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John Calvin puts forward a very simple reason why love is the greatest gift: “Because faith and hope are our own: love is diffused among others.” In other words, faith and hope benefit the possessor, but love always benefits another. In John 13:34–35 Jesus says, “A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.” Love always requires an “other” as an object; love cannot remain within itself, and that is part of what makes love the greatest gift.
ConfessionalLutheran

St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre

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 Today is a sad day in French Protestant history. Today, a slaughter of French Huguenots commenced in Paris at the instigation of the Catholic Queen Catherine de Medici on August 24, 1572. French Catholic nobles and commoners alike went after the Huguenots, beginning in Paris and then spreading to other parts of France. It started when Queen Catherine tried to get a Huguenot leader assassinated and failed. When Queen Catherine's daughter married a leading Huguenot nobleman, Henry of Navarre, there was a huge celebration in Paris that many Huguenot nobles attended. Queen Catherine saw in that her opportunity to slaughter the Huguenot nobles and she seized that opportunity. 

 

It was a bloodbath that was celebrated by both the Spanish king and the Pope. It also sparked another round of bloodshed between the papists and the Huguenots.

WWW.BRITANNICA.COM

Massacre of St. Bartholomew's Day: Massacre of Saint Bartholomew’s Day, massacre of French Huguenots (Protestants) in Paris on August 24/25, 1572, plotted by Catherine de Medicis.
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Staff

Thank you for sharing this CL., and I moved this to the Christian History Sub-forum.

 

What I found interesting in the provided link:

 

Instead of crippling the Huguenot party as Catherine had hoped it would do, the massacre revived hatred between Roman Catholics and Huguenots and helped provoke a renewal of hostilities. Thenceforth the Huguenots abandoned John Calvin’s principle of obedience to the civil magistrate—that is, to the royal authority—and adopted the view that rebellion and tyrannicide were justifiable under certain circumstances.

 

I'd love to hear those arguments! The principle of obedience to the civil magistrate seemingly also was followed by Martin Luther as well as Calvin, from the writings of Paul during his persecution. I'm unstudied on this particular historical event and the doctrines which unfolded thereafter, but I think many church fathers indicated or contributed support of Just War Principals, that is, when the act of war is justified. As we can see from the below dates, though this theory was supported before the Hugenot massacre, a lot of contribution to Just War Principals seemingly surfaced and was an epicenter around that time:

 

Although St. Augustine provided comments on the morality of war from the Christian perspective (railing against the love of violence that war can engender) as did several Arabic commentators in the intellectual flourishing from the 9th to 12th centuries, but the most systematic exposition in the Western tradition and one that still attracts attention was outlined by Saint Thomas Aquinas in the 13th century. In the Summa Theologicae, Aquinas presents the general outline of what becomes the traditional just war theory as discussed in modern universities. He discusses not only the justification of war but also the kinds of activity that are permissible (for a Christian) in war (see below). Aquinas's thoughts become the model for later Scholastics and Jurists to expand and to gradually to universalize beyond Christendom – notably, for instance, in relations with the peoples of America following European incursions into the continent. The most important of these writers are: Francisco de Vitoria (1486-1546), Francisco Suarez (1548-1617), Hugo Grotius (1583-1645), Samuel Pufendorf (1632-1704), Christian Wolff (1679-1754), and Emerich de Vattel (1714-1767).

 

God bless,

William

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It was less difficult to murder the Huguenots than to try and defend a belief system that simply can not be defended.

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Despite Martin Luther's opposition to political rebellion of any kind, there are certain times when Lutherans find political change more than justified.. 

WWW.HAUSVATER.ORG

A biblical vision for family, church, and society in the spirit of the Lutheran confessions

 

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1 minute ago, ConfessionalLutheran said:

Despite Martin Luther's opposition to political rebellion of any kind, there are certain times when Lutherans find political change more than justified.. 

WWW.HAUSVATER.ORG

A biblical vision for family, church, and society in the spirit of the Lutheran confessions

 

Awesome!

 

In summary, the Geneva Bible promoted obedience to both higher and lower magistrates, and to the laws of the land, as limited within a constitutional framework—and all of this only so long as no civil mandate ran afoul of God’s moral law. Such a posture left open the possibility that a citizen would have to disobey one magistrate in order to obey a differently minded magistrate, with the prioritization among magistrates being determined not by rank alone, but by agreement with two other standards: the jurisdiction of each magistrate as defined by the operative constitution and, trumping all other considerations, the immutable principles of God’s moral law.

 

To King James I, who espoused a strong theory of royal prerogative, the Geneva theology was tantamount to treason; for Calvinist Puritans (who in time would gain enough votes in Parliament to depose two of James’s successors), the Geneva footnotes preserved a theology worth dying for. As smuggled copies of the outlawed Geneva Bible floated across the English Channel in ever growing quantities, James abandoned censorship in favor of a more practical means of preventing the English people from reading the Puritans’ prized republican footnotes: the king sponsored an alternative translation, devoid of political contraband, and sought to flood the market with cheap copies. Thus originated the “Authorized [i.e., not smuggled] Version,” also known as the “King James Version.” Significantly for American history, it was not the KJV, but rather than Geneva Bible, that became the Bible of New England’s Puritans.

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Gaspard de Coligny was the Huguenot that Queen Catherine tried to whack and failed at her first attempt. 

WWW.BRITANNICA.COM

Gaspard II de Coligny, seigneur de Châtillon: Gaspard II de Coligny, seigneur de Châtillon, admiral of France and leader of the Huguenots during the early years of the Wars of Religion (1562–98). Coligny was the son of Gaspard I de Coligny, the marshal of Châtillon, and Louise de Montmorency, sister of Anne de Montmorency, constable of France.
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