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John Calvin puts forward a very simple reason why love is the greatest gift: “Because faith and hope are our own: love is diffused among others.” In other words, faith and hope benefit the possessor, but love always benefits another. In John 13:34–35 Jesus says, “A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.” Love always requires an “other” as an object; love cannot remain within itself, and that is part of what makes love the greatest gift.
OpenBiblica

Do you want to involve in translating bible?

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Dear all,

 

My name is Kusuma from Indonesia and working on OpenBiblica project.

 

The goal is to make bible translation faster and better.

Please watch this youtube video and support me.

 

Thanks and God bless you.

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Staff

@OpenBiblica Some of our member will be praying for you and your project. This site does not allow for solicitation of funds .. 

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Why do you think there is a need for a new Bible? With Wycliffe and New Tribe Missions that do Bible translating all over the world are they not doing a better job? Who is in charge with this new Bible and what are their qualifications? Thanks for your response.

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I am friends with a man at Lockman Foundation that works in the translation team. They have been working on another "update" for the NASB. They started in 2014 and this will be much more intensive work than the 1995 UPDATED was. To do a complete new Bible translation it cost MILLIONS of dollars, and finding the translators willing to commit to  stay  and complete the work all the way with its many revisions in between and see it to completion can be difficult to find. Often the pay is just getting your name in print and  some basic pay to help.

 

When a serious translation comes out the work has just begun, if a New Bible has any hope of becoming a serious Bible that Bible will bring enough sales to pay for the expensive's  can takes years. Scholars need to give their seal of approval as well getting some denomination to use the Bible in their Sunday School material. If all this comes together then a commentary and other Bible Tools must be developed. The road for this takes many years. The NASB has done all the above and the ESV is still working of some of these steps.

 

So if your thinking of making a new Bible, maybe your not thinking   too deeply enough. 

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5 minutes ago, Just Mike said:

The NASB has done all the above and the ESV is still working of some of these steps.

Actually, I would say the ESV has accomplished all of those as well.

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On 1/26/2019 at 7:35 AM, Just Mike said:

I am friends with a man at Lockman Foundation that works in the translation team. They have been working on another "update" for the NASB.

 

 Hello Just Mike,

 

 I was wondering why in the NASB that since "We" and "Our" are capitalized (in reference to the Father and to the Son) in John 14:23, then why isn't "their" capitalized (in reference to the Father and to the Son) in Revelation 6:17?

 

 Just curious.

 

 

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On ‎1‎/‎25‎/‎2019 at 2:45 PM, OpenBiblica said:

Dear all,

 

My name is Kusuma from Indonesia and working on OpenBiblica project.

 

The goal is to make bible translation faster and better.

Please watch this youtube video and support me.

 

Thanks and God bless you.

Hi, no offence but I think that the bible has undergone enough translations to the point where confusion and frustration enter the picture . By that I mean that enough emphasis has been applied to the bible over the years and eventually causes a danger in misunderstanding and even out right damnable  errors for those who are serious about leading a godly life centered on everything they learn from the holy bible. To me ,and many in my church, we do our best to avoid any of the latest interpretations because they either misrepresent scripture or leave entire verses out . I don't have the publication any more that did an excellent job of pointing out the many errors and voids and missing verses that were applied to the holy text . Unfortunately it became lost and I miss it dearly. Many have no problem with  Multitudes of current interpretations . I do ! " The Women's Bible " " The Life Application Bible,"

"The Children's Bible," all have questionable chapters ,verses and study notes that are loaded with error . I see no reason that a bible has to be created to make 'bible translations faster and better '. What's wrong with a good old King James Version that represents a multitude of devout theological scholars who worked endlessly to give us what we now have .A bible that few, if any would question as being in error .       M

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11 hours ago, Matthew Duvall said:

What's wrong with a good old King James Version that represents a multitude of devout theological scholars who worked endlessly to give us what we now have .A bible that few, if any would question as being in error .

One problem with the KJV is that it was made in the 17th century and the English language has changed since then.  I grew up using this translation so I don't have a problem with it but it could be a real obstacle for someone reading the Bible for the first time.  

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6 hours ago, theophilus said:

One problem with the KJV is that it was made in the 17th century and the English language has changed since then.  I grew up using this translation so I don't have a problem with it but it could be a real obstacle for someone reading the Bible for the first time.  

I use the King James extensively in my bible studies .However there are times when some passages are so difficult to understand that I use the NIV to clear up my confusion and misunderstanding . I just have a problem thinking that there are too many newer bibles out there that are aimed at attracting the new believer or just some person or persons that are curious about the bible in general. In cases like that the bible usually finds itself on a closet shelf gathering dust .  

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On 6/6/2019 at 10:34 AM, Matthew Duvall said:

What's wrong with a good old King James Version

Not everyone speaks/reads English and amongst those who do some may simply prefer reading the Bible in their native language. This of course is not a short coming specific only to the KJV. 

