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John Calvin puts forward a very simple reason why love is the greatest gift: “Because faith and hope are our own: love is diffused among others.” In other words, faith and hope benefit the possessor, but love always benefits another. In John 13:34–35 Jesus says, “A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.” Love always requires an “other” as an object; love cannot remain within itself, and that is part of what makes love the greatest gift.

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I am posting this just for fun.  Most of us grew up using (and still do) the KJV.  When quoting a passage out loud from memory almost always, in my case, it is from the KJV.

 

I am going to cite a verse from the KJV.  In that verse is an idiom I will put in bold.  Without any other source other than the KJV itself (do not look at any modern translation that would be cheating) given the meaning of the idiom.  You may check the context of the verse in the KJV.

 

"And if any man lie with her at all, and her flowers be upon him, he shall be unclean seven days; and all the bed whereon he lieth shall be unclean." (Lev. 15:24)

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 I connected it to 1 Cor. 7:36 in the KJV where it speaks of the flower of her age. Not sure if there is a connection.

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As one who spells neighbour with u  would understand that to be her cycle 

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Thanks @Becky.  That is it.

 

How about thing one anybody?

 

"Let no man seek his own, but every man another’s wealth." (1 Cor. 10:24)  Note that the word "wealth" is in italics.

 

Should we seek the wealth of another?

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7 minutes ago, Origen said:

Should we seek the wealth of another?

Can't help but think that the way this is worded envy is suggested (for want of what one does not deserve).

 

The problem with idioms is that there are modern idioms that are so similar and may convey something totally different that they may skew the mind of the reader. For example, deflowering a woman suggest defiling her (outside the context of marriage). My mind is actually having to discern the differences between what I know from modern idioms and ancient ones.

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12 minutes ago, Faber said:

 Could wealth mean well-being? (??)

Bingo!  Seek or look out for someone else's well being\welfare.

 

 

Alright, now here is a funny one.

 

"And it came to pass, when she came to him, that she moved him to ask of her father a field: and she lighted from off her ass; and Caleb said unto her, What wilt thou?" (Judges 1:14)

 

Also note another idiom in that same verse: "she moved him to ask of her father a field."

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2 minutes ago, Origen said:

Bingo!  Seek or look out for someone else's well being\welfare.

 

 

Alright, now here is a funny one.

 

"And it came to pass, when she came to him, that she moved him to ask of her father a field: and she lighted from off her ass; and Caleb said unto her, What wilt thou?" (Judges 1:14)

 

Also note another idiom in that same verse: "she moved him to ask of her father a field."

Kinda funny, "she lighted from off her ass". An ass is a beast of burden which makes me think her weight (sat) was on the donkey. Therefore to lighten her load from off the donkey would be to simply get off the donkey?

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10 minutes ago, William said:

Kinda funny, "she lighted from off her ass". An ass is a beast of burden which makes me think her weight (sat) was on the donkey. Therefore to lighten her load from off the donkey would be to simply get off the donkey?

I thought it was funny!😆  Yes you are correct.

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7 minutes ago, Origen said:

Now this one is not an idiom but has to do with word meaning.  Now no cheating!!!

 

"Yea, my reins shall rejoice, when thy lips speak right things." (Pro. 23:16)

 

What are "reins"?  HINT: We get a medical term from the word.

Some like reins some like kite strings.

 

I think reins are form of control over a horse, therefore the lips control our words and speak rightly?

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Just now, William said:

Some like reins some like kite strings.

 

I think reins are form of control over our mouth, therefore the lips control our words and speak rightly?

Sorry no.  This has nothing to do with horses.

 

"Thus my heart was grieved, and I was pricked in my reins." Ps. 73:21

 

This is a hard one.

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3 minutes ago, Origen said:

Sorry no.  This has nothing to do with horses.

 

"Thus my heart was grieved, and I was pricked in my reins." Ps. 73:21

 

This is a hard one.

Ya, I'd have to look up the word's definition (I didn't because you said no cheating). Otherwise, I'm left to a word meaning which is not applicable.

