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John Calvin puts forward a very simple reason why love is the greatest gift: “Because faith and hope are our own: love is diffused among others.” In other words, faith and hope benefit the possessor, but love always benefits another. In John 13:34–35 Jesus says, “A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.” Love always requires an “other” as an object; love cannot remain within itself, and that is part of what makes love the greatest gift.
kunoichi9280

Returning Protestant

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Hi, 

My name is Sara and I'm returning to Protestant Christianity after 15 years as a Catholic.  It's weird; on one hand I'm a very new believer- only a few weeks.  On the other hand, I was Protestant before I was Catholic, and I know a lot about both, so I'm not a newbie in that sense.  

I'm a student who is currently taking a break from school due to health reasons, and I like to write, read, listen to music/sing, and play video games.  I live in the Pacific Northwest.  

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Hello and welcome Sara

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Hello Kunoichi (female ninja or practitioner of ninjutsu),

 

 Welcome aboard.

 

 I was also a Roman Catholic for quite a few years and I also lived in Oregon.

 

 Glad you are here. I hope you can be edified as well as edify others.

 

 Faber

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16 hours ago, Faber said:

Hello Kunoichi (female ninja or practitioner of ninjutsu),

 

 Welcome aboard.

 

 I was also a Roman Catholic for quite a few years and I also lived in Oregon.

 

 Glad you are here. I hope you can be edified as well as edify others.

 

 Faber

 

Are you an anime fan, or do you know Japanese?  🙂   What part of Oregon did you live in?  I'm kind of north-central.  

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Welcome Sara!

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5 hours ago, kunoichi9280 said:

 

Are you an anime fan, or do you know Japanese?  🙂   What part of Oregon did you live in?  I'm kind of north-central.  

 

 I know a very small amount of Japanese both speaking and reading the characters. I lived and taught there for 1 year but this was 20 years ago.

 I lived in Salem for a short period of time.

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On 12/16/2018 at 5:02 AM, kunoichi9280 said:

Hi, 

My name is Sara and I'm returning to Protestant Christianity after 15 years as a Catholic.  It's weird; on one hand I'm a very new believer- only a few weeks.  On the other hand, I was Protestant before I was Catholic, and I know a lot about both, so I'm not a newbie in that sense.  

I'm a student who is currently taking a break from school due to health reasons, and I like to write, read, listen to music/sing, and play video games.  I live in the Pacific Northwest.  

Welcome!  I'm also a recent convert from Catholicism.  I'm also from the Pacific Northwest.

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On ‎12‎/‎22‎/‎2018 at 7:07 PM, Even So said:

Hey Sara, either way you are loved here. Have you posted or can talk about why you left?

I posted in the testimony section today.  Basically it was both that I was questioning key areas of Catholic doctrine (ex:  the infallibility of the Church, if for no other reason in the light of the contridictions in Catholic teaching between pre-Vatican II and post Vatican II teaching) and I was craving for a different relationship with Jesus then I had; a relationship that the whole Catholic system seemed to be preventing me from having.  

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37 minutes ago, kunoichi9280 said:

I posted in the testimony section today.  Basically it was both that I was questioning key areas of Catholic doctrine (ex:  the infallibility of the Church, if for no other reason in the light of the contridictions in Catholic teaching between pre-Vatican II and post Vatican II teaching) and I was craving for a different relationship with Jesus then I had; a relationship that the whole Catholic system seemed to be preventing me from having.  

It was the contradictions from before and after Vatican II that did it for me as well.  Pope Francis openly contradicting previous Popes didn't help either.

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2 hours ago, kunoichi9280 said:

I posted in the testimony section today.  Basically it was both that I was questioning key areas of Catholic doctrine (ex:  the infallibility of the Church, if for no other reason in the light of the contridictions in Catholic teaching between pre-Vatican II and post Vatican II teaching) and I was craving for a different relationship with Jesus then I had; a relationship that the whole Catholic system seemed to be preventing me from having.  

Very insightful kunoichi9280. I hope to see you stick around here and become an active member in that you're here to answer questions for those seeking the Protestant faith. Your insight and experiences may be a very valuable resource for those leaning away from Catholicism.

 

God bless,

William

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2 hours ago, Concord said:

It was the contradictions from before and after Vatican II that did it for me as well.  Pope Francis openly contradicting previous Popes didn't help either.

To remain Catholic, I would have to basically ignore the fact that he was pope.  Kind of impossible.  So I sympathize. 

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10 minutes ago, kunoichi9280 said:

To remain Catholic, I would have to basically ignore the fact that he was pope.  Kind of impossible.  So I sympathize. 

You'd be surprised by how many "rebellious" Catholics there are. What I mean is that they forsake the authority of the Pope and Catholic church but still adhere to and teach Catholic doctrine. Ultimately, you'll find a numerous amount of denominations in Protestantism which have abandoned the foundational doctrines of the Protestant faith such as the Five Solas and are regressing back to Rome. To them "Protestant" simply means to protest or rebel against Catholic authority.

