like "Ohhh! Ok!" It has helped me grow so much in my understanding of the Word. Though at times they can be a bit hard to understand due to the old English, but really all I need to do is re-read the note a bit slower and actually digest what it is saying, which personally I find is a nice check to make sure I am actually taking my time and digesting not just skimming the Word. 

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38 minutes ago, Mjh29 said:

Sure! 

~ For me, one of the main things that I really enjoy about the Geneva is the poetic language. Since the Lord drew me to Himself, I used the KJV to memorize portions of Scripture... it was just easier for me to remember for some reason. I loved the KJV language, but really wanted to get a study bible whose notes I could trust would not lead me astray, and in doing some research, I came upon the Geneva Bible. I actually found one on Ebay for relatively cheap, so I decided to give it a try. I was not at all disappointed. So for me, the first thing that personally stands out is the poetic language.

 

~ Secondly, I can't get enough of the notes. Many, many times, I'll be reading a portion of the Scriptures, and get confused as to what was actually trying to be said. Then I'll look at the notes, and be like "Ohhh! Ok!" It has helped me grow so much in my understanding of the Word. Though at times they can be a bit hard to understand due to the old English, but really all I need to do is re-read the note a bit slower and actually digest what it is saying, which personally I find is a nice check to make sure I am actually taking my time and digesting not just skimming the Word. 

Ok cool . 

My interest is the notes . That’s why I am drawn to the Geneva and NET translations .  I like to know what was going through the translators mind on word choice . That and along with  getting a glimpse of their theological beliefs is cool . 

I do like the  near poetic sense of Early Modern English. So that’s a plus. I have some experience with Shakespeare’s plays so the language is easy to digest. That and reading other early English translations has given me a leg up . I will probably get both in hard copy format.  Electric is cool but nothing beats the feel and (do I say it? )smell of a leather bound Bible.

I am just weird that way. It’s actually funny the first thing I do is thumb my way to the approximate middle of a new book I get while I bury my face in the book and inhale lol.  I did say weird. No I am not going to ask how doses it smell . 

Now deciding the one to purchase first is the issue. Leaning heavily towards the Geneva right now .  

Blessings 

 Bill 

 

 

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Laish said:

Ok cool . 

My interest is the notes . That’s why I am drawn to the Geneva and NET translations .  I like to know what was going through the translators mind on word choice . That and along with  getting a glimpse of their theological beliefs is cool . 

I do like the  near poetic sense of Early Modern English. So that’s a plus. I have some experience with Shakespeare’s plays so the language is easy to digest. That and reading other early English translations has given me a leg up . I will probably get both in hard copy format.  Electric is cool but nothing beats the feel and (do I say it? )smell of a leather bound Bible.

I am just weird that way. It’s actually funny the first thing I do is thumb my way to the approximate middle of a new book I get while I bury my face in the book and inhale lol.  I did say weird. No I am not going to ask how doses it smell . 

Now deciding the one to purchase first is the issue. Leaning heavily towards the Geneva right now .  

Blessings 

 Bill

 

I agree with you in that there's nothing like the feel of a real bible. However, I like being able to turn to a verse in electronic form as quickly as it came to me. There are pros and cons to each.

 

Just emphasizing there's no reason why you can't have both. Here's ESword which is free. Only some of the addons cost money but many of the commentators I use plugged into the program are offered in the download section of the program:

 

 

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23 minutes ago, Laish said:

Ok cool . 

My interest is the notes . That’s why I am drawn to the Geneva and NET translations .  I like to know what was going through the translators mind on word choice . That and along with  getting a glimpse of their theological beliefs is cool . 

I do like the  near poetic sense of Early Modern English. So that’s a plus. I have some experience with Shakespeare’s plays so the language is easy to digest. That and reading other early English translations has given me a leg up . I will probably get both in hard copy format.  Electric is cool but nothing beats the feel and (do I say it? )smell of a leather bound Bible.

I am just weird that way. It’s actually funny the first thing I do is thumb my way to the approximate middle of a new book I get while I bury my face in the book and inhale lol.  I did say weird. No I am not going to ask how doses it smell . 

Now deciding the one to purchase first is the issue. Leaning heavily towards the Geneva right now .  