 

Another interesting question is: What was wrong with the translations that preceded the KJV? Or why/what was the need felt for production of the KJV? 

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20 hours ago, Matthew Duvall said:

I use the King James extensively in my bible studies .However there are times when some passages are so difficult to understand that I use the NIV to clear up my confusion and misunderstanding . I just have a problem thinking that there are too many newer bibles out there that are aimed at attracting the new believer or just some person or persons that are curious about the bible in general. In cases like that the bible usually finds itself on a closet shelf gathering dust .  

Your properly aware that there are more accurate translations than the KJV, and that's one reason for other Bibles as well as some Bibles address the different reading levels of people and children, then there culture differences op people.  The English Standard Version, and the New American Standard Bible are more accurate English Bibles then the KJV, and for some this is very important. I am not saying the KJV Bible is not of high value/ For me I was raised on the KJV  and when the Living Letter Bible came out in the sixties I was blessed and Bible reading became even more a part of my life. I used the NIV and NASB for many years as my primary Bible and now I use the Holman Christian Standard bible most all the time as it speaks more clearly and the words follow the NASB very closely. When I was a Pastor I used the 1984 NIV all the time and it was more relevant to the people in the churches, I would NOT ever recommend the NIV after the 1984.

 

There are reasons for different translations for instance the New Living Translation is for people with very low reading skills and it has helped many people read the Bible who otherwise would not have. So Matthew I am very pleased you are active in reading the Bible and that truly is one reason there are a number of different Bibles, to get people in reading the Bible on a regular consistant basis. God bless, brother.

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12 hours ago, Ben Asher said:

Not everyone speaks/reads English and amongst those who do some may simply prefer reading the Bible in their native language. This of course is not a short coming specific only to the KJV. 

 

Another interesting question is: What was wrong with the translations that preceded the KJV? Or why/what was the need felt for production of the KJV? 

I'm glad you brought up the subject pertaining to translations that preceded the KJV. Something that I have never given any thought to. It makes for an interesting study into the eternal word. Something that will keep me busy over the week end . Thanks again for that interesting thought . It will be interesting to see what the biblical historians revealed in their quest to uncover the various translations of the holy text.    M

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Hey@Matthew Duvall I would be very happy to hear what you discover. I do not know a lot about the history leading up to the production of the KJV, but I do know that the KJV has had a lasting impact on the English language (both spoken and written) and continues to do so today. Interestingly enough this is a belief that both religious and secular scholars readily accept.

 

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No other book, or indeed any piece of culture, seems to have influenced the English language as much as the King James Bible. Its turns of phrase have permeated the everyday language of English speakers, whether or not they've ever opened a copy.

https://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-12205084


 

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Another remarkable testimonial to the influence of the KJV comes from New Atheist thinker Richard Dawkins, who normally has nothing good to say about any aspect of religion. On the King James, however, he becomes lyrical, so much so that he prays, apologetically, "Forgive me, spirit of science!" But as he asks, how on earth can anyone who cares about language be so ignorant and insensitive as not to appreciate the magnificent tones of the KJV? He continues, again freely quoting King James-isms, "If my words fall on stony ground -- if you pass me by as a voice crying in the wilderness -- be sure your sin will find you out. Between us there is a great gulf fixed and you are a thorn in my flesh. We have come to the parting of the ways. I fear it is a sign of the times." And those are the words of a declared mortal enemy of the Bible!

https://www.baylor.edu/alumni/magazine/0904/news.php?action=story&story=95758

 

 

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From Handel’s Messiah to Coolio’s “Gangsta’s Paradise,” the King James Bible has inspired a wide swath of cultural expression across the English-speaking world over generations. Writers from Herman Melville to Ernest Hemingway to Alice Walker have drawn on its cadences and imagery for their work, while Martin Luther King Jr. quoted the King James Version of Isaiah (from memory) in his famous “I Have a Dream” speech.Beyond the countless artists and leaders inspired by the King James Bible, its influence can be seen in many of the expressions English speakers use every day. Phrases like “my brother’s keeper,” “the kiss of death,” “the blind leading the blind,” “fall from grace,” “eye for an eye” and “a drop in the bucket”—to name only a few—all owe their existence, or at least their popularization in English, to the KJV.

https://www.history.com/news/king-james-bible-most-popular


 

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Four centuries after its first printing, the King James Bible (1611) remains one of the most influential books in the English language.

 

https://www.hrc.utexas.edu/exhibitions/2012/kingjamesbible/

 

 

AND my own brief comments on the KJV:

On 5/22/2019 at 7:41 AM, Ben Asher said:

The KJV definitely has its place in the history of the English language (as well as British politics) and it continues to remain pristine specimen of middle English literature. It, in short, is an heirloom bequeath to all those who have a passion for the English language and its literature.

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