 

I can't from the context on the second one derive on a word meaning.

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19 minutes ago, William said:

Ya, I'd have to look up the word's definition. Otherwise, I'm left to a word meaning which is not applicable.

 

I can't from the context on the second one derive on a word meaning.

It is a hard one.  I doubt anyone could just guess it.  I will leave it for now and see if anyone else has an idea.

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We control critters with reins . like a bit in the mouth of a horse ........ my reins   = my should have known better

 

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Reins are innards I'm guessing.

Oh! Is it heart strings?

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22 minutes ago, Innerfire89 said:

Reins are innards I'm guessing.

Oh! Is it heart strings?

What are innards? Is that southern slang? Sounds like something southern folk serve up on a hot plate: innards or pigs feet, 'colored' greens, black eyed peas .... .

 

Ya then answer an idiom with another idiom (heart strings)?

 

pee wee lol GIF

 

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52 minutes ago, William said:

What are innards? Is that southern slang? Sounds like something southern folk serve up on a hot plate: innards or pigs feet, 'colored' greens, black eyed peas .... .

 

Ya then answer an idiom with another idiom (heart strings)?

 

pee wee lol GIF

 

I guess it's southern thing, innards are guts, but the first one he said wasn't an idiom. 

 

 

 

Now this one is not an idiom but has to do with word meaning.  Now no cheating!!!

 

"Yea, my reins shall rejoice, when thy lips speak right things." (Pro. 23:16)

 

What are "reins"?  HINT: We get a medical term from the word.

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5 hours ago, William said:

What are innards?

WWW.GOOGLE.COM
WWW.MERRIAM-WEBSTER.COM

the internal organs of a human being or animal; especially : viscera; the internal parts especially of a structure or mechanism… See the full definition
DICTIONARY.CAMBRIDGE.ORG

innards meaning: 1. the organs inside a person or animal, or the inside parts of a machine 2. the inner organs of a person or animal, or the inside parts of a machine: . Learn more.

 

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6 hours ago, Innerfire89 said:

Reins are innards I'm guessing.

Good guess!  Specifically kidneys.  As in renal disease (i.e. kidney disease).

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Next we have Numbers 34:5.

 

"And the border shall fetch a compass from Azmon unto the river of Egypt, and the goings out of it shall be at the sea."

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1 hour ago, Origen said:

Next we have Numbers 34:5.

 

"And the border shall fetch a compass from Azmon unto the river of Egypt, and the goings out of it shall be at the sea."

Hello @Origen,

 

Would it not mean to make a circuit? Or a round about course, eg.,2 Kings 3:9 -

 

' And he said, "Which way shall we go up?" 

And he answered, "The way through the wilderness of Edom."
So the king of Israel went, and the king of Judah, and the king of Edom:

and they fetched a compass of seven days' journey:

and there was no water for the host, and for the cattle that followed them.'

(2 Kings 3:8,9)

 

Edited by C.Jord
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5 minutes ago, C.Jord said:

Hello @Origen,

 

Would it not mean to make a circuit?

Correct CJ.  It has to do with routes of travel and borders.


This idiom is used five times in the Bible (Num. 34:5, Josh. 15:3, 2 Sam. 5:23, 2 Kings 3:9, Acts 28:13).

 

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Posted (edited)

'And old shoes and clouted upon their feet, and old garments upon them;

and all the bread of their provision was dry and mouldy.'
(Joshua 9:5)  

 

(Q) What do you think of the word, 'clouted' or 'clouts' as in  Jeremiah 38:11-12?

Edited by C.Jord

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15 minutes ago, C.Jord said:

a round about course

Colorful language which encompasses direction. I remember being in awe at one point when appreciating the KJV for its colorful language. The this, that, there, round about etc all convey direction at times.

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This one is really hard in my opinion, Daniel 11:30

 

"For the ships of Chittim shall come against him: therefore he shall be grieved, and return, and have indignation against the holy covenant: so shall he do; he shall even return, and have intelligence with them that forsake the holy covenant."

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