Blessings 

 Bill 

 

 

 

 

 

I literally do the exact same thing. It smells amazing! The pages in the one I have are just the slightest tinge yellow, and I absolutely love that! I keep a leather polish wipe in my Bible case, because I can't stand when it gets handprints all over it lol!! 

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16 minutes ago, William said:

I agree with you in that there's nothing like the feel or a real bible. However, I like being able to turn to a verse in electronic form as quickly as it came to me. There are pros and cons to each.

 

Just emphasizing there's no reason why you can't have both. Here's ESword which is free. Only some of the addons cost money but many of the commentators I use plugged into the program are offered in the download section of the program:

 

 

I agree e Bibles are great . How evever we get into The Word is excellent!  Also e-Sword is awesome. I was so happy when I was finally Abel to get it on my iPad.  I use it often I use it to get the Greek or Hebrew definition of words and John Gill’s commentary on every verse I the Bible is always a help . It’s free too !  Thanks always for the reminder.

 Blessings 

 Bill 

 

 

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2 minutes ago, Laish said:

I agree e Bibles are great . How evever we get into The Word is excellent!  Also e-Sword is awesome. I was so happy when I was finally Abel to get it on my iPad.  I use it often I use it to get the Greek or Hebrew definition of words and John Gill’s commentary on every verse I the Bible is always a help . It’s free too !  Thanks always for the reminder.

 Blessings 

 Bill 

 

 

John Gill, you're Baptist? Just curious!

 

On the Esword site you can find other commentators to download for free. Like Calvin, Luther, and Spurgeon (if Baptist is your flavor).

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1 minute ago, William said:

John Gill, you're Baptist? Just curious!

Lol I attended a Presbyterian Church  I enjoy the form of service. I believe in believers baptism I don’t drink but don’t believe that’s for everyone. Always seems to big issues between the two . 

I call myself Reformed  as to where I fall I really don’t know . Sorry for the odd answer 

Blessings 

 Bill 

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3 minutes ago, Laish said:

Lol I attended a Presbyterian Church  I enjoy the form of service. I believe in believers baptism I don’t drink but don’t believe that’s for everyone. Always seems to big issues between the two . 

I call myself Reformed  as to where I fall I really don’t know . Sorry for the odd answer 

Blessings 

 Bill 

[quietly chants]

 

one of us....one of us.... one of us! ;)

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1 minute ago, Laish said:

Lol I attended a Presbyterian Church  I enjoy the form of service. I believe in believers baptism I don’t drink but don’t believe that’s for everyone. Always seems to big issues between the two . 

I call myself Reformed  as to where I fall I really don’t know . Sorry for the odd answer 

Blessings 

 Bill 

Not odd at all.

 

Good for you in that you don't drink. I love my craft beer! Though I have to put myself in check now and then to make sure I'm not ruled by anything.

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Laish said:

I believe in believers baptism I don’t drink but don’t believe that’s for everyone.

So do Reformed Presbyterians but not in exclusion to our Covenant children. We believe the Covenant sign and seal of baptism is extended to our children. The promise was made not only to heads of households but also our children and those far off. A Covenant "Seal" is the Promise.

 

Acts 2:38-39 And Peter said to them, “Repent and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins, and you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit. For the promise is for you and for your children and for all who are far off, everyone whom the Lord our God calls to himself.

 

Of course we believe in Credo-Baptism for adults. Where we differ from Baptist is the nature of Baptism as not only "symbolic" but as a Covenant sign and seal which is to be given to our children.

 

Note the familiar language between Acts 2:38-39 which was directed to the house of Israel that were under a Covenant where infants were circumcised.

 

Genesis 17:6 I will make you exceedingly fruitful, and I will make you into nations, and kings shall come from you. 7 And I will establish my covenant between me and you and your offspring after you throughout their generations for an everlasting covenant, to be God to you and to your offspring after you.

 

Notice any difference as to whom should be included? Neither do we:

 

Colossians 2:11-12 11 In him also you were circumcised with a circumcision made without hands, by putting off the body of the flesh, by the circumcision of Christ, 12 having been buried with him in baptism, in which you were also raised with him through faith in the powerful working of God, who raised him from the dead.

 

Why is Paul paralleling both Covenant signs and seals? In my opinion, Paul is bridging the Covenants and establishing a way for the house of Israel to transfer into the Church. The Church is comprised of the house of Israel. We are "One Tree", our very roots are the same.