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8 hours ago, kunoichi9280 said:

To remain Catholic, I would have to basically ignore the fact that he was pope.  Kind of impossible.  So I sympathize. 

It's one of those things where doctrine has clearly changed, and if it's changed that means it was either in error before or is in error now.  Either way, it means the Church was in error at some point which means the Church is not infallible.  And if they were wrong about infallibility, what else might they be wrong about?  The final straw was the inerrancy of scripture:  The Catholic Church USED to believe in it.  At Vatican II they rejected it.

 

Bottom line is the Catholic Church embraced the Modernist heresy (like the mainline Protestant churches did before) at Vatican II and the Modernists have been in control ever since and have led the Church into apostasy.

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8 hours ago, William said:

You'd be surprised by how many "rebellious" Catholics there are. What I mean is that they forsake the authority of the Pope and Catholic church but still adhere to and teach Catholic doctrine. Ultimately, you'll find a numerous amount of denominations in Protestantism which have abandoned the foundational doctrines of the Protestant faith such as the Five Solas and are regressing back to Rome. To them "Protestant" simply means to protest or rebel against Catholic authority.

Agreed, for example, the United Methodist Church does not believe Scripture is the final authority. They say we must also look at tradition, reason, logic, science, and experience. Does that sound familiar anyone? History repeats itself?

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12 hours ago, William said:

You'd be surprised by how many "rebellious" Catholics there are. What I mean is that they forsake the authority of the Pope and Catholic church but still adhere to and teach Catholic doctrine. Ultimately, you'll find a numerous amount of denominations in Protestantism which have abandoned the foundational doctrines of the Protestant faith such as the Five Solas and are regressing back to Rome. To them "Protestant" simply means to protest or rebel against Catholic authority.

I went to a "traditional" Catholic church for years, and our stance was basically to ignore anything that had happened since the Second Vatican council.  We had very technical, in depth reasons why this was true and right, and over time I began to wonder; wouldn't God make it easier to know truth?  Would He demand that you had all this intensive theological knowledge just to know what truth was?  Not everyone is interested or capable of that. I remember trying to share with my mom and my in laws, and their eyes just glazing over as I went into Canon law and the definition of infallibility and how by the skin of our teeth you could ignore the Pope, etc.  

4 hours ago, Concord said:

It's one of those things where doctrine has clearly changed, and if it's changed that means it was either in error before or is in error now.  Either way, it means the Church was in error at some point which means the Church is not infallible.  And if they were wrong about infallibility, what else might they be wrong about?  The final straw was the inerrancy of scripture:  The Catholic Church USED to believe in it.  At Vatican II they rejected it.

 

Bottom line is the Catholic Church embraced the Modernist heresy (like the mainline Protestant churches did before) at Vatican II and the Modernists have been in control ever since and have led the Church into apostasy.

This is almost exactly my experience, and what got me looking at the other errors in Catholicism, as well as personal reasons.  I just couldn't try to put the square peg in the round hole anymore and tell myself they actually lined up. 

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9 minutes ago, kunoichi9280 said:

This is almost exactly my experience, and what got me looking at the other errors in Catholicism, as well as personal reasons.  I just couldn't try to put the square peg in the round hole anymore and tell myself they actually lined up. 

Catholic apologist are really skilled at that approach to fitting pegs 🤣 

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How easy or difficult is it to leave Catholicism? Is there some sect-like behavior when you say you want to leave the Catholic Church, or do they just give you your freedom to go?

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4 hours ago, hanna said:

How easy or difficult is it to leave Catholicism? Is there some sect-like behavior when you say you want to leave the Catholic Church, or do they just give you your freedom to go?

I just stopped attending Mass and started attending one of the local LCMS church's services.  What are they going to do?  Send the cops after me?  My wife and I didn't even say anything, we just stopped attending.  They were blissfully ignorant until the Deacon called my wife for an update on her annulment proceedings and she told him to withdraw the case.

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On ‎12‎/‎29‎/‎2018 at 2:19 AM, hanna said:

How easy or difficult is it to leave Catholicism? Is there some sect-like behavior when you say you want to leave the Catholic Church, or do they just give you your freedom to go?

In my case, I had lost all but one of my Catholic friends over some complicated personal problems, so no one cared.  My one friend is a very devout Catholic, but she fully believes Protestants are saved (she believes we have a lot of the faith but only Catholics have the "full" faith), so she was fine, although I'm sure she's disappointed.  I had left my previous parish and hadn't really made any connections at another one so it was less of an issue for me.   Had I done it five years ago, though, I believe we would have had a great deal of social pressure to stay, and the priest probably would have wanted to meet with us..

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