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Just Mike

Nicene Creed and Apostles Creed

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I am studding creeds and found it interesting the Reformed Church has both creeds. My question is whey is the Nicene Creed preferred to more over the Apostles' Creed? I see the Apostles' is shorter, perhaps is this the reason?

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1 hour ago, Just Mike said:

I am studding creeds and found it interesting the Reformed Church has both creeds. My question is whey is the Nicene Creed preferred to more over the Apostles' Creed? I see the Apostles' is shorter, perhaps is this the reason?

Hey Stud,

 

The Apostle's Creed (2nd century) is actually the first and oldest in comparison to the Nicene Creed (4th plus century). The Apostle's Creed wasn't as comprehensive as the Nicene Creed in establishing orthodoxy, therefore, some heresy still slipped past the Apostle's Creed into the church. The Nicene Creed was later established some centuries later, directly addressing heresy of the day, and the Nicene Creed continued to be developed until its final draft after questions arose about the Holy Spirit in relation to the church.

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Thanks William. A Confession is more detailed than a Creed, does the Reformed Presbyterian Covenant Church ( I hope I wrote this right) have a Confession beyond the Nicene Creed?

 

SB have a Confession of Faith which is very detailed and has changed three times from the first one in 1925. Many say it is more leaning to a Reformed Confession, and to a certain extent I would agree. A good number of SB churches have gone to the ESV in preaching and pew Bibles. Still a larger number use the NASB, my church uses the CSB which is still almost identical to the HCSB.

 

Are there other Creeds you think are valuable to read about. Thanks God bless.

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9 minutes ago, Just Mike said:

Thanks William. A Confession is more detailed than a Creed, does the Reformed Presbyterian Covenant Church ( I hope I wrote this right) have a Confession beyond the Nicene Creed?

 

SB have a Confession of Faith which is very detailed and has changed three times from the first one in 1925. Many say it is more leaning to a Reformed Confession, and to a certain extent I would agree. A good number of SB churches have gone to the ESV in preaching and pew Bibles. Still a larger number use the NASB, my church uses the CSB which is still almost identical to the HCSB.

 

Are there other Creeds you think are valuable to read about. Thanks God bless.

Yes, Reformed use the Westminster Confession of Faith and/or the Heidelberg Catechism.

 

For example, read the first chapter of the Westminster which establishes Sola Scriptura:

 

 

 

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I glanced at both, the Westminster Confession is as long as the London Baptist Confession. Sadly these excellent Confessions and Creeds are very seldom mentioned in SB churches if ever, except for the "Baptist Faith and Message". I think the Baptist Faith and Message is very close to a creed. Many Baptist churches use  London Baptist Confession of Faith 1689 and they would be Reformed. 

 

Just reading these different Confessions is interesting in how they differ in small areas. I personally prefer the Baptist Faith and Message of 1925 over the one of 2000. Why some desired to make two more new ones seems unwarranted IMO.

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7 minutes ago, Just Mike said:

I glanced at both, the Westminster Confession is as long as the London Baptist Confession.

The London is basically a reworking of the Westminster to be aligned with the biblical, I mean Baptist, view of Baptism.

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31 minutes ago, davidtaylorjr said:

The London is basically a reworking of the Westminster to be aligned with the biblical, I mean Baptist, view of Baptism.

The London is basically a reworking of the Westminster to be aligned with the biblical [traditional], I mean Baptist, view of Baptism.

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2 minutes ago, William said:

The London is basically a reworking of the Westminster to be aligned with the biblical [traditional], I mean Baptist, view of Baptism.

Lol I was looking for the strikethrough.

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Actually the very first London Confession of Faith came out first in 1644 and the Westminster Confession came out in 1646, so by the dates the Westminster reworked and aligned with the traditional, and the London Confession was Biblical IMO. From a Baptist view point on Baptism by immersion.

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3 minutes ago, Just Mike said:

Actually the very first London Confession of Faith came out first in 1644 and the Westminster Confession came out in 1646, so by the dates the Westminster reworked and aligned with the traditional, and the London Confession was Biblical IMO. From a Baptist view point on Baptism by immersion.

I've actually never seen the text of the LBCF1. I just know all of the writings about LCBF2 say it is a reworking of the WCF.  And yes, the London Confession is more biblical in my opinion too but we are outnumbered on this forum. 😉

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9 hours ago, Just Mike said:

Actually the very first London Confession of Faith came out first in 1644 and the Westminster Confession came out in 1646, so by the dates the Westminster reworked and aligned with the traditional, and the London Confession was Biblical IMO. From a Baptist view point on Baptism by immersion.

The thing I appreciate about Confessions is that we ought not defend the Confessions themselves. We defend our doctrinal positions from Scripture and not Confessions. The Confessions are what we believe about the Scriptures which the Westminster Confession of Faith establishes in the opening chapter the Protestant Pillar Sola Scriptura.

 

From there the 5 Solas are established and the Systematic Theology of the Reformed faith begins to shine.

 

Not pitting one Confession (Reformed) against another Confession (Baptist) but I'd like to address who we are "Protesting" and "Reforming". Consider the Protestant Reformation was addressing the Roman Catholic church and the Baptist the Church of England.

 

For this obvious reason in differing audience Protestant is an umbrella term which simply means to Protest. Such a simplistic definition "protest" may then be used to umbrella Reformed and even Baptist. However, in consideration of the original audience Protestant Reformed is rightfully termed to Protesting the Catholic church and Reforming her back to orthodoxy. The Baptist generally aren't called Reformed but "Particular" because of our differences in which we appeal to orthodoxy. In modern day Baptist that adhere to such Confessions and Creeds are called Reformed. That is a way to work actual Protestant Reformers up in arms.

 

Catholics suggest that Reformed Protestants broke away from the church. I reject that notion and suggest that Reformed Protestants are the true historic catholic church and the (C)atholics broke free from the catholic church when tradition leaned her away and they abandoned apostolic doctrine. Therefore, Reformed Protestants are realigned to the catholic church whereas the Catholics are apostate. The point of the Reformation was a return to Scriptural principles which the early catholic church adhered even in her councils.

 

Martin Luther rightly suggested that councils contradict. That isn't to say that all councils are wrong, but that early catholics which adhered to certain principles such as Sola Scriptura were contradicted by later councils which abandoned these principles for tradition. This is why the early Ecumenical Creeds are limited to only those following such principles in the Reformed Protestant church.

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Just Google the LBC 1 and you can read it all. Yes I know this is a Reformed site, and I always hope my posts are respectful, kind and never offensive, that's what Jesus commanded us to be. John 13:34,35. God bless.

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This isn't a Reformed site. It is a Protestant site which is owned by me a Reformed member. Protestant is much more open to a variety of bodies in Christendom than Reformed is. A strict Reformed site would really narrow down our target demographic.

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9 minutes ago, William said:

Not pitting one Confession (Reformed) against another Confession (Baptist)

Reformed and Baptist are not mutually exclusive. 😉 

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5 minutes ago, William said:

This isn't a Reformed site.

laugh lol GIF

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Just now, Origen said:

laugh lol GIF

i get it omg GIF by Originals

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1 hour ago, William said:

The thing I appreciate about Confessions is that we ought not defend the Confessions themselves. We defend from Scripture and not Confessions.

Amen

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The big difference between the Apostles Creed and the Nicene Creed is the reference to how Jesus descended into Hell.  The Nicene Creed omits this, and the more conservative of the Reformed denominations use this one over the Apostle's Creed.  If they do use the Apostle's Creed there is an explanation as to what that phrase means.

 

Have you also looked at the Athanasian Creed?  I have found it has a really good description of the Trinity.

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