 

God bless,

William

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1 hour ago, William said:

So do Reformed Presbyterians but not in exclusion to our Covenant children. We believe the Covenant sign and seal of baptism is extended to our children. The promise was made not only to heads of households but also our children and those far off. A Covenant "Seal" is the Promise.

 

Acts 2:38-39 And Peter said to them, “Repent and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins, and you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit. For the promise is for you and for your children and for all who are far off, everyone whom the Lord our God calls to himself.

 

Of course we believe in Credo-Baptism for adults. Where we differ from Baptist is the nature of Baptism as not only "symbolic" but as a Covenant sign and seal which is to be given to our children.

 

Note the familiar language between Acts 2:38-39 which was directed to the house of Israel that were under a Covenant where infants were circumcised.

 

Genesis 17:6 I will make you exceedingly fruitful, and I will make you into nations, and kings shall come from you. 7 And I will establish my covenant between me and you and your offspring after you throughout their generations for an everlasting covenant, to be God to you and to your offspring after you.

 

Notice any difference as to whom should be included? Neither do we:

 

Colossians 2:11-12 11 In him also you were circumcised with a circumcision made without hands, by putting off the body of the flesh, by the circumcision of Christ, 12 having been buried with him in baptism, in which you were also raised with him through faith in the powerful working of God, who raised him from the dead.

 

Why is Paul paralleling both Covenant signs and seals? In my opinion, Paul is bridging the Covenants and establishing a way for the house of Israel to transfer into the Church. The Church is comprised of the house of Israel. We are "One Tree", our very roots are the same.

 

God bless,

William

Cool thanks for the info ! I never dug deep in to the issue of the difference. I tend to agree with Baptist on the subject but what you posted shows more research on the subject won’t hurt . 

Sense we highjacked the thread let’s take it to Geneva. Cuba is so yesterday for highjacking . 

Blessings 

Bill 

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On ‎3‎/‎14‎/‎2019 at 6:41 PM, Mjh29 said:

I personally love this Bible. I have had mine for about 4 months now, and can't imagine reading without it. The notes are so helpful, and really give great insight to the Word. I love the old English, it really adds a poetic element, making it much easier to memorize. 

 

Your thoughts? Like or Dislike? 

Would love to have discussion! 

 

God Bless!

I've had one for a long time . But the major fault I find with it is that there aren't enough study notes in it . And when there are they tend to be short and difficult to understand. The Pulpit Commentary is my favorite when I want to do a deep search on a particular subject . And of course who can forget the Matthew Henry Commentary on the Whole Bible ?  :-)     M

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24 minutes ago, Matthew Duvall said:

I've had one for a long time . But the major fault I find with it is that there aren't enough study notes in it . And when there are they tend to be short and difficult to understand. The Pulpit Commentary is my favorite when I want to do a deep search on a particular subject . And of course who can forget the Matthew Henry Commentary on the Whole Bible ?  🙂 M

My gripe too is that the Geneva notes aren't as comprehensive as I'd wish they were. 

 

For commentary I read from Calvin, Henry, and D.A. Carson.

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1 minute ago, William said:

My gripe too is that the Geneva notes aren't as comprehensive as I'd wish they'd were. 

 

For commentary I read from Calvin, Henry, and D.A. Carson.

Truth is that I have so many bibles and related material that a housekeeper cleaning my library once asked me , "Are you a precha ? " I had to politely say , no....   :-) M

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On ‎3‎/‎19‎/‎2019 at 9:19 PM, William said:

My gripe too is that the Geneva notes aren't as comprehensive as I'd wish they were. 

 

For commentary I read from Calvin, Henry, and D.A. Carson.

I like my Biblical Illustrator . It is a twenty two volume set of sermons by Reformed preachers from Calvin and Edwards to Arthur Pink. But when I light into a subject that deserves investigating and arouses my interest I can't rest until I can fully understand what I am reading . I just received a shipment from one of the suppliers you may like. Its called A Method of Prayer by Matthew Henry.

I am intrigued by the way he breaks down various verses in scripture and makes suggestions of their use in prayer. It's only two hundred and fifty pages, but one of the best I have read on the subject of prayer